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A Smart Cart for Scraps

comments (3) June 22nd, 2012 in blogs

sscott Stephen Scott, associate editor
thumbs up 115 users recommend

Separate bins of varying height make it easy to sort and retrieve scrap pieces of different sizes.
Separate bins of varying height make it easy to sort and retrieve scrap pieces of different sizes. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Separate bins of varying height make it easy to sort and retrieve scrap pieces of different sizes.


Plans badgeThere are two great things about a woodworking scrap pile. First, a scrap pile is easy to come by - even for a novice woodworker; make just a couple of projects, and you'll have the beginnings of a good one. Second, and more seriously, a scrap pile provides the raw material for a lot of important creative stuff - testing ideas, tinkering, building mockups and jigs. It's also where you can discover the perfect stock for that small project.

The trouble is that, by it's nature, the scrap pile is kind of a mess. And sorting through a tangle of mismatched offcuts is no way to spend your creative energy. 

Reader Will Moore tackled that problem head-on by building a super functional bin for storing and sorting varying sizes of scrap. It's a smart way to turn a rat's nest into an accessible, organized resource. The free download includes Moore's winning tip from our Methods of Work column, along with the full-color drawings that accompanied it, illustrating the bin's simple construction.

Also, for a variety of different lumber storage solutions, check out Andy Beasley's article in issue #181.

 CLICK HERE for the free article download

 

exploded dwg

 



posted in: blogs, workshop, free plan, scraps;, cut offs


Comments (3)

liammurray liammurray writes: I thought long an hard about modifications and initially came up with several variations to accommodate wider pieces of plywood. In the end I built it as is, only slightly longer. I decided I would dedicate this to hardwood scraps and relatively thin plywood scraps and am happy I did. After I completed the project I almost filled it up immediately with all the scraps I had in my shop (extremely satisfying). I used bb ply. One challenge is making the angle on the tops of the horizontal dividers match the sides. If you stick to 45 degrees or less (so the tilt angle you need to set on your tablesaw for cutting the horizontal piece ends is 45 degrees or less, assuming your saw has a max 45 degree tilt) it will be easier to cut the pieces on your tablesaw to match. I cut the side dados first, then cut the side angles with my circular saw.
Posted: 11:38 am on April 1st

pdavis pdavis writes: I am thinking of a slight modification of having the two cross pieces only go 24", allowing the third column to be one open column, accommodating wider pieces of scrap. If I lay this out, I need one 4x8 sheet of plywood plus an 8x54 piece of plywood. Anyone have some ideas to play with the design to only require one 4x8 sheet? (or correct me if I made a layout error!)

Posted: 2:54 pm on July 17th

rgdaniel rgdaniel writes: I built this ages ago. Second only to my drill-press table as the most useful shop-thing I ever built.
Posted: 12:38 pm on June 23rd

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