Reader's Gallery

Small cabinet in quarter sawn white oak, with inlaid doors, employing the technique as described in "A Unique Cutting Board," FWW 233

comments (0) February 18th, 2014 in Reader's Gallery

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Two boards were glued together to accept the two bands of inlay (one walnut, one cherry), then cut apart to make the two doors.
an oblique view, showing the 5 degree inclined front of this cabinet.
A close up of the inlay used in the doors.
A close up of the inlay technique
Two boards were glued together to accept the two bands of inlay (one walnut, one cherry), then cut apart to make the two doors. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Two boards were glued together to accept the two bands of inlay (one walnut, one cherry), then cut apart to make the two doors.

Photo: Louis Benjamin, Riverdale Fine Furniture

I was commissioned by a synagogue to build a portable cabinet ("ark") in which to store and transport a Torah scroll. Cabinet is made of 5/8" quarter sawn white oak, with an inclined front (5 degrees).

Two inch casters are installed in the rear which only engage when the cabinet is tipped about 12 degrees. Finish is danish oil, spar urethane and wax.  

The interesting feature of this piece are the doors, which employ Scott Lewis' inlay technique from FWW 233. Lewis used it for a cutting board but said he could "also imagine using it on chair backs, box lids, or cabinet doors." I took up the challenge. My client loves the result, hope you do, too.

Since buidling this, I have been commissioned to build a table top employing the same technique. The glue-up should be quite challenging on a piece of that size, but this smaller project gave me lots of hands-on training.


Design or Plan used: My Own Design - Louis Benjamin

posted in: Reader's Gallery, cabinet


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