Reader's Gallery

Godzilla the Horizontal Mortiser

comments (3) October 10th, 2010 in Reader's Gallery

GarageWoodworks GarageWoodworks, member
thumbs up 5 users recommend

This photo is in 3D.  You will need blue-red 3D glasses to view it.
See a larger version here.

 

I recently finished a horizontal mortiser that I affectionately call Godzilla because of its size.  It utilizes steel shafts and sintered bronze bushings for the X, Y axis tables.  It also has a Z-axis vertical lift adjuster and one-handed X,Y adjustment.  

See a Video of this jig in action. 

See the process and more pictures here.

 

 



posted in: Reader's Gallery, jig


Comments (3)

GarageWoodworks GarageWoodworks writes: Jon - Good question. First, I thought it would be easier to insert clamps into a table that didn't have shafts below it. Second, I don't have to worry about the position of the lever ever interfering with clamped down work. Third, I can do really long bed rails if I wanted to (opposite end on a stand) and not have to worry about moving it around on two axes. (This would be challenging even with a Multi-Router).

It is a breeze to move the lever. You can move it with only two fingers with no problem; I've tried this :^)

Cheers!
Brian
Posted: 12:47 pm on October 13th

Jon H. Jon H. writes: Nice jig! Just out of curiosity, why did you chose to have the router move instead of the bed that holds the workpiece? Seems like there would be less stress on the bearings and the arms of the user if the lighter workpiece was the movable part instead of the heavy router part.

Thanks for posting, I'm feeling inspired!

Jon
Posted: 10:36 am on October 13th

GarageWoodworks GarageWoodworks writes: See a video of this jig in action here:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php

and here:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/31896/video-godzilla-the-horizontal-mortiser
Posted: 12:55 pm on October 12th

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