FWW Live: The sessions

comments (1) August 10th, 2012 in blogs

AsaC Asa Christiana, Special Projects Editor, Fine Woodworking magazine
thumbs up 2 users recommend

Rollie Johnson points out the difference between a regular Stanley and the Bedrock style (the one to look for!) in his seminar on rehabbing an old plane.
Michael Fortune shows how a simple tea kettle can be set up as a great steam source, as a bent lamination dries in the foreground, in his class, Five Ways to Bend Wood.
Garrett Hack offers a close-up of the scratch-stock blade he just made in his seminar on decorative details.
Attendees passed around the samples that Hack made.
After toting a half-dozen dry-fit pieces of furniture from his school in Pennsylania, Steve Latta was able to unlock the secrets of classic construction. Here he explains how he leaves his drawer runners short at the back so he can block-plane them in place, another genius tip from this talented teacher.
Mike Pekovich shared his foolproof method for honing plane irons and chisels and sharpening scrapers, all in 1-1/4 hours.
Pekovich spent an extra day of prep time making every attendee one of these scraper blocks, which holds the tool for both filing and burnishing. Our thanks to Engraving Arts for the custom branding iron!
And we chose sponsors who could demonstrate as well as our presenters could. Many thanks to the hard-working guys at Lee Valley and Lie-Nielsen, plus the three regional woodworking schools who were on hand to answer questions.
Rollie Johnson points out the difference between a regular Stanley and the Bedrock style (the one to look for!) in his seminar on rehabbing an old plane. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Rollie Johnson points out the difference between a regular Stanley and the Bedrock style (the one to look for!) in his seminar on rehabbing an old plane.


Just like practical woodworking advice is at the heart of FWW magazine and FineWoodworking.com, the lifeblood of FWW Live 2012 was the woodworking demonstrations. I'm sure it will be the same in the future.

We chose our most popular teachers and topics, kept class sizes small, and set up close-up video cameras and screens in every room, so attendees wouldn't miss a single subtlety. Because we do so much video at the Taunton Press, we were able to marshall six good shooters who know the content and what to zoom in on. At its heart FWW is a teaching organization, and we are extremely happy to have this new way to reach people. The print magazine can bring you beautiful photos and drawings, the website adds video to the mix, and now Fine Woodworking Live makes it all...live.


More from FWW Live
The first-ever FWW Live, as it happened

FWW Live: The fun stuff

 

Live means Q&As during and after each class, live means meaningful conversations over food and drinks, and live means real human connections and relationships, which we all need.

If you missed this one, I hope to see you at FWW Live 2013. It is sure to be another great one.



posted in: blogs, fine woodworking live, FWW Live


Comments (1)

bradpj53 bradpj53 writes: Two questions, really;

1) Will there be a Woodworking in the 18th Century in 2013? and,

2) When will date and location for FWW Live 2013 be announced? I have to get vacation requests in at work! Thanks -

Brad
Posted: 4:10 pm on October 19th

You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.

Advertise here for as little as $50. Learn how

Save up to 52% on Fine Woodworking

 

Become a Better Woodworker