Decorative stringing is just one of the details that make period furniture stand out from the crowd. The delicate, whimsical lines that adorn fine crafted furniture crafted date back to America’s infancy and have been copied by furniture makers ever since. With the right tools, and a bit of patience however, any intermediate-level furniture maker can tackle basic stringing.


stringingStringing Spans the Decades

Don’t be fooled into thinking stringing is a thing of the past, however. Stringing techniques are equally at home with more modern furniture as well. Be sure to follow this entire series for a demonstration of how furniture maker Steve Latta creates a streamlined butterfly motif that lends itself to more modern aesthetics.

 

1lineNOW PLAYING
Basic Stringing Techniques: Steve Latta outlines the tools required to excavate the crisp, clean channels required for accurate inlay work before demonstrating his techniques for cutting and thicknessing delicate stringing.
2lineAdvanced Stringing Techniques—Part I
Steve Latta outlines the tools required to excavate the crisp, clean channels required for accurate inlay work before demonstrating his techniques for cutting and thicknessing delicate stringing.
3lineAdvanced Stringing Techniques—Part II
Steve Latta completes his butterfly inlay by framing it within two concentric circles before capping things off with a series of plugs that mimic the insect's head.


Sources of Supply: Veneer: Berkshire Veneer, Foot Pedal: Peachtree Woodworking Supply, Endmills: Drill Technology, Monoject Syringe: Amazon, Dremel Base: Stewart-MacDonald