Tool Addicts

Tool Addicts

Your first sliding saw or cyclone might be a Grizzly

comments (2) July 16th, 2009 in blogs

AsaC Asa Christiana, Special Projects Editor, Fine Woodworking magazine
thumbs up 35 users recommend

Grizzly is offering a full-featured sliding tablesaw with a small footprint for only $2,600.
A small but mobile cyclone system is only $825.
Grizzly is offering a full-featured sliding tablesaw with a small footprint for only $2,600. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Grizzly is offering a full-featured sliding tablesaw with a small footprint for only $2,600.


There was a lot of buzz in the AWFS pressroom about Grizzly's new sliding tablesaw, the G0700. With a crosscut capacity up to 34 in. and the ability to accept a full dado set, it is squarely aimed at North American furnituremakers. Though it can't crosscut a full sheet of plywood, it does include a fully adjustable scoring blade for tearout-free cuts of panel goods. And the footprint is about the same as a standard cabinetsaw.

What is also about the same as a standard cabinetsaw is the price tag, a surprisingly low $2,600. This is true European-style sliding tablesaw, with a table that sits right up against the blade and runs on ball bearings and hardened steel ways. It also has a Euro-style riving knife system. The blade cover pictured on this production protoype will be replaced by a clear one, making it easier to line up cuts. Other nice features are an arbor lock for blade changes and cast-iron trunnions. There is dust collection above and below the table.

If you haven't tried a sliding tablesaw, you'll be surprised at how versatile they are. For one thing, you can throw away your shopmade crosscut sleds. This is a lot of machine for the price; you'll just have to wait until the end of the year for the final production models to be ready for shipping.

On the dust-collection front, Grizzly is offering a shockingly low-priced cyclone, which seems to have all the features a hobbyist needs (the G0703), including a 0.2-micron filter for the most dangerous dust, with crank-and-flapper system that unclogs it. The motor is only 1-1/2-hp, but the whole thing is one a roller stand, meaning you can move it from amchine to machine to keep your hose runs short and the suction high. The price tag: $825. And it includes a remote control. Bill Crofutt of Grizzly said they expect this cyclone to be very popular for folks with basement or one-car-garage shops. I agree. This one will be available sooner than the sliding saw, but you'll still have to wait a few months. 



posted in: blogs, workshop, tool


Comments (2)

gt67 gt67 writes: Looks great. When will other manufacturers add saw stop or similar technology?
Seems as if I will be really sad if I buy this machine and cut my finger.

Q. I use a woodpeck table saw fence for the great measuring system. Do these sliding saws have anything similar?
Posted: 9:34 am on July 22nd

Jointerman Jointerman writes: Oh snap! I just bought my G0623X last week! This is the saw that I'd really find useful, but it's just a few hundred dollars different from what I paid and can crosscut a full sheet of plywood if I needed. A clear blade cover would be seriously nice. I hope they sell a retrofit.
Posted: 7:44 pm on July 16th

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If you enjoy woodworking then you probably also suffer from an addiction to tools. Whether you collect hand planes or seek out the latest and greatest in power tools, our expert tool addicts will keep you in the loop with news, reviews, and commentary on the latest in woodworking tools.

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