Seth Rolland’s striking table is at once timeless because of its classic demilune form, yet playful and modern in its curved, flared slats, which are created much like the way you would cut and unfold paper dolls. But the execution is anything but child’s play. Creative bandsawing and careful cleanup are the keys to this organic table.

For more on Rolland and his work, view our Pro Portfolio audio slideshow on the Slicing Maestro. Plus, see his work on the back cover of Fine Woodworking #213.

rolland table

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Back-and-forth cuts establish pattern. After cutting dadoes in one end, Rolland makes a stopped cut, then moves the fence and flips the board end for end for the second cut. He continues across the board with the uncut side always registered against the fence.


rolland table

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Shape the slats. After making all thestopped cuts, he stands the board on edge, holding it together with gentle hand pressure, and cuts the scoops on the top and bottom edges.


rolland table

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Cleaning between slats. Rolland has to get creative to reach into the tight corners between the slats. To get in the crevices, he attaches a scraper blade (with sandpaper taped to it) to a Fein MultiMaster tool.


rolland table

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rolland table

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An easy glue-up. Working with the tabletop upside down on a sheet of glass, Rolland glues curved disks into the two dadoes.


rolland table

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He clamps the walnut disks and the outermost members of the fan in place, and then places weights on the other pieces while the glue dries.


Photos: Matt Kenney