Workshop Safety

Woodworking is a solitary hobby, and it requires tools and techniques that are inherently dangerous. These two factors make workshop safety a top concern for any woodworker. When working in the shop it is important to protect your eyes, ears, and lungs,
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  • Tying Down Lumber for TransportVideo: Tying Down Lumber for Transport

    with Gary Williams

    Learn the bowline knot and other tips for tying down lumber

  • Using a Benchtop BenchVideo: Using a Benchtop Bench

    with Jeff Miller

    See how to use Jeff Miller's unique minibench for routing and handwork. The elevated bench raises the action to a comfortable height.

  • Cutting It Close SafelyCutting It Close Safely

    by Steve Latta

    An expert at installing inlay describes proven methods for working with delicate materials. Latta''s tips, such as how to set a fence to cut multiple moldings from ...

  • Seeing Better in the ShopSeeing Better in the Shop

    by Jeff Miller

    In the shop, it might take more than eyeglasses to get everything in focus. Woodworking poses visual challenges; here is a presentation of products that will help ...

  • Safety is Rule OneSafety is Rule One

    by Michael Dunbar

    This quick guide to safety can help you keep all your digits safe and sound. Your goal should be to ensure that any injuries you incur are slight, the sort you ...

  • PVC Pipe Dangers DebunkedPVC Pipe Dangers Debunked

    by Rod Cole

    Home-shop dust collection is a controversial topic, primiarily because of the safety of PVC pipe in this application. Some claim that sparks in PVC pipe due to ...

  • Protect Your Hearing in the ShopProtect Your Hearing in the Shop

    by William Duckworth

    The biggest challenge makers of hearing protectors face is making the devices comfortable enough that people will actually use them. This article details how the ...

  • Prevent Injury to Your Hands, Wrists and ForearmsPrevent Injury to Your Hands, Wrists and Forearms

    by Thomas P. LeRoy

    Physical therapist Thomas P. LeRoy talks about hand, wrist, and forearm injuries and suggests simple ways to minimize them when working wood. Hand sizes, flexibility, ...

  • Tying Down LumberTying Down Lumber

    by Gary Williams

    There are tricks to keeping lumber from taking flight when transporting it from the lumberyard, and most of them are simple, writes Gary Williams. In this article, ...

  • A Low-Cost Spray BoothA Low-Cost Spray Booth

    by Jeff Jewitt

    Jeff Jewitt explains how to build a knock-down booth for high-volume, low-pressure spray equipment that will safely ventilate your workspace. A knockdown booth ...

  • Preventing Tablesaw KickbackPreventing Tablesaw Kickback

    by Lon Schleining

    Before he lets students near a tablesaw, Lon Schleining shows them how dangerous kickback can be. A split-second series of photos shows Schleining’s demonstration. ...

  • Pain-Free WoodworkingPain-Free Woodworking

    by Thomas P. LeRoy

    Thomas P. LeRoy, a physical therapist and woodworker, offers tips on how to stand and work properly to avoid pain down the line. He explains how to stand in a neutral ...

  • Safe Procedures at the TablesawSafe Procedures at the Tablesaw

    by Howard Lewin

    Howard Lewin tries to arm himself with knowledge of what a tablesaw is likely to do and then stop it before it happens. Here, he discusses kickback, splitters, ...

  • Woodworkers' First Aid(1)Woodworkers' First Aid(1)

    by Alan Marco

    Alan Marco, M.D., explains what to do in the event of an accident so that you have a plan. Being prepared might save an eye or a lot of blood. First, he addresses ...

  • Routing Safe and SoundRouting Safe and Sound

    by Patrick Warner

    7 tips to keep your hand-held router under control, your workpiece intact and your first-aid kit closed

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