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Re: Turn a Block of Wood into a Box of Money

His painting skills are beyond belief. The carving is spectacular but the detail of the painting is what makes the project come to life. I wonder how he paints such fine detail on the lower levels of his work???

Re: How Does a Fine Woodworker Change a Lightbulb?

I agree with HappyHacker, he needs to spend a little time fixing the ceiling around that fixture.
Other than that, neat ladder, should have flat steps for better stability. But, I guess if you are going to build a ladder every time you need to change a bulb that's the fastest way to do it.

Also he should have a backup bulb in case the other one in the box isn't any good.

Re: It's impossible to cheat at woodworking

Matt;
The jerk probably wasn't even a woodworker to start with. If it were cheating we would all be guilty. I think it would be a fair statement to say that at one time or another we've ALL come up with our own way of doing something, does that make it cheating?? BTW Who was he to set the standard of what is and isn't.
The end product is all that counts and boys if you want to lie about how you got there, that's between you and your workbench. The only "misrepresentation" would be if you bought it and passed it off as yours. That is cheating!

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

There are some people in this country that would sue if they hung their toilet paper upside down.

My saw (as do all machines) came with a manual that clearly states "Keep your fingers away from the blade as serious injury may result" So... if your dumb enough to stick your hand in a meat grinder don't complain when it hands you hamburg back.

I would love to see the SawStop technology on all saws. It's a shame the industry did not see the wisdom in doing so when they were offered it. Now they SHOULD have to pay dearly for it.

As to those of you who that can afford machines like that, good for you. I have a cheap (old) Craftsman. I know enough to respect my tools regardless of what the name on them is. I also own several Ryobi tools, they make a fine tool. Woodworking is my hobby not my livelihood. If I had to make a living with them I would probably spend the extra on better machines. Then again if it were my livelihood I could probably afford them too.

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

There are some people in this country that would sue if they hung their toilet paper upside down.

My saw (as do all machines) came with a manual that clearly states "Keep your fingers away from the blade as serious injury may result" So... if your dumb enough to stick your hand in a meat grinder don't complain when it hands you hamburg back.

I would love to see the SawStop technology on all saws. It's a shame the industry did not see the wisdom in doing so when they were offered it. Now they SHOULD have to pay dearly for it.

As to those of you who that can afford machines like that, good for you. I have a cheap (old) Craftsman. I know enough to respect my tools regardless of what the name on them is. I also own several Ryobi tools, they make a fine tool. Woodworking is my hobby not my livelihood. If I had to make a living with them I would probably spend the extra on better machines. Then again if it were my livelihood I could probably afford them too.

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

There are some people in this country that would sue if they hung their toilet paper upside down.

My saw (as do all machines) came with a manual that clearly states "Keep your fingers away from the blade as serious injury may result" So... if your dumb enough to stick your hand in a meat grinder don't complain when it hands you hamburg back.

I would love to see the SawStop technology on all saws. It's a shame the industry did not see the wisdom in doing so when they were offered it. Now they SHOULD have to pay dearly for it.

As to those of you who that can afford machines like that, good for you. I have a cheap (old) Craftsman. I know enough to respect my tools regardless of what the name on them is. I also own several Ryobi tools, they make a fine tool. Woodworking is my hobby not my livelihood. If I had to make a living with them I would probably spend the extra on better machines. Then again if it were my livelihood I could probably afford them too.

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

There are some people in this country that would sue if they hung their toilet paper upside down.

My saw (as do all machines) came with a manual that clearly states "Keep your fingers away from the blade as serious injury may result" So... if your dumb enough to stick your hand in a meat grinder don't complain when it hands you hamburg back.

I would love to see the SawStop technology on all saws. It's a shame the industry did not see the wisdom in doing so when they were offered it. Now they SHOULD have to pay dearly for it.

As to those of you who that can afford machines like that, good for you. I have a cheap (old) Craftsman. I know enough to respect my tools regardless of what the name on them is. I also own several Ryobi tools, they make a fine tool. Woodworking is my hobby not my livelihood. If I had to make a living with them I would probably spend the extra on better machines. Then again if it were my livelihood I could probably afford them too.

Re: Is it OK to sell furniture based on FWW articles?

I subscribe to a number of woodworking magazines. The reason I buy so many is because I like diversity. Each has something different to learn from. Like a large number of us still learning, I build what is is offered. You can call it copying, I call it learning. Once I've mastered the concept I set out to build my own version of it if I find it worthy of being sold to someone. The problem comes when someone does it in mass production for resale. The "free plans" were not intended for that purpose. Sell your own version of it. In a sense we all copy, "originals" were built by our earliest ancestors, I don't care if it's a bookcase or a rocking chair. The "original" concept came from the early dawn of woodworking and were made out of necessity, not hobby.
If it were not for the "free" plans, some of us would never have ventured into woodworking in the first place. I applaud those who offer their plans to others to build from. It shows the true spirit of woodworking.

Re: Is it OK to sell furniture based on FWW articles?

I subscribe to a number of woodworking magazines. The reason I buy so many is because I like diversity. Each has something different to learn from. Like a large number of us still learning, I build what is is offered. You can call it copying, I call it learning. Once I've mastered the concept I set out to build my own version of it if I find it worthy of being sold to someone. The problem comes when someone does it in mass production for resale. The "free plans" were not intended for that purpose. Sell your own version of it. In a sense we all copy, "originals" were built by our earliest ancestors, I don't care if it's a bookcase or a rocking chair. The "original" concept came from the early dawn of woodworking and were made out of necessity, not hobby.
If it were not for the "free" plans, some of us would never have ventured into woodworking in the first place. I applaud those who offer their plans to others to build from. It shows the true spirit of woodworking.



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