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Re: The Most Incredible Table You'll Ever See

Design,& fabrication are beautiful, but they rely on 21st century high tech and process automation. Traditional woodworking tools and skills are not present. So this is exquisite but sterile.. As for the wood, they may as well have used plastic laminate. There is not one element that speaks of the human touch.

Non sequitur. Why are the recommended articles shown just below this taken from Fine Homebuilding ad not a Fine Woodworking perspective?

Re: UPDATE: 3 Book Giveaway! Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to...

Some of us have been subscribers since the get go. We've also bought most of the books you have published. So how about giving the monthly winner a choice of books, books, DVDS, plans. Anything up to whatever value you assign? Or better yet, since most of your books are available in the market place and really don't qualify as unique, how about awarding a copy of an out of print Taunton book?

Re: Turn a Block of Wood into a Box of Money

Without a doubt the essence is in the painting.

Re: Turn a Block of Wood into a Box of Money

Without a doubt the essence is in the painting.

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

This may work, but the result will be aesthetically unacceptable. Just imagine a gap of more than 1/8" top and bottom of the drawer.better to use realistic moisture differences, not worst case.

One way to accomplish this is to control the humidity in the shop at a level approximating the average humidity at the furniture's ultimate location. If it is actually going to be in a very high humidity region that does not mean it will be absent any climate control. So an item slated to go from Connecticut to Louisiana or sub-Saharan Africa will more than likely reside in an air conditioned space. If somebody were to purchase a Hack demilune and keep it at 16% humidity, there will be worse problems than sticky.

Controlling the shop's humidity can be as easy as using a portable humidifier and a hydrometer. You could automate that with a humidistat, or go whole hog and add humidity control to a forced air HVAC system.

Even when automated you still can use your meter to make sure that your lumber has reached equilibrium with the environment.

Re: Crisp Tenon Shoulders with Your Chisel

Bob, you must mean photos 5 and.6.

Phil's not using a dado blade. Photo 4 shows a saw blade, and Phil makes that point in the write up.

Over the years I have tried to align my power tools yo pinpoint accuracy so as to be able to make simple joints without resorting to hand tools. For me it almost never results in a precise crisp joint that satisfies me. So I rely on a saw and a chisel, rabbet plane and shoulder plane for most every operation. There
Is only one imperative that was not mentioned. Very sharp tools are required. What is very sharp? It is sharp enough to do the task. So skip the foolish terms such as scary sharp and hone your edges so they slice cleanly, easily and leave a polished surface in the end grain. I call that sharp enough. You can call it what you can call it whatever you like.

Re: Crisp Tenon Shoulders with Your Chisel

Bob, you must mean photos 5 and.6.

Phil's not using a dado blade. Photo 4 shows a saw blade, and Phil makes that point in the write up.

Over the years I have tried to align my power tools yo pinpoint accuracy so as to be able to make simple joints without resorting to hand tools. For me it almost never results in a precise crisp joint that satisfies me. So I rely on a saw and a chisel, rabbet plane and shoulder plane for most every operation. There
Is only one imperative that was not mentioned. Very sharp tools are required. What is very sharp? It is sharp enough to do the task. So skip the foolish terms such as scary sharp and hone your edges so they slice cleanly, easily and leave a polished surface in the end grain. I call that sharp enough. You can call it what you can call it whatever you like.

Re: UPDATE: Best Workshops from the editors of Fine Woodworking

FWW again demonstrates its claim to be the ultimate recycler. We happily pay them for material we have previously read in our FWW magazines, and which are available on the members' web site, for which we also pay. If you think you need this repackaged material right away get it from the library. If your need is not immediate, buy it used at Alibris. For charter or long-time subscribers this is equivalent to owning all of the Beatles album and then buying a CD of the Beatles' Greatest Hits from the Michael Jackson estate. (Jackson bought the rights years before his death.). If I win, it will be available at auction.

Re: Fine Woodworking On the Road: Come out and see us

This discussion is rather trivial. Why don't we just shelve the topic? jdmaher has it right: ADVERTISING. Giving a free plug to Phil Lowe's & Jeff Miller's ongoing classes is not relevant to the road show listing. Note also the large number of listings for the Marc Adams school. It's commendable that these editors are invited more for their draw than for their expertise - and their services are not free. It is naive to think otherwise.
Let's expand on the last. Classes are very expensive. I live within 50 miles of Phil Lowe's workshop. However, rush hour traffic precludes the possibility of commuting for anything but one-day sessions. It doesn't take much imagination to realize that the high cost of tuition is compounded by the high cost of food and lodging. It is of course the same for all instruction away from home. What's the point? Most woodworkers can't afford these lessons.
FWW's entry into the annual woodworker's koffee klatsch weekend arena is a case in point, and it wasn't that nexpensive. The response was good, but hardly overwhelming. Nobody had to be turned away because of a massive rush for tickets. I would have gone but decided that I'd rather buy a good toll than spend the money on accommodations.
If you have read this far, I thank you. Only one comment remains. It would be wonderful if these sessions were made available digitally, but let's not get carried away. We should expect to pay for them just like the attendees. I leave the choice of format - live feed, DVD or download, buy or rent - to the publisher. That I can afford.

Re: It's impossible to cheat at woodworking

I am most comfortable with the attitudes expressed by dags and tails1st. The remark was almost certainly made in jest, but it really placed a lot of people on the defensive. I employ power tools extensively, more so as I grow older and more feeble. My approach is to use power tools for the heavy lifting. I use hand tools (generally old ones) for fine tuning and doing things that can't be done with power tools (yes they do exist) or which are more efficiently done with hand tools. Hand tools require little or no setup time, which adds to their appeal.
Jigs are a separate issue. Many hand tools are jigs. A plane is no more than a guided chisel jig. You can fill in the rest. Old time craftsmen routinely used jigs. The most familiar are the bench hook, the shooting board and bench dogs. So jigs are not cheating. They lead to efficiency, quality and uniformity.
Finally, everyone should reflect on dags boatbuilding instructors belief that you should learn to do some basic operations by hand before you escalate to jigs or power tools. I have learned more about the materials we work with by learning to do them with hand tools.
So what is cheating? Corked baseball bats, steroids, copying on an exam, not crediting your sources, perhaps assembling furniture from kits...I hope you get it.

Re: How to make a "solid wood" top from plywood

So you are saying that poplar is popular for veneer backing.

Just couldn't resist the opportunity to chide the editor who relies on the spell checker. After all, if this detail is incorrect by poor oversight, is it not conceivable that important details may also be stated incorrectly?

Re: Shop Talk Live 17: Behind-the-Scenes at Lee Valley Tools

Saw stop mechanism activating and wiping out a blade.

Radio type interviews are good on NPR because they are dealing with ideas and facts that require no visualization. Touring a tool factory without being able to view the process is a waste of time.

Re: Free Plan: Krenovian Clamp Rack on Wheels

Beneath the standards of Fine Woodworking and its readers. Please don't talk down to us. This hardly belongs in your newbie newsletter. No original ideas in this design; no challenge in the construction. built a similar war horse out of scrap years ago, without plans.

Re: UPDATE: Making a Welsh Stick Chair with Hugh Roberts

The odds are so much better than the lottery. Why not give Welsh chairs a try?

Re: Veritas Introduces New Tool Steel for Plane Blades and Chisels

Everything I could have written has already been posted, so I will close with a query of my own. Is this what they mean by "cutting edge" technology?

Re: General Consolidates Operations, Closes its Canadian Factory

General should take a lot of the heat. Their distribution network in the US is imperceptible. Their prices were outrageously high. Even their General International was priced above Powermatic. Very few nonprofessional woodworkers could justify or afford the outlay. Too bad for the elitists who yearn for the good old days. They're not coming back. Live with it.

Re: UPDATE: Windsor Chairmaking by James Mursell

You should do giveaways every month, especially ones tha treat more advanced topics.

Re: Win a 10-in. jointer-planer from Austria

I have nothing against FB, but when I followed the links, the best I could do was get to the drawing only to find a dark gray curtain over the the page.

Re: Caption Contest Winner!

Not a god idea.


the contest I mean. Feel sorry for you editors who have to select one from over 300 scintillating entries each month. Let's stick to woodworking. We do that best.

Re: Is the Radial Arm Saw on its Last Legs?

I hate to be at the tail end. Everything that can be said about the topic probably has been said, but I can't resist defending an old friend.

I bought mine in the late 1960s. It was my first stationary tool, a Craftsman. Two casualties: (1) burned up the motor very early on because of dull saw blade (no carbide then); (2) got a slight laceration between thumb and forefinger while rushing a crosscut. Have had nothing but success ever since. I still have the saw (and another later model as well).

I use the saw for its versatility. One of my earliest projects was a series of 8 foot high interior shutters. Used the molding head and the dado head for ornamentation and coped joints. Even made a coping sled.

I dis see the need early on for a table saw for ripping. Other than with sheet goods I could not get it to cut a straight line or get through thick hardwood without stalling.

The one complaint I had (past tense) was alignment: squareness to the table and and the yoke. Invariably this problem was triggered by my allowing the saw to to climb and stall on a crosscut of thick lumber. It finally dawned on me that I was not sufficient torque.when tightening up the cap screws that are relaxed during the alignment. Nowadays I check the alignment about once every three months, but haven't had to make an adjustment in a very lonmg time (probably years, but I don't keep track. In addition to using more torque, I take extra care to ensure that I have a sharp carbide blade installed to minimize those crosscut climbing episodes.

Re: Miracle Shield Blocks Kickback

No hints necessary. I knew it was a fake right away. Rube Goldberg died years ago!

Re: Poll: What accessories, jigs, and shop gear are on your holiday wish list?

You can never have too many clamps.

You can always remove more dust.

Re: Poll: What hand tools are on your holiday wish list?

As I grow older I tend more and more to appreciate hand craftsmanship. I have a lot of edged tools, antique and contemporary. don't need any more, so my list reflects an appreciation for beuty as well as utility. Besides, my sveral LN planes and saws are eager to make new friends.

Re: Poll: Any Machinery on your Holiday Wish List?

After more than 40 years of woodworking, I have nearly everything, so this planer represents an upgrade, not a must have.

Re: Bench Cookie Giveaway

Simple solution to vexing problem.



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