cocobolo1


member




Recent comments


Re: Grizzly Shipping to Canada

I had previously understood that Grizzly did not ship to Canada due to some sort of an agreement they had with Busy Bee tools. I do not know if this is absolutely correct or not.

However, my experience with UPS shipping from the States into Canada has been that they are outrageously expensive on their "brokerage" fees. In view of the fact that just about everything comes into Canada duty free, I find these fees to be nothing but outright greed.

I received an item from California on which the shipping was $80. The "brokerage" was another $80 also. If the item had come via the U.S.P.S. the brokerage simply wouldn't exist. We may get nailed for the regular taxes, which is fair enough. But there are no other charges added on.

I have my own policy now with anything that comes up from the US, if you can't send it by your postal service, I don't want it.

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

Some of the comments here are funny. I didn't read them all so it wouldn't taint my perspective.

Some are kind of out in left field. Many are interesting in the extreme.

I have a Ryobi tablesaw under the Craftsman name. It's been a beauty. It cuts wood for me just fine...and no doubt if I was dumb enough to shove my fingers through the blade it would cut them too.

I realise that lawyers love this stuff, after all, it's how they make their ripoff living.

From my last sentence, you can probably tell I don't have much patience for this sort of garbage. It is typical of how Americans think. You may not like that but it's true.

Really, what was the jury thinking? 1.5 million? For a cut or two? If I had a dollar for every sliver of wood that has got stuck in my hands I'b be a millionaire. Who do I sue for that? The people that grow the trees? The retailers of wood? God?

I did enjoy the tax comment...lovely! It's not the guy doing the suing who will get all the cash...it's the lawyers and government! What a scam.

Come on. It's about time you got a little realistic here.

That's like saying that every available safety feature must be installed on every car built, isn't it?

You wanna play with wood? Be careful.

My 53 years of woodworking experience have not included getting my fingers mangled by a tablesaw blade. And with continued common sense, it never will.

Re: New Hand Tools: Happy Holidays to Me

Patrick:
I just joined up here, and you have the privilege of getting my first post, you lucky dog you.
I've been messing about with wood for more than 50 years, and I was trying to think which tools I use the most and couldn't live without.
Luckily, most of my tools have been in the stable for a few years and didn't cost anywhere near as much as they do today.
As far as hand tools go, chisels are at the top of my list. I have the cheapest and the most expensive and everything in between. Any of these guys can be brought to a good sharp edge given a little care and time. I have a pretty good selection of water stones and the stone pond from L.V. It's nowhere near as good as they would have you believe. Save your money.
You need something to keep the stones flat, so the nagura helps there.
I don't have that lovely dovetail saw you have, I have been using Japanese saws for years and quite like them.
As far as planes and scrapers go I've lost track of how many. I often seem to gravitate to my low angle block plane, definitely couldn't be without that. Have a few old Stanleys and several newer planes and shaves. I must admit I don't use scrapers that much, but I'm just getting into building bass guitars, so that may change pretty quick.
Mustn't forget to mention marking and measuring tools. I much prefer to use a good steel rule over a tape measure (when it's long enough) and must have at least a dozen of them, the longest I think is either 30 or 36".
And a nice accurate small square is indispensable. I have the steel ones (again from LV) and some nice wood ones I made up some time back.
Now what I really need is time. Where can I get more of that?



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