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Tippler Clocks

I call these "tippler clocks" because there's always time (at the end of the day) for a tipple. These are three of 26 clocks made from planks salvaged from a 100-year-old-barn. Complete with paint...



Recent comments


Re: Is the Radial Arm Saw on its Last Legs?

I have TWO radial arm saws (one only used with a dado blade) which I use every day. I wouldn't be without them. They're deadly-accurate and just as safe to use as my table saw with no guard, riving knife or 'saw stop'. Rads will do anything slip-slider chop saws will do and a lot more. Great tools!

Re: Tablesaw Tenoning Jig

Bad idea. I don't want a steel bar clamp anywhere near a spinning table saw blade. We cut perfect tenons on the bandsaw - in complete safety with almost no setup time. The bandsaw tooth marks left on the tenon faces provide extra mechanical lockup for the glue joint.

Re: Pattern-Routing Jig

We use similar jigs to cut tapered table legs on the bandsaw and table saw. They work.

Re: Man Wins Big Money in Tablesaw Lawsuit

Yet another frivolous court decision. Isn't it too bad that stupidity isn't painful?

Re: Dovetailed drawers are overrated

Bullfeathers!
Dovetails, tenon joints and other nifty woodworking tweaks may be just the thing if you're an artsy/craftsy woodbutcher. But, after more than 50 years of eking out what passes for a living as a carpenter who gets paid by the job, I wouldn't trade my drills and dowel stock for anything else. Never had a joint or drawer fail yet and I have a whole whack of them in daily service.

Re: What's your favorite hand or power tool?

The tool I reach for most is my Japanese cranked-neck paring chisel which I bought - used - nearly 40 years ago. From cleaning off the tops of screw plugs to fine-tuning tenons and shaving end-grain, it can't be beat. I even use it to clean out mortices after drilling. I keep it scary sharp. An apprentice used it once despite my dire warning about even thinking about touching my tools. The dolt dropped it and nicked the blade. I damn near cried when I found out. Took me a long time to restore the edge. It now rests in my locked tool chest whenever I'm not using it.

Re: Tippler Clocks

I've always been fascinated with the Shaker style. It makes the most of the wood I have to work with and it can be easily adapted to almost any application from a box to a kitchen to a house. Though they don't know it, my two favorite mentors who taught me a great deal about designing and building in the Shaker tradition were Christian Becksvoort and Norm Abrams. When I grow up I want to be just like those two great craftsmen - I'm pushing 70.

Re: Making a Roubo Workbench: Part 2

Why go to all this time, trouble and expense? I've been using benches similar to the Joshua Finn bench shown in FW "Tools and Shops Annual" for my shop work and finish carpentry on job sites for 40 years. Essentially, one or more box beams on stands or, in my case, saw horses. Flat, light, cheap, super-strong, easy to move and store with a lot more uses than any other bench I've seen. When they're too worn for cabinet work mine become scaffold stages, ramps or bridges over troubled water (pot holes).
Old Fox Woodworks



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