Killenwood

Tim Killen, Orinda, CA, US
contributor


I am retired from Bechtel Corporation after 36 years in Engineering and IT management. I grew up among woodworking machinery in Centerville, Ohio - both my father and grandfather had wood shops. I became interested in reproduction of 18th C furniture and have built several homes full of examples over the last 40 years. You can see some of these pieces on my website at http://killenwood.com.

I began working with SketchUp more than three years ago. After using various 2D CAD systems over the years, I wanted 3D modeling capability for furniture design. I am now an avid SketchUp user - I will not touch a piece of lumber in the shop without first having a detail model including all joints defined. I like how I can display various views of my design and produce full-scale patterns for marking out lumber. It also lets me test build the piece by connecting each component in sequence.

This tool has improved my woodworking ability, and I am interested in sharing features and capabilities that enable this improvement.

Gender: Male

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Contributions

From Dovetails to Mortise & Tenon

This model was made by a friend, David Heim. I will be using his model to create a multi-page shop drawing for my students. David created the model from sketches by Lester Margon in his book...

Lid Support for Stand-up Desk

Dave Richards and I frequently encourage modeling new components in the context of the overall furniture assembly. This most likely results in more efficiency and accuracy. In the following video...

A Sculptured Stool

I've finished construction of the standup desk, and now need the stool to match. In this video I'll show how I created the shaped back piece in the stool. This will involve standard SketchUp tools...

A Classic Bench from a Picture

In this video, I'll show how I modeled up a classic outdoor bench for the school. The school decided on a picture that I import into SketchUp. I use the "Use as a Matched Photo" option for...

A Wooden Hinge for the Stand-up Desk

I'm currently building this sculptured stand-up desk in the shop. The construction includes a full-length wooden hinge for the lid. Here is the SketchUp model with the lid closed and openIve...

Williamsburg - Egg & Dart Carving

Each year since retirement, I've been attending the Williamsburg Conference on "Working Wood in the 18th Century". It has always been educational, instructional, and inspirational. After each year, I...

Re-creating a Missing Component

In my first book, "SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers", Chapter 5 covers the subject "Learn to Draw Precisely". For practicing this drawing skill, I ask the reader to reproduce the Right End froma...

How Far with SketchUp - Sculpturing?

I'm working on this modern style stand-up desk. The joinery and sculpturing are quite different than my normal 18th C. or Shaker styles. In this view, I'm not showing much of the sculpturing and...

A Dimension Strategy for a Modern Chair

This is a modern style living room chair (albeit without the upholstery cushions). I'm doing two of these currently in the shop. It has some complex geometry and many bed-bolt mortise and tenon...

Pictures to Replicate a Piece of Furniture

Often woodworkers have a piece of furniture that they would like to replicate. A few photographs imported to SketchUp can enable this process, but it helps to know what pictures to take and at what...

Futures in the Shop - Real and Imagined

The previous discussion on the shop drawing package sparked my thinking about what we might expect in the future. Today, I think we can agree that "paper" is most often what we find useful in the...

Growth of the Shop Drawing Package

I'm surprised at my having such a large package of paper in the shop these days. It grows by the day, and now takes a big binder clip to keep all the sheets together. It didn't used to be this way...

Sheraton Desk - Applying Veneer Textures

This is a desk I'm currently re-producing, based on a Sheraton piece at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.   I have not started the finishing on this project yet. I will not be dying or staining...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 8

In the last session, I modified the bow by tapering the end and extending the tenon through to the bottom face of the seat. In the process of making the bow, I also created the bow steam bending...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair in SketchUp - Part 7

In the last session, I created the steam-bent bow, based on a shape developed by eye, since there was no drawing or information in the magazine article. There is more work on the bow that I will show...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 6

I've finished the seat and undercarriage, now the top part of the Windsor Chair is remaining work to do. That means steam bending a bow and turning some spindles. Unfortunately, the Fine Woodworking...

A Sheraton Desk - Making the tapered and fluted legs

This is a shift from the series on making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair. I'm currently in the shop doing an 18th Century Sheraton Desk, and want to show how I made the complex leg in SketchUp. This...

Making a Bowback Windsor Chair - Part 5

In the last episode, we completed the undercarriage of the chair with the legs and stretchers in place and connected to the seat. At this stage of design you could begin construction of the chair...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 4

In the last session, I positioned the legs at their respective angles to the seat face. We used angles specified by the Fine Woodworking article and used the sight lines as reference faces for those...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 3

In the last session, I compiled the Windsor seat component with spindle and leg sockets. I also carved a gutter decoration separating the spindle socket platform from the front of the seat. I also...

Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 2

This is Part 2 of "Making an Un-braced Bowback Windsor Chair". Last time I showed the tracing of the magazine drawing of the seat. And we made three components from these tracings - the plain seat...

Modeling a Windsor Bowback Side Chair

I'm starting a new series on modeling a Windsor Chair. I've selected one of the simpler Windsor styles, the unbraced Bowback. This particular chair was described by Harriet Hodges in a Fine...

Williamsburg Knife Box - Part 7

In the last lesson (Part 6), I showed how to make and install the Handle or the Middle Spar. This is the last of a series on the Williamsburg Knife Box, and it covers the wrap around small edge...

Williamsburg Knife Box - Part 6

We're getting close to the end of this series - one more to do after this one, covering the base molding. In this penultimate part, we will add the Handle to the existing assembly of the Knife Box...

Knife Box - Williamsburg, Part 5

In the last blog post (Part 4), I showed making the dovetail pins in the Side component. In this video, I show how to use these already-made pins to create the matching tails in the End...

Knife Box - Williamsburg, Part 4

In the last Part 3 of this series, I showed making the full-length Side and End components for the Williamsburg Knife Box. I also copied and flipped these components and placed on a full width box...

Knife Box - Williamsburg, Part 3

This is Part 3 of a series of videos on building the Williamsburg Knife Box. In the previous blog entry, I showed the making of the half length symmetrical End and Side components, and ensuring that...

Knife Box - Williamsburg, Part 2

My last blog entry set the stage for building this Knife Box, one that was presented at the January Williamsburg conference "Working Wood in the 18th Century". This video is second in the series...

Knife Box - Williamsburg Conference

Here's a worthy challenge for woodworkers using SketchUp. Modeling this Williamsburg Knife Box requires execution of most key SketchUp Tools and features. The Box's compound angles, bold scroll...

Lady's Travelling Box - Williamsburg Conference

At this week's conference "Working Wood in the 18th Century" in Colonial Williamsburg, I was intrigued by Brian Weldy's presentation on Thomas Sheraton's drawing representations of the Ladys...

Chamfered Post Table Mortise & Tenon Joints

I probably receive the most comments on my eBook "SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers" in the section of Chapter Nine covering mortise & tenon joints in the Chamfered Post Table. To help show the...

A Toolbox for Cub Scouts

Here is a quick project, both in SketchUp and in the shop. The project is a simple toolbox nailed together without special joinery. It has been designed to use with a group of Cub Scouts without use...

Designing in SketchUp - a Planing Sled

Next semester I will be teaching a hand tools class at an adult education school with a complete woodworking shop. However, the workbenches (salvaged from a middle school) are in terribly bad shape...

Axes Location - Adirondack Chair

Our local woodworking group (Diablo Woodworkers) will be making several Adirondacks for a Sierra Camp for kids with cancer. I've just finished the design in SketchUp and will use it as an example for...

Carving (Branding) the Lowboy

My previous blog entry showed a video of the building of the Philadelphia Lowboy in SketchUp. Several of the components in the SketchUp model showed the carving that is typical of these pieces. These...

Building a Philadelphia Lowboy

Below I've attached a video showing how the lowboy is constructed piece-by-piece. I've taken advantage of the SketchUp capability to reposition the axes on components. When right-clicking on the...

Jig Design Enabled with SketchUp

Judging by the high number of articles and blogs on jig design, there must be considerable woodworker time and effort in making shop helpers or jigs. Just as SketchUp is used for design and construction of...

Outfitting a Desk Drawer

The following video shows how I outfitted a desk drawer. It includes placing the mortise lock and creating a pencil/pen trough. The placement of the lock is facilitated by prior modeling of the...

Shortening a "take-apart" Child's Table

Recently I worked on a "knock-down" take-apart child's table and chair. After completing the design of the table, I realized it was 4-inches too long. In my new book, "SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers...

A Glue-up Procedure for a Desk

Gluing a complex piece of furniture can be a challenge. For me, it usually entails development of a thoughtful plan. Often, the first plan won't work - after walking through the steps, I often run...

Creating and Editing Tenon Peg Holes

Recently a reader on Knots Forum asked how to create and edit tenon pins on a mortise and tenon joint. Specifically, the reader wanted to know how to change the size of the tenon peg after already...

Sometimes a Hand Sketch Helps

Recently I was trying to shape a profile for a turned drawer knob in SketchUp. I created a rectangular face and drew the centerline. I then started with the Line and Arc Tools to create the shape of...

Starting a Modern Danish Style Desk

I'm starting a new project for the grandchildren - desks. Modern Danish style seems to work well in this case, so I'm working on the SketchUp model for the interesting shapes of the legs. There is a...

Managing Your Preferences Template

Managing your preferences template can be more complicated than simply clicking on "Save As Template". Perhaps you - as I am accustomed to do - on occasion modify your SketchUp Preferences Template...

Starting a New Project

More often now, I'm starting new projects with a search for images (photos). I , or a member of my family, has an idea for a new furniture project. There may be a picture in a book, newspaper or...

Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

My second book on using SketchUp is now available in the Fine Woodworking Store. This is the reference locationhellip...

When a Cross-Section Beats an X-Ray

In building the Titanic Deck Chair a key design consideration involves the pivot joints that facilitate the folding of the chair for storage. There is a popular hardware assembly for pivot joints...

Making a Traditional Beveled-edge Drawer Bottom

In Chapter 9, pages 62-63 of my eBook, I describe the making of the beveled-edge drawer bottom for the Chamfered Post Table.   I've included a short video of the process of building this drawer...

Folding the Deck Chair

An important consideration for the design of the Titanic Deck Chair is its ability to fold into a flat assembly for storage. I've prepared a video below that shows how I checked the folding in...

The Back Rest on a Corner Chair

I built one of these corner chairs in 1982 - it would have been nice to have access to SketchUp at that time. Recently, I modeled the chair - it is based on a sketch by Wallace Nutting in his book...

Rearranging the Back Slats on the Deck Chair

Handling curved back slats on a chair, bench, Adirondack, or settee can be a challenge in SketchUp. Getting them properly positioned, spaced, and angled between the lower rail and the crest rail can...

Designing for Young Woodworkers

Our woodworking group will have a special challenge this summer - working a wood project with a group of 7-10 year olds. We will not have much time, less than one hour. What can you teach and build...

Set-up for Cornice Cove Cut on Table Saw

Occasionally, I'm faced with creating a cove cut on a Cornice Molding. Sometimes, I will use a table saw to cut out the cove shape and waste. Although there are formula for determining the fence...

Converting to an Arts & Crafts Dining Table

Inspired by a Sidney Barnsley piece, I designed and built an Arts & Crafts Fireplace (or Coffee) Table for a family with many young grandchildren. It provided space for sitting, eating, reading...

Making a Full-size Template in Layout

You can print full-size templates in SketchUp - we've already covered that process in this blog. But it can be more advantageous to create full-size templates using Layout, the companion program to...

A SketchUp Woodworking Exercise

Chapter Five of my eBook on SketchUp illustrates the steps in "building" a Workbench End. I used this example as an exercise in drawing precisely using guidelines and the keyboard for entry of length...

An Elliptical Window

I again attended the Colonial Williamsburg conference, Working Wood in the 18th Century. This year the theme was Furniture of George and Martha Washington, therefore presentations and demonstrations...

Open the Door

Sometimes it's good to show the inside of the cabinet. A viewer may want to know the number of shelves,  or what it looks like inside. So often I'm preparing a separate scene with a view inside...

Troubleshooting a Model

Almost everyday I receive a SketchUp model from somewhere in the world. It is usually an attachment to an email describing a problem performing an action described in one of the many steps outlined...

Tips on Dimensions

Making effective dimensioned drawings is an art. It's not so easy to figure out what dimensions are needed and how they should be displayed. I'm always impressed by drawings done by John Kassay in...

Chamfering the Exposed Tenon End

Some furniture styles (especially Arts & Crafts)  like to show through tenons - not only are they "through" but often protruding slightly. Then they are chamfered around the outer...

Recognizing a Reader

One week ago I received a surprising and satisfying email titled "I've Finished Your Book!!" I must admit that this was a first. I receive many emails regarding my book, but none have claimed...

A Door to Match My Kitchen Cabinets

A few weeks ago on this blog, I presented my Kitchen Cabinet for an engineer. I did not include the paneled door, so this entry will fill that void. I chose to use a Shaker style cabinet door with a...

Cleaning-up After an Intersection

After executing an Intersection command in SketchUp, there  are occasions when the results are not so good. You can have missing edges, holes, and lost faces. Often this is caused by SketchUps...

Making a Cope and Stick Joint in SketchUp

Making a cope and stick joint in the shop is easy with a matched set of router bits and a router table. But it can be more challenging in SketchUp. The vertical stile is easy enough with the...

Drawing Precisely

In Chapter 12 of my book, I show the modeling for a Shaker Step Stool. A reader sent me a note with an attached SketchUp file showing the step stool at Step 8, page 82. At this stage of the drawing...

Dovetails in a Shaker Blanket Chest

In Chapter Eight of my eBook I show a method of creating the dovetail joints in the carcase of a Shaker Blanket Chest. In my reproduction, this New Lebanon piece included 7 1/2 dovetails in the...

Kitchen Cabinets - The Engineer's Way

Have you searched for "Kitchen Cabinets" in Google Warehouse? I was amazed at the thousands of entries in all types and sizes. I recently spent several hours sifting through a number of the citations...

A Claw & Ball Foot in SketchUp

David Heim, the editor of my eBook on SketchUp, has recently sent me a method of making the claw and ball feet so typical of 18th Century furniture. His method was much easier that I had envisioned...

Design an iPad Support

There are many accessory products in the Apple Store for holding the iPad. I looked at many of them since I needed a platform for the iPad at the breakfast table - a platform that would position the...

The Power of Scenes

I commented in my last blog entry that Scenes seem to be the most obscure feature of SketchUp. For when I show my computer screen (and this happened at AWFS), I can count on immediate questions such...

SketchUp at AWFS

Last Saturday, I was a speaker at the AWFS (Association of Woodworkers and Furnishings Suppliers) conference in Las Vegas. It was a two-hour seminar titled "Google SketchUp for Woodworkers". About...

Woodworking at Veteran's Hospital

Our woodworking group is working with the local Veteran's Hospital to develop craft and SketchUp activities that may be helpful to veteran's at the hospital. The hospital staff are encouraging us to...

Quirks with the Push/Pull Tool

In Chapter 12 of my eBook, I show the "building" of a Windsor Chair. In Step 3, I say to use the Push/Pull Tool to give the shaped seat its thickness. Sounds easy enough, but you may have been...

Elongated Holes in SketchUp

In my book Chapter 9, Step 30, there are instructions for placing elongated holes in the Top Frame for fastening the Top. They're elongated to account for seasonal movement of the Top...

Showing Off Your SketchUp Inventory

It recently occurred to me that I could create display rooms of my furniture in SketchUp. I'm not sure how this could be productively used, but it is interesting to see what you can achieve. I was...

Tough Going with Follow Me

The Follow Me Tool has been one of the most reliable and effective tools in my design of furniture in SketchUp. After all, I like furniture with turnings and moldings so Follow Me has been...

Have You Run Into the Clipping Plane?

In this case, I'm not referring to a particular shop hand plane, rather a phenomenon in SketchUp. You can run into a Clipping Plane when zooming in very closely to your model.  All of a sudden...

Do you Click-Move-Click, or Click-Drag-Release?

A reader of my book recently asked why his mouse was not working like my book explanations. While drawing a line with the Line Tool, he could not get the mouse to "click-move-click", rather he was...

Evolving a Design in SketchUp

When beginning a new design, I plan on saving several SketchUp versions as the project develops. I will start with a "1" after the filename, and continue with "2, 3, 4, 5…. etc." when changing...

Showing Shop Dovetail Procedure (in SketchUp)

Recently I tried to explain my dovetail procedure used in the shop. The project was making several Shaker Chip Boxes, and each corner is fastened with hand-cut dovetails thesenbspare...

Modeling a Windsor Chair - Part 1

For next semester's class at Mount Diablo Adult Education Center, I'm developing a model and accompanying design documents for a Braced Comb-Back Side Chair. I like to replicate actual 18th C...

Checking a Plane Angle - in SketchUp?

Sometimes it's easier to determine a difficult angle by drawing a model of the problem in SketchUp and measuring the angle. Recently in one of my classes, while hand planing the surface of a drawer...

An Index - eBook References to DCB Blogs

Several blog entries here in Design. Click. Build.  provide more information on sections and procedures in my eBook, "Google SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers". Below I've idexed these references...

Connecting a Dowel Joint

Some SketchUp users may wonder how you align and connect a dowel joint. After all, there are no corners  to grab on the dowel to match-up with the socket. To get around this limitation, you need...

Documenting a Shop Procedure (and also a Training Tool)

I sometimes regret not capturing and documenting successful shop construction procedures, particularly those complex ones not used frequently. I easily forget how I worked it out before, and end up...

Trouble Seeing the Tenon

Several readers of my book are having difficulty making the mortise on the Chamfered Post Table. The reference is "Create the Leg Mortises", Step 19 on page 50. In this section of the book, I showed...

Bending an Inlay Strip

I'm constructing the small sideboard as shown below. The lower front decorated rail has a strip inlay on the bottom curved edge. Not only was I unsure how to bend this strip in the shop, I was...

Williamsburg's Queen Anne Leg

As mentioned in my last blog entry, I attended this year's Williamsburg conference "Working Wood in the 18th Century". The theme of the conference was Asian and Oriental influence on 18th Century...

3-way Miter Joint, Chinese Style

I had to do it….. after attending the Williamsburg  conference "Working Wood in the 18th Century", I rushed to the computer to figure out that beautiful, interesting, complex, and strong...

Where's My Component?

Here's another quirk in SketchUp….. sometimes you can select a group of graphics on the screen, execute making it a "component", yet the group of graphics you started with does not become a...

Flutes on the Pilasters

I'm developing a model of a famous American Corner Cupboard. I built this piece years ago but did not have the advantage of a SketchUp model. Here's the current status of the model (finished except...

Dower Chest with Solid Tools

I'm working on a reproduction of a Pennsylvania Dower Chest and have enjoyed experimenting with the new Solid Tools that are a part of Pro version 8.  The same results can be achieved with the...

Back Edges

The new version 8 of SketchUp released several months ago introduced a new Face Style called Back Edges. Below this face style is shown in the Styles Toolbar. I'm liking this new feature and have...

The Most Often Frustrating Error

As I review the comments, questions, and issues by readers of my book, I'm seeing a common and frequent error being made in using SketchUp. Here it is - perhaps too early to declare the "most often...

Cutting the Ogee-shaped Cutout in the Magazine Rack

In Chapter 7 of my book, I present the first practice piece of furniture - the making of a Magazine Rack. Although it looks simple, this project has some challenges. Last week I posted a video on...

Making/Copying Chamfers in Table Leg

In Chapter 9 of my eBook, on page 47, I describe a method of making and copying the chamfers on the Chamfer Post Table. After receiving questions on this procedure, I've created a video showing the...

The Curule Construction - and Ancient X-frame Chair Design

While developing the Jefferson Campeche Chair (first in SketchUp, then in the shop), I ran across an interesting 20-page document titled, "The Campeche Chair in The Metropolitan Museum of Art". This...

Chamfered Post Table and Mortise & Tenon Joints

To help answer comments on the creation of mortise and tenon joints for the Chamfer Post Table in Chapter Nine of my book, I've created  the  video below. This shows my recommended...

Tongue & Groove Joints in Magazine Rack

Following last week's publication of "SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers", I've received several questions on the making of the tongue & groove joints on the Magazine Rack. The specific reference in...

Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

Yesterday Fine Woodworking launched my new book, "SketchUp Guide for Woodworkers". See the link into the Taunton Store here. An e-book in PDF format, the first four chapters get you started with...

Maloof and Templates by SketchUp

I believe it is a record for me - that is, the number of templates used in one piece of furniture. Without them I would be lost...

Seat Frame for a Maloof Occasional Chair

Some of my students and I are reproducing a Maloof Occasional Chair that has a tufted leather seat. I don't have information on Sam's design,  and particularly whether he used a solid or a...

Updated with Video: Making a Shaker Knob

A reader had difficulty creating a Shaker drawer knob. In particular, she found it difficult to place the path for the Follow Me. Also she could not get Follow Me to work with the turning profile...

New SketchUp Version 8

I imagine many of you are aware of the new SketchUp version 8, and have already downloaded the new version. I think it is a good idea to upgrade as there are always beneficial improvements and...

Placing a Leather Sling on the Campeche Chair

I'm progressing with the construction of the Campeche Chair. All of the components are dry-fitted, so glue-up, shaping, finishing, and finally leather fastening are yet to do. I found a large piece...

The Campeche Chair Upholstery Rail

It was early in 2010 that I first reported on the Campeche Chair shown in the Williamsburg conference "Working Wood in the 18th Century". I modeled-up the chair but never completed the design...

Installation Instructions in SketchUp/Layout

My last entry covered a group project to create bunk beds for a local city camp in the Sierra near Lake Tahoe. We accomplished the goal within our original schedule of four days, delivering two bunks...

The Bed Bolt Joint

To me the bed bolt joint is very important - I'm using it quite often in large furniture pieces including non-bed furniture such as work benches and display cabinets. Not only is it effective for...

A Summertime Group Project

Often in summer, our local woodworking club (Diablo Woodworkers) takes on a volunteer project in the shop. This year it looks like we will be building bunk beds for the city's family camp located in...

Materials, Colors, and Textures 5

As indicated in the previous blog entries on this subject, I am usually able to paste the textures without fiddling with (or editing) the component. I find it simpler to set up the texture so it...

Materials, Colors, and Textures 4

Here is another example of texturing using an 18th Century mahogany bookcase, as shown below. This example has both vertical and horizontal grain components, so requires a different procedure from...

Materials, Colors, and Textures 3

This is the third entry of a series on Materials, Colors and Textures. The first two blog entries covered the easy application of colors. This entry moves on to the application of wood grain finish...

Materials, Colors, and Textures 2

In this second coloring example, I will shown how to color edges or lines different than the standard black. Often, I like to show the sight lines on a Windsor chair seat in a contrasting colorStep...

Materials, Colors, and Textures 1

I admit showing limited application of model coloring or texturing, rather emphasizing default values for edges and faces. This has been intentional as I don't usually find value in...

Sculpturing a Windsor Seat with Plug-in

For years I've struggled with shaping (in SketchUp) the seat on a Windsor, or for that matter a Maloof, chair. I continue to look for easier ways than my brute force method using shaped "cutters" along with...

Overcoming a Quirk in SketchUp

In using the term "quirk" I'm not referring to an architectural term - a division of a molding. Rather I'm referring to a "peculiarity of action". A reader asked me why SketchUp was...

A Maloof Chair Animation

I must confess not having made a SketchUp animation. So using the Maloof lowback chair, I created a series of scenes in my SketchUp file. The scenes were in a sequence of construction steps in the...

Easy Errors to Make

One of the most important byproducts of using SketchUp is the high quality of drawing integrity - something you can count on when in the shop. However, there are still many things that can go...

The Scale Tool

The Scale Tool is quite powerful and useful in specific woodworking tasks. It is shown below in the middle of the large vertical toolset. It looks like a small baseball diamond with an arrow...

Making a Bevel-edged Panel

Last week I showed my method of modeling the frame for a small cupboard paneled door. The frame consisted of the stiles and rails fastened with through mortise and tenon joints. It is a classic...

Building a Paneled Door

Here is a small colonial cupboard that was presented in a Fine Woodworking article in issue #151. Although appearing simple, this little piece has some complex but classic features. One of those is the paneled door having a 1/4-in. thumbnail around the inner perimeter of the stiles and rails.

Tips on Zooming

In teaching SketchUp, I often find students trying to edit and work on a model that is zoomed-out to a fly speck. As you probably know, this can make SketchUp a very frustrating exercise. Making and...

Are You Taking Advantage of the Arrow Keys?

Here is an important helpful aid in modeling in 3D. Since it can be challenging to stay on axis, SketchUp has some handy ways to help us. There are four Arrow Keys on the computer keyboard -up, down...

Why Can't I Get a Face?

I suspect it's already happened to you - you've drawn a nice shape and the face will not close. Don't worry, this will continue to happen, especially as you build more complex shapes. I'm in my fifth...

The Importance of the Mouse and Scroll Wheel

Occasionally I hear of SketchUp users making use of a trackpad, touchpad, or mouse without a scroll wheel and left/right buttons. I don't know if there are many users adopting these hardware options...

Printing to Scale

A reader asked me to show how to print a scaled drawing of components in SketchUp on a paper size of 8 1/2 x 11. Except for full-size templates, I must admit not printing scaled drawings. For shop...

Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

Often furniture with turned legs and stretchers have pummels or square sections of the turning. Both Dave and I have previously shown methods for handling this complexity. A reader recently asked to...

Guide Lines, Guide Points, and Linear Guides

SketchUp has a rich set of construction lines (temporary layout dotted lines) called Guides. I find these features extremely powerful in furniture design. Guides are created by the Tape Measure Tool...

Monticello's Universal Table

In the recent Williamsburg Conference - Working Wood in the 18th Century - Mack Headley gave an interesting talk on various furniture examples from Monticello. One of the pieces he described and...

Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

This past week I attended the "Working Wood in the 18th Century" conference in Williamsburg, VA, as I have done for the past five years. Each year the conference has a special theme, and this year it...

Would You Like a Front, Side, and Top View?

It seems a paradox, while producing a complete detailed 3D model, there still is a benefit to having the old standby top, end, and front orthographic view. In the beginning with SketchUp, I abandoned...

"Components" in SketchUp

A reader recently sent a note saying:  I started learning Sketchup today for a bookcase I am going to   build.  I created the box of the bookcase, used the push/pull toolnbsp...

Replicating a Maloof Design from Pictures

Often I'm faced with replicating an existing piece of furniture, but without detailed information or access to the original piece. In fact, the only information available, may be a couple pictures...

Shaping a High Arched Foot

Last week I showed the procedure I used to make the breadboard on a Shaker Table. Using that same table, I will demonstrate a method for making and shaping the high-arched foot. The making of the...

Building a Table Top Breadboard

There are many designs for breadboards. In this case I've chosen one that uses a continuous tongue length and wood screws. Of course, the breadboard connection must accommodate top...

Personalizing Your SketchUp Settings

I have been requested to update my blog entry Personalizing Your SketchUp Settings, dated November 2007, and still accessible in the archive. Since that date, there have been new versions of...

How to Use SketchUp to Get the Most from a Digital Woodworking Plan

Have you purchased a Digital Plan from FineWoodworking.com? Here's how can you take advantage of the digital file to zoom in, print, x-ray, and review every detail and measurement in SketchUp

Replicating Drawers in a Highboy

I'm continually building drawers and never are two the same. In starting a new piece of furniture I will "rob" one of my drawer designs in a previous piece. But then they need to be adapted to the...

Dimensioning Multiple Views of a Component

Dave Richards and I have covered multiple ways of handling dimensioning in several previous blog entries. One difference is my low frequency use of layers while dimensioning, and Dave's more liberal...

Making the Bonnet for a Highboy

How do you go about creating the bonnet on a highboy which includes that curved molding? The following are steps I used recently. Nothing too unusual for SketchUp, however it requires a few Follow Me...

Adding the Stretching Rails to the Breakfast Table

There is a nicely shaped stretching rail connecting the lower part of the legs in the Thomas Elfe breakfast table. One complication in making this stretching assembly is the fact that the table is...

Making the Wooden Hinged Table Leaf Support

So far in this series on the Breakfast Table, we've done the rule joint, legs, and pierced carved skirt. In this post, I will show how to make the wooden hinge for the leaf support. The final wooden...

Create a Carved, Pierced Table Apron

Continuing my series on the Thomas Elfe Breakfast Table, this post covers the creation of the fancy carved and pierced apron. I don't even try to model actual carved surfaces, rather "brand" the...

Creating the Legs for the Breakfast Table

As mentioned before, I will do a series on the Thomas Elfe Breakfast Table including the legs, pierced skirts, stretching rails, and wooden hinged leaf supports. I'll be doing this series in a...

Challenging Features in Thomas Elfe Breakfast Table

In my last entry I showed the making of a rule joint using one of Thomas Elfe's famous breakfast tables. The table has so many more interesting features that I decided to run a series of entries on...

A Rule Joint on a Thomas Elfe Table

I started out thinking a tutorial on making a rule joint would be quite straightforward. My mistake was underestimating what it would take to do on a fancy Thomas Elfe Breakfast Table. I'm interested...

A Listing of Windsor Chair Entries

A reader remembered reading specific blog posts on Windsor Chairs, but was unable to locate them in Design. Click. Build. I can understand the difficulty of retrieving and locating specific...

Creating a Hinge in SketchUp

A reader asked how to make a hinge in SketchUp, specifically a Brusso Stop Hinge (used for small boxes). I've created many different types of hinges for my furniture designs, but typically I rough...

Making a Windsor Settee Arm/Crest Rail

I'm continuing my repertoire of Windsor chairs by adding a two-seat, low-back Settee. This one from Connecticut, circa 1820. As usual I start with the design in SketchUp and found a unique situation...

Some Turnings are Just More Difficult

I was working with an 18th Century Mahogany Bookcase that includes this complex cornice. There are a number of components in this cornice assembly including the small turned pendants. The pendants...

What are the Special Strengths of SketchUp?

The other day I was looking for a list of the best things about SketchUp - things that are unique and special and make it an effective tool for woodworking. I couldn't find one so decided to create...

Flexibility with Cross Sections

I don't use a lot of cross-sections in my design documents, but occasionally I find them extremely effective. They are particularly useful where it is difficult, with normal visualizations, to see...

My Strategy with SketchUp

There are a number of ways SketchUp is used in woodworking including:1. The development of a conceptual design2. Creating views and images for client review3. Working out a complex joint4. Estimating...

Making a Recorder Instrument

After hearing news recently of the discovery of world's oldest musical instrument - a 35,000 year old flute made from a wing bone - I wondered how it would be to create a "modern" recorder. Using...

Roy Underhill's Scribed Window Sash

Roy Underhill was a recent guest speaker at Mt. Diablo Woodworker's in Pleasant Hill, CA. It was a fantastic and entertaining day of demonstrations and discussion. One of Roy's subjects during the...

Difficult Dimension Placement

Occasionally I'm faced with components which are hard to dimension; for example, when the component has a fully shaped edge and I can't easily find the endpoints to place a dimension. The Dimension...

Dilemma with Maloof Rocker Arm

I was not satisfied with my first attempt at the Maloof Rocker Arm as shown in last week's blog entry. So I re-read the FWW # 42 article, "How to Make a Rocker". Each time I read Maloof's text, I...

Maloof Rocker - Roughing into SketchUp

Readers who know me will recognize my shift into contemporary with this blog entry. I admit being stuck in the 18th C with my furniture interests, but this excursion was too tempting. Some of my...

Seven Beginning Steps in SketchUp

  I've been teaching SketchUp to woodworkers for about two years. Most of my teaching has occurred at the adult education center in Pleasant Hill, CA. However, there have been several sessions...

Bending a Continuous Bow

While struggling to steam bend fresh ash lumber in the shop, I'm also striving for better and easier methods of bending on the computer in SketchUp. For "real" bends, I'm learning to appreciate key...

Create Shop Drawings II

This is the second entry in a series covering the creation of shop drawings. Last week I showed the use of Scenes to provide a way of capturing views of the model required for construction in the...

Create Shop Drawings

Now that you've got your piece of furniture modeled in SketchUp, how do you extract/ show information and drawings needed in the shop? For this you need to know about SketchUp "Scenes" which allow...

Using the Intersect Feature

In SketchUp you can interact different model shapes and find their "intersections". The feature is called "Intersect" and comes in handy for furniture design. A popular example of its use, is the...

Breadboard Joinery for the Table Top

I'll show my SketchUp procedure for making detail connections of a breadboard to a table top. This design, while using tenon pegs,  allows for seasonal movement of wood which is a main...

Making a Bevel-edged Drawer Bottom

Both Dave Richards and I have recommended modeling components in the context of the assembled piece of furniture. This saves time and reduces errors by drawing a new component where it fits among...

More on Mirroring with Flip Along

Last week I showed how to mirror table legs using the Flip Along feature of SketchUp. As pointed out in comments to the post, there are conditions which will affect the results of Flip Along. In my...

Mirroring with Flip Along

For new students of SketchUp, the Flip Along command is one of the most confusing. Yet, it is a feature that is difficult to avoid in woodworking , as we continually "flip" or mirror components in...

The Most Basic Procedure in SketchUp

Readers have recently mentioned difficulty in drawing a line to exact length and achieving a clean rectangle with a face. This is the most basic operation in SketchUp and without success here...

Lessons in Teaching SketchUp to Woodworkers

Over the past couple years in this blog, I've reported on my experiences teaching SketchUp to woodworking students. This entry follows in that tradition. This week I finished another 3session...

Joint Push/Pull

I'm working on another Windsor - this time a fan back arm chair. This style,  as shown below in a rough model, includes a curved crest rail which captures the top of the spindles and turned...

The Effectiveness of Imported Scanned Images

This week my scanner malfunctioned and I was faced with creating a turning without the benefit of the scanned-imported image.  I was on a tight schedule, so there was pressure to get the turning...

Style Settings for Woodworking

I'm often asked to have a look at SketchUp files for suggestions on getting around a problem. Most often the files have default settings based on the template Product Design and Woodworking. (To see...

Rules for Dimensions

Dimensioning in SketchUp can be tricky, so I find it important to stick to some basic rules as follows:1. Don't place dimensions within a component with one exception - dimensions for circles, arcs...

Federal or Hepplewhite Legs with Inlay

As mentioned in my last post, I attended the recent Williamsburg Conference on "Working Wood in the 18th Century". One of the show pieces was a Federal Dressing Table presented by Steve Latta. He...

"Align View" - a Little Known, but Handy Function

I don't use it that often, but when I do the "Align View" function is very helpful. It comes in handy when I'm making a full-size template of a component's details. In the case of the 18th C Childs...

An 18th C Child's Cradle - Handling Difficult Shapes and Angles

Last week I attended the Colonial Williamsburg Conference, "Working Wood in the 18th Century. Covering the subject - Bedroom Furniture -  I found this conference very educational and valuable...

Key Subjects Indexed to Archived Posts

I've not done an analysis of questions received over the last couple years. However, it seems that some of the most frequent questions involve subjects or issues listed below.  These issues have...

Making a Window Sash or Breakfront Cabinet Door

Classic window sash and breakfront glass doors with molded muntins are challenging woodworking projects. However,  I find that working through the detail design in SketchUp clears up any...

Making a Bail for a Shaker Chip Box

In starting the design for a Shaker Chip Box, I thought how easy it looked -  but soon was surprised by the complexity of the bent handle or Bail. This component is not so simple with its right...

Adjusting or Tweaking Your Model - A Loft Bed Example

 Often I find myself fairly complete with a model design, yet have second thoughts about the overall size or configuration. Or following a presentation to a customer, adjustments and...

Continuing on Ladder Back - The Centerline Framework

About two weeks ago, I showed the beginning steps involved in making the SketchUp model of a Ladder Back Chair - mainly the creation of the Back Posts. In this post, I will continue the modeling...

An Important Setup Step for Woodworkers

I'm teaching another woodworking group this week, and am reminded how important initial setup steps simplify SketchUp and reduce frustration. I described many of these steps in a February 2008 blog...

Organizing, Bundling, and Printing Full-size Templates

I've emphasized often, the benefits in the shop of having full-size templates as an output from the SketchUp model. Until now, I've created these templates one-by-one, printing as jpgs or pdfs on a...

Making a Tapered Bend

Following my last post, I felt somewhat uncomfortable about taking a short-cut with the Back Post. Rather than executing a bowed bend for the upper section of the Back Post, I simply rotated the...

Starting a Ladder Back Chair

Here is the method I use to start the SketchUp modeling of an 18th C Ladder Back Armchair.

More on Ladder Back Chair Back Slats

Recently I have been modeling an 18th C. Ladder Back Arm Chair (Connecticut, Circa 1740). Here is a picture of the modeling status so far. Again I faced the creation of Back Slats - four...



Recent comments


Re: A Classic Bench from a Picture

John, thanks for the feedback. I always prefer pictures that simulate top, side, and front orthographic views. Then there is no need for using Photo Match. But like you, those kinds of pictures are not often available.

Tim

Re: Williamsburg - Egg & Dart Carving

David, good ideas and nicely done.

I would like to see the cut out area come in vertical where it meets the top 3/8 deep flat.

Williamsburg cabinetmakers also commented that my egg was not rounded. And you have solved that issue.

I would also like to depress some of the tongue decoration as is done in the carving. I suppose this would require a plug in to push pull a curved surface.

Tim

Re: How Far with SketchUp - Sculpturing?

Joe, after picking the Arc Tool, type your number of sides right away and hit Enter. This is the same procedure you use when picking the Circle Tool to change from the default number of sides.

Tim

Re: How Far with SketchUp - Sculpturing?

Joe, it sounds like what you are trying to achieve is doable without too much effort.
If you send the file, I'll have a look and let you know whether there is an expedient result.

Tim

Re: Re-creating a Missing Component

PalmBay.....
The script that provides the Circle Center Point for 2013 version need to be downloaded by the user from the Extension Warehouse. Select the Warehouse from the Window menu. Then scroll down to Categories, click on Drawing. You can change the sorting of the list by changing to alphabetical. You want to find Examples Ruby Script in the list. After you log in, you should be able to download it and activate it like any other RBZ file.
After downloading this plug-in, you should see Point at Center in the pop-up list when right clicking on the circle.

Tim

Re: How Far with SketchUp - Sculpturing?

To mrossk: Thanks for the comment and certainly an important note.
In the case you cite, I'm guessing there was a "non-intersecting" round-over of the Arm component edge -not so much "sculpturing" as I'm defining it. If so, I would include in the SketchUp model since this effort would be small and ensure that enough material is accommodated.

Tim

Re: Growth of the Shop Drawing Package

NickJW... An old laptop makes sense. While I have WiFi extending to the shop, having a laptop in my crowded dusty shop would be a problem. Not only that, it would be hard to find an empty table space for its safe location. I'm stuck with having to walk up stairs to the desktop or to the family room laptop. I've got an old iPad that would be more useful to me for displaying the documents, so this may be the best I can do.

Tim

Re: Growth of the Shop Drawing Package

Swingman: thank you for your thoughtful comments and ideas for handling the amount of information in the shop.

Tim

Re: Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair in SketchUp - Part 7

To megabang, as usual there are several ways to create full-size templates. For my own use in the shop, I set up the template scene in SketchUp with Parallel Projection and the Camera set to a standard Front View. (The bow template in the case, is really the bending form as I showed in the video.)
Then I reduce the "white space" on the screen using the Windows Minimize icon in the top right corner of the screen. I click on File in the Menu bar and pick Print Preview. I can review how many pages will print and whether I can remove more white space by using Portrait or Landscape format, or adjusting the Window size.
I have no problem attaching multiple pages and paste them to thick posterboard.
For my students, I use Layout and arrange the full size templates on large scale paper. Then I output PDF format for them to send to a print shop like Kinkos.
Either way, the ease of achieving full size templates in SketchUp is a remarkable advantage in the shop work.

Tim

Re: Making a Windsor Bowback Side Chair - Part 3

David Heim: Thank you for the note.
"Leveling" the chair is the last thing I do after glue-up and before finishing. I set the chair on a very flat and level floor or on the table saw. I usually want the front top of seat at 18-in. and the back of the seat at 17 3/4-in. I use a level and shims to adjust the legs for this arrangement. Then I make a marking block to scribe around the legs to show the cut-off location.
For this procedure to work properly, I make sure that the legs are long enough in the SketchUp design. In the case of this chair, I found the 18 1/2-in. length for the front leg as shown in the Fine Woodworking article to be too short. So I've used 19 3/8-in. length for all four legs.

Tim

Re: Breadboard Joinery for the Table Top

WouldWorker: I should have said that the end tenons are 1 7/8-in. wide, giving 1/16-in. margin on each side of the corresponding mortises.

Tim

Re: Breadboard Joinery for the Table Top

WouldWorker, yes you are right that the end mortises in the breadboard are wider than the tenons in top. In the case of this table, the end mortises are 2-in. wide and the tenons are 1/16-in. I was using sugar pine that is a very stable wood in seasonal swings. There is a slot in the tenon so that the pin can allow the movement.
I made these tables about 5 years ago. I can see and feel the change in dimension on the ends of the breadboard depending on what time of year it is. I can tell that the differential movement is taking place, and is working properly to avoid splitting the top.

Tim

Re: A Listing of Windsor Chair Entries

To cdub: I just finished the last of the series on making the Knife Box. So I'm planning to post the first step on the Windsor in about two weeks.

Tim

Re: A Listing of Windsor Chair Entries

Clinton, I like your idea on going through a complete chair build in SketchUp. This would probably take 7 or 8 entries starting from the very beginning steps. This time I would incorporate video.

I'll start with a Windsor Bowback using an old article in FWW as a reference.

Thanks for the feedback.

Tim

Re: A Listing of Windsor Chair Entries

Clinton, I do have files for these old entries. They may be somewhat dated so I would be reluctant to simply re-post as my skills have improved and the tools have changed. However I would be willing to review and repost.

Perhaps you could tell me which of these posts are most important, or provide a prioritization of the subjects.

Tim

Re: Knife Box - Williamsburg, Part 2

David5346: Good catch and comment. One reason I use Groups at first before changing to Components, is the process of tracing over faces in the imported image. If I make these shapes components on the tracing, later changes to the components ruin my initial shapes. I like to retain my initial shapes since they are valuable assets to use again.

When I'm doing a design for the first time, I find that I'm experimenting with alternate ways of creating components, some of which will be discarded, I find that using groups in this early stage of figuring out the component, makes it easier to have multiple trial runs, saving each one, and allowing my returning to any of these alternates.

Nonetheless, when I am done experimenting, and before using multiple instances, I switch to components.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

Robert42: Thank you Dave for responding to Robert's issues.
I quickly looked at Chapter 15 page 128 under The Exploded View to check my instructions. Sure enough, the second paragraph states "Select the fully assembled model and use the Move/Copy Tool to make a copy and move it off to the side."
Nevertheless, these details are quite difficult to capture when tackling a sophisticated technology.

Tim

Re: Lady's Travelling Box - Williamsburg Conference

Polymantilas: I think you should check your division. I don't get the same results as you, but replicate the values determined by SketchUp.

12.75/9=1.412
15.75/1.412=11.15

These are the values that are very close to those calculated in Williamsburg. They ended up at 15.875 width and 11.18 length.

Tim

Re: Lady's Travelling Box - Williamsburg Conference

To Polimantilas: you are correct and the ratio method is valid and works. There are numerous errors in using any of these methods in scanning, copying, straightening, measuring, and drawing coincident lines. It is probably A good idea to work it out multiple ways and compare with other pieces.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To SLoughin: Steve, I would like to know if you have been helped with the .skp file. Taunton Customer Service was to have helped with this. If not, let me know by email, and I will get you the file.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

SteveL, I am traveling and contacted Taunton Press Customer Support regarding your problem with the download at Apple. I'm hoping they've resolved your problem.

Tim

Re: Chamfered Post Table Mortise & Tenon Joints

JeffB.... Nice to hear from you again.
Tim

Re: Designing in SketchUp - a Planing Sled

Lanier, thank you for the good suggestions.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To Slick6: Sorry you are having difficulty. I've not heard of any issues with using this file on the iPad. I have the PDF files installed on my iPads with no problems. I'm using the app, GoodReader for all of my PDFs.

Since your file on the PC is good, seems there may be an issue with the transfer of the file from your PC to the iPAD app.

In any case, you may want to contact Taunton Press Customer Support Center at 800 477 8727.

Tim

Re: Designing in SketchUp - a Planing Sled

To: jwarshafsky: Thank you for your comments. Your planing method is certainly the best. I remember Ian Kirby teaching to plane against a stop only, and to not rely on pinching the board between dogs, as that causes problems.

Perhaps I should just remove the dog holes and rely on the front stop only. However, I know how often I use the dogs on my European bench to hold things.

I plan on teaching students to plane without the dogs, It is faster than messing with the wedges. But I also planned for use of the dogs, where necessary.

Tim

Re: Starting a Modern Danish Style Desk

To Lignin: I know what you mean by overdoing the digital work. My philosophy with SketchUp is to do what is necessary for my building in the shop. For me this still means a lot of detail content in the model. I don't like to figure things, dimensions, shapes, etc. while in the shop. I find that the work in the shop is much more efficient with a complete SketchUp model with all components. Also all joinery and shapes must be established in the model.
I don't need materials, grain, and colors to show off how realistic I can make the model look. Most of my customers and students can live with my level of detail. However, I do go beyond my shop requirements when making Layout documentation for my students or for sale.

Tim

Re: Building a Philadelphia Lowboy

To Rooms: The way I do "branding" is by using "Intersection" on the face of the components using a carving profile. I've had additional comments through email on this procedure.

So my next video and blog entry will show this process on one of the components of the Lowboy.

Tim

Re: Building a Philadelphia Lowboy

Thank you Sandy, In my working life, I watched how traditional CAD tools changed and improved the design process for complex process plants, power plants, and other facilities. It was especially exciting to watch the transition to 3D and how this improved design and the communication to on site construction work of these complex process facilities.

At the same time, I was using 2D CAD systems in my furniture hobby but wanted the same 3D advantages in my own furniture making. I tried 3D in traditional CAD systems but could not get there.

SketchUp was a breakthrough for me. I finally could achieve full 3D capability in furniture design. It required about a month of full-time attention. That was about 6 years ago, and I'm very glad to have made that investment.

SketchUp and 3D has enabled me to tackle more complex woodworking tasks, including Windsor chairs. When you can model in 3D, the mystery is exposed, opening new possibilities.

On your second question, I am not a carver. I struggle with this and have not had formal training of any kind. I have watched the master cabinetmakers at Williamsburg, and this has been an important source of education. Also, I have several classic books that serve as good references.

Tim

Re: Cutting the Ogee-shaped Cutout in the Magazine Rack

bfblack: I'm perplexed by your seeing a "blue diamond" above the Push/Pull Tool cursor. I have not seen one of those.

If you simply draw a rectangle off in space, then pick the Push/Pull Tool and hover over the face, do you see this strange blue diamond?

When hovering, the face ordinarily changes to a highlighted dotted texture. Or if it is a component, and you hover without opening the component for editing, you will see a standard "No" icon above the cursor. That is, one of those red circles with a slash.

Perhaps the graphics card in your computer is doing something strange. To check this, you can turn off "hardware acceleration" in the Preferences Settings.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To refin: this is a fine place to ask questions.
Simply copy your drawer pull while in that file (you can select the component, then copy with Ctrl C). Then go to your drawer file and paste the pull there.

Tim

Re: Outfitting a Desk Drawer

RalphBarker: thanks, I tried hard to replicate Modesto Ash. The trough is old growth redwood, and the drawer bottom is sugar pine.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To Ridley, your difficulty in printing on a single page, may be fixed by a simple checkmark on the Fit to Page option.

After clicking on Print or Print Preview under the File tab in the Menu Bar, a print dialog box appears. In the middle of the page, make sure that Fit to Page is checked. Also make sure that Use Model Extents is unchecked.

With this setting, whatever view of the model that is displayed on the screen will print on the single page.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To Silvij: The videos are accessed on various pages of the PDF download. The first video is on Page 14, titled "Cabinets in CloseUp". You should be seeing a line-up of 7 cabinets in the video window. When you move your mouse over the the window, a "text flag" appears saying "Click to Activate". Simply click the mouse and the video will start.

If this does not work for you, then I suggest you contact Customer Service at FineWoodworking.com. You can click on the Customer Service link at the bottom of their web page.

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To refin: the position of the cabinet, or any of its components, to SketchUp's displayed red, green, and blue axes at the origin, is not relevant to modeling, moving, or connecting components. The modeling can be done at any location in the modeling space. Making, positioning and moving components is done with specific axes in mind, but not with regard to those permanent displayed axes at the origin.

Tim

Re: Creating and Editing Tenon Peg Holes

If you have any trouble getting the Point at Center option to show up in the menu, do the following:

Cliick on Window in the Menu Bar and choose Preferences. On the Mac, click on SketchUp and Prefer-ences. In the System Preferences dialog box, click on Extensions. Make sure that Ruby Script Examples is checked. Then try to place the guide point again.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To refin: you don't need to be advanced at all. But it would help a lot if you went through the first several chapters of my first book. There you get information on setup, how to move around the model, and how best to use the SketchUp tools for woodworking.

Tim

Re: An Index - eBook References to DCB Blogs

Denniswoodworker: sounds like you have saved a file as a template and failed to do a Purge. Even though you deleted the graphics the component definitions are still held in the file unless purged.

I just did a blog entry last week on Managing your Template. Refer to that for more information. You want to have a clean template to start your files or you will get those messages that say you already have those component names.

To do a purge, go to Window/Model Info and click on Statistics in the left hand panel. Then click on the Purge Unused button.

Tim

Re: An Elliptical Window

To JohnOSeattle: I did make GW's desk he used in NY when first President. This desk design is popular and found in one of Margon's books.

However, this piece was not in Mt. Vernon.

Thanks for your comments......

Tim

Re: An Elliptical Window

To JohnOSeattle: There were books sold by Mt. Vernon that were in the sales shop in Williamsburg during the event. I do not remember seeing any books that were specific to furniture nor ones that included design information.

There was reference to a drawing by Carlyle Lynch, Jr. of a Mt. Vernon Pembroke Table (ref. The Bruce Publishing Co. 1954).

Also there was reference to Albert Sack's "The New Fine Points of Furniture: Early American that included a Sheraton mahogany racquet-back armchair. George Washington apparently had a set of these.

You could check with Mt. Vernon. Also, a Google search could discover something of interest.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

RockMaple: Below is the Table of Contents and other contents.

Thanks for the comment,

Tim

Introduction
Before We Begin…..................... 1

Chapter One
Brushing Up on SketchUp.............. 3

Chapter Two
Cabinet Types and Structures......... 9

Chapter Three
A Wall-Mounted Cabinet...............21

Chapter Four
A Display Case in the Arts and Crafts Style..66

Chapter Five
American Colonial Corner Cupboard...........101

Chapter Six
How to Adjust and Resize Components and Models..148

Chapter Seven
How to Assemble a Package of Shop Drawings......175

Index...........................................187


Also included:
Thirteen videos, and
Three .skp files
A Wall-Mounted Cabinet
A Display Case
American Colonial Corner Cupboard

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

To MorrieLewis: the videos are embedded in the PDF file at strategic locations. Don't look for separate video files. Look for full-page indications of a video and click on the page. I've shown one of those video pages above in Chapter 4 Creating the Cabinet Drawers.

Tim

Re: Announcement: My New eBook - SketchUp and Traditional Cabinets

Martino23: I'm sorry you had trouble with the printing shop. I've not heard of that issue before. I agree that you need a hard copy or have it installed on an iPad or equivalent. Many readers are printing on their local printer, then taking the hard copy to a print service for binding only. The cost of the binding is usually less than $ 5.

I know Fine Woodworking gives considerable thought to the alternatives of publishing in eBook or hardcopy. Obviously there are many pros and cons. I'm sure they will use your input in consideration of future work.

Thank you for the feedback.....

Tim

Re: An Index - eBook References to DCB Blogs

Dennis, I believe the correct reference for the bevel edge drawer bottom is:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/11864/making-a-bevel-edged-drawer-bottom

This is not a video, and I don't think I have posted a video on this procedure.

Often there is trouble with the Follow Me Tool in forgetting to right click on the face of the profile and selecting Edit Component. So the steps are: 1) Select the path, 2) Pick the Follow Me Tool, 3) Right click on profile and select Edit Component, 4) Click mouse on the profile.

Let me know if you are still having trouble with this.

Tim

Re: Folding the Deck Chair

To 22...... I only know of one design that is available through a Google search. Unfortunately, I don't think this is an accurate reproduction. I have been working with several pictures to attempt a closer representation. I have also communicated with the Halifax museum, however without direct access to an actual chair, reproduction is full of error.
I am now building a prototype based on my model that I'm hoping is an acceptable match.

Tim

Re: Set-up for Cornice Cove Cut on Table Saw

DennettFarm: yes, you're right that the blade and table top must be "grouped". I should have made that clearer in my presentation.

Thanks for the feedback.

Tim

Re: A SketchUp Woodworking Exercise

Dan, thanks for the note, and glad that you are using the system to help with problems. Dave and I encourage readers to ask for assistance in resolving issues. Sometimes things don't work out right and it is hard to find the answer.

On your specific problem, you didn't mention that you indeed saved and named the template - under the File Tab and menu item "Save as Template". Not sure you took this action. Also, SketchUp not only asks that you Name the template, but you also need to add some description in the space provided in the dialog box.

You can check what template is currently being used (the default) by clicking on Window/Preferences/Template. The current default template will be highlighted in the dialog box. Also, you can scroll through your templates and see if you have a personal named template in the list. If your named template is not in the list, it was not properly saved as discussed above.

On where SketchUp saves files..... in that same Windows/Preferences dialog box, click on Files in the left hand column. There you will see the applicable default file locations.

Tim

Re: Chamfering the Exposed Tenon End

Strikes54: that sure is a nice looking tool case. And very interesting with the different wood materials. Several people have resized the case. I use my tool case every Friday morning to carry my tools to class. I used old growth redwood. It is very heavy when I fill with several hand planes and other hand tools, but quite handy.

Tim

Re: Making a Full-size Template in Layout

Teamman: there is a chapter or so in Google SketchUp for Dummies. I've found the online Layout User Guide to be helpful.

Tim

Re: Making a Full-size Template in Layout

To Teamman: This video is working fine from Design. Click. Build. I assume something in your settings is causing the issue. The video is actually housed on YouTube. So you may check whether you can view videos there.

Tim

Re: Kitchen Cabinets - The Engineer's Way

Nollie, thanks for the comments...

Have a look at Dave Richards' blog post at this URL.....

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/34801/kitchens-in-sketchup

Tim

Re: A SketchUp Woodworking Exercise

To gmfoster:

Yes, this feature is rather hidden within SketchUp.

In my eBook, I explain:

To create a guide point, right-click on the circumference of the circle. Choose Point at Center from the pop-up menu. (If that doesn’t work, click on Window in the Menu Bar and choose Preferences. On the Mac, click on SketchUp and Preferences. In the System Preferences dialog box, click on Extensions. Make sure that Ruby Script Examples is checked. Then try to place the guide point again.)

Tim

Re: A SketchUp Woodworking Exercise

To cusoak: Thank you for the comment.

My eBook is for beginners, yet advances to more complex furniture. It is available right here at FineWoodworking at this link. I think the price is less than $ 13.00.

http://www.tauntonstore.com/sketchup-guide-for-woodworkers-tim-killen-ebook-077846.html

The first xix chapters are:
1. Introduction
2. How to set up SketchUp for Woodworking
3. The modeling environment and toolbars
4. How to use basic SketchUp tools
5. Learn to draw precisely
6. How to make, move, copy, edit, and connect components

There are a total of 16 chapters. But if you get through the first six, you can make kitchen cabinets.

Tim

Re: An Elliptical Window

To WAIpaugh: No shop work yet on this piece. I wish it were "my design". But this piece was documented in a book by Batty Langley, "Treasury of Designs", in the 1700's. Apparently, George Washington copied it from this book.

Thanks for the comment....

Tim

Re: My Strategy with SketchUp

Fred, thanks for the comments...

On the rocking chair, the sizes of components were determined by the two orthographic sketches in the Maloof article in Fine Woodworking, a front and side view. I simply traced over these illustrations.
I'm not enough of an artist to see these kinds of nuances.

Tim

Re: Troubleshooting a Model

Dave, thanks for the note.

This link shows various blog items covering specific procedures in the book. In this list, you will see reference to difficulty working the tongue and groove joints.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/35752/an-index-ebook-references-to-dcb-blogs

If in trying to delete a line, the entire component disappears, then it could be that those lines exist within the definition of the component. Use your Select Tool to select the line. If the line lights up in blue, without the component also selected, then you can use your Delete key to get rid of the line.

If you click your Select Tool on the line and the whole component lights up, then you will need to open the component for editing, then delete the problem lines.

Tim

Re: Dimensioning Multiple Views of a Component

Timberlady

Yes, click on those little circles. When you do, only dimensions assigned to those layers checked will show in the scene. That is if you save the scene with those layers checked.

Nothing will happen unless you also assign specific dimensions to specific layers.

Tim

Re: Dimensioning Multiple Views of a Component

To: Timberlady

Those 5 layers won't be there until you add them into the Dialog box. Use the + sign to add them.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

Motohiro:
Rather than guessing the problem, please send your file in email attachment.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To motohiro

Congratulations on getting through the tongue and groove joints.

I suspect your problem on the rabbet in the Top has to do with not setting the Top component for editing. Before using the Line Tool over the guideline, make sure to set the Top component for edit.

If that doesn't work let me know.

Tim

Re: Chamfering the Exposed Tenon End

In this case, selecting the face with or without the border did not create the Autofold. It would simply move the internal face away from the tenon end with no folds.

If I hold the Alt Key along with Move/Copy Tool, then success as Autofold takes over automatically and creates the corner lines.

It seems you have to coax SketchUp with Alt Key sometimes for autofold to work.

Tim

Re: Making Exploded Views

To JAJH:
You put your finger on the problem. Make sure to use the "Explode" feature in the SketchUp sense.
Make a copy of your overall assembly component. Move it to the side, then "Explode" from the pop-up menu. Now you can pull the parts away from the assembly without messing with your component definition of the assembly.

Tim

Re: Making Exploded Views

To JAJH.....
This is Tim....
When you explode a component, the definition of that component still exists, and any copies are unchanged. so you must be doing something other than "exploding".

Just to be sure, are you right clicking on a component and selecting "Explode" from the pop up list? When you do this, you are not changing the component definition. The only way to affect the component definition is to "Edit the component", then all the other copies are changed accordingly.

The fact that you have nested components does not affect the above rules on changing components.

I'm sure Dave will also comment when he can.

Tim

Re: Quirks with the Push/Pull Tool

Winddncr: send me your file and I'll see what is awry.

Tim

Re: Cleaning-up After an Intersection

To Andvee2: Wow I'm impressed that you also have finished the book. Congratulations!. Thanks for that feedback. I'll have to try that X-ray thing.

Tim

Re: Quirks with the Push/Pull Tool

To Winddncr:The guidepoints on the leg turnings should have been placed in Step 4 and Figure 27, page 87. This means the guide points should be a part of the final turning after doing the Follow Me. If they are not there, you can go back to Step 4. Or you need to find the center of that circle by placing two lines that intersect.

When you say that Side Stretchers don't fit, do you mean they are too short, too long, or are not aligned properly?

Here's a tip on arcs.... always make a plane or face first before using the Arc Tool. Don't try to draw an arc in space, rather on a flat surface. To make the flat surface, just draw a diagonal line to create a small triangle in that corner. Then pick your Arc Tool and place it on the triangle. After you have an arc, you can delete the diagonal line that created the triangle.

If more trouble, you may need to send your file to me.

Tim

Re: Organizing, Bundling, and Printing Full-size Templates

Timberlady: I'm assuming the top edge of the head board is the only shaped portion. Also, that it is symmetrical. If so, then this would seem to cut down on number of pages.

Nevertheless, send me the .skp of the headboard and footboard, and I will place on large scale paper in Layout. Then you can take the PDF to Kinko's or other print service for printing.

Tim

Re: Maloof Rocker - Roughing into SketchUp

OfficinaPoly: You can contact me via email at tkillen@killenwood.com

Tim

Re: Kitchen Cabinets - The Engineer's Way

DallasDave: the .skp files are not available on the blog.

Tim

Re: Dovetails in a Shaker Blanket Chest

To UncleBrissels: The eBook is titled "Google SketchUp for Woodworkers", and is available for download right here from Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking.

Here is the link.....

http://store.finewoodworking.com/sketchup-guide-for-woodworkers-tim-killen-ebook-077846.html

Tim

Re: Woodworking at Veteran's Hospital

To dgbayliss: Thank you very much for your very thoughtful note and information. We are scheduled to attend an open house at the VA hospital next month. The new center for PTSD will be the focus of the open house. We will be there with our workbench and planned projects. This will give us a chance to talk with veterans about woodworking, and learn more about their interests.

Thank you,
Tim

Re: Kitchen Cabinets - The Engineer's Way

swingman: Thank you for the information and references. For years, you've been a loyal participant here on Design. Click. Build. We appreciate your comments and interest in the SketchUp quest.

Thanks again,

Tim

Re: Kitchen Cabinets - The Engineer's Way

To wef11: I retain my detailed drawings for students, publications, and sales.

Tim

Re: The Power of Scenes

To Ocampo: thank you for your participation and the idea for another book.

Tim

Re: Design an iPad Support

Gina, I've added a picture of the finished products. They are disappearing from my shop quickly.

Also, I appreciate all the interesting comments to this post. I'm looking forward to seeing other design concepts mentioned in these comments.

Tim

Re: The Power of Scenes

To Stevard: I would guess that you don't have the a common component in each of these scenes. If they are the identical defined component, then your change on one would occur in all scenes.

Right click on each of these components, select Entity Info from the list, then compare the names of the component.

Another explanation is that they are not really components, rather groups. Changing one instance of a group will not be reflected in copies of that group. If this is the case, my recommendation is to not use groups, only components.

Tim

Re: Elongated Holes in SketchUp

Modelguy: You can find "Google SketchUp for Woodworkers" right here on the Fine Woodworking/Taunton website. Click on the link at the top of the page that sends you to the books.

Tim

Re: SketchUp at AWFS

Paulwyo: No, it was not recorded. My handout will be placed on the AWFS website, so you may be able to retrieve there.

Tim

Re: Woodworking at Veteran's Hospital

To genethehat: thank you for the note and feedback. This will help us in the design of the program. I could have only hoped to receive a note from a veteran, and to hear from one who uses SketchUp has been an unbelievable bonus.

Good luck to you,

Tim

Re: Dilemma with Maloof Rocker Arm

To pht36: yes, I've now seen his videos and he does strange things with the bandsaw. Needless to say, we haven't adopted his techniques.

Tim

Re: Woodworking at Veteran's Hospital

Richard, your comments are so helpful. I hadn't thought of these issues and will discuss with the hospital staff. I was worried about doing more complex joinery, so maybe I can be more aggressive on that. I did not hear about any assaultive behaviors, and sharp tools were considered a problem for accidents.
I'm hoping to achieve a positive experience for all involved and your comment about the importance of their success on the project is key.

Thank you very much,

Tim

Re: Design. Click. Build. Has a New Home!

Pax, I'm sorry you had difficulty. You may want to review additional blog entries that showed, in video form, the process of making those tongue and groove joints.

Here is a reference to find these videos.....
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/35752/an-index-ebook-references-to-dcb-blogs

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

Riffler: I believe all the dimensins are there. Figure 41 shows the length of the middle tenon at 4-in. The tenons on the ends are equal and at 2 15/16 minus 1 1/16.

I've included a slight gap between the tenons and the mortises at the ends of the breadboard. This will allow some seasonal movement. I glue only on the center tenon. The outer ends of the breadboard are free to float with the weather.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

Riffler: just continue comments here. There is no way to start a new thread.

On your problem, it is best for you to send me your file. Then I can see if there is a reason you are unable to remove that face. Make sure you have opened the component for editing. Then trace over one segment of the circle with the Line Tool. This will cause SketchUp to recognize the hole in the surface.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Riffler: you mentioned some trouble rotating the ogee shaped profile. No need for using the Rotate Tool here, the Move/Copy Tool will do the job. The profile needs to be a component or group for this to work. The rotation I believe is around the vertical blue axis. As described in the text, you need to orbit your camera view looking down on the top edge of the profile. Pick the Move/Copy Tool and hover over the top. Click your tool on one of the plus signs that will appear, then begin the rotation.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Riffler: Your description of the difficulties sounds familiar, and leads me to suspecting that you don't have separate component definitions for the magazine rack pieces such as the Top and Side. If indeed these are independent components, then there will be no interference between them when editing.

I strongly recommend not using Layers as you have stated. This is risky and will make your modeling process very complicated and frustrating. Keep all your graphics on Layer 0.

If you send your model to me, I would be glad to identify the specific things to do for correcting these problems.

Also, if you haven't already done, read through past blogs, e.g.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/33040/the-most-often-frustrating-error
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/32372/tongue-groove-joints-in-magazine-rack

Tim
tkillen@killenwood.com

Re: Do you Click-Move-Click, or Click-Drag-Release?

To Amarro:

I did a blog post on applying carvings in March 2008, however these old archives are no longer available here. I have shown this procedure in my book.

I implemented the claw and ball foot by "branding" the shape of the toes. I placed the flat shapes in front of the shaped foot, Push/Pulled the shapes into the foot, then did an intersection.

Tim

Re: Evolving a Design in SketchUp

To dwbaulch:

The advantages you state sound all too familiar. I'm certainly spending more time in detailing SketchUp models. But that time is more than made up in the actual build. There aren't so many "surprises" in shop construction that cause re-work.

Tim

Re: Do you Click-Move-Click, or Click-Drag-Release?

To: saschafer

Thank you for chiming in..... you are absolutely right. I see what you mean about an advantage to click-move-click. It frees up your finger for zooming with the scroll wheel.

I think this alone is sufficient rationale for choosing click-move-click.

Tim

Re: Placing a Leather Sling on the Campeche Chair

To Templeporter:

We can discuss your request via email......

Tim
Tkillen@killenwood.com

Re: The Curule Construction - and Ancient X-frame Chair Design

To Templeporter: we can discuss your request via email.....

Tim
Tkillen@killenwood.com

Re: Showing Shop Dovetail Procedure (in SketchUp)

CapnRich: I print the full size template from SketchUp, then use Glue-stick to attach to regular poster board. Then I cut out the shape with an X-acto knife.

Tim

Re: An Index - eBook References to DCB Blogs

To steverd: You are correct that there is no information on that hole that sits within the groove. In the bench, the hole carries a 3/8 threaded rod into the Top and is fastened there with a nut and washer. In the book, I felt that we could skip placement of that hole.

On your second question, I can't understand why there are two dimensions there. Very strange, and I've now just deleted them from the file.

Thank you,

Tim

Re: Checking a Plane Angle - in SketchUp?

Alister, thanks for the trig challenge. I'll have to try that out.

Tim

Re: Checking a Plane Angle - in SketchUp?

Matt, thank you for the feedback and expert information. Indeed there is a slicing action that I may have discounted in the tearout possibility. You've motivated me to do some more experimentation on a difficult grain situation.

Tim

Re: Making a Bevel-edged Drawer Bottom

betsy T: I find that most problems occur in two areas:

1. Forgetting to open and close components
2. Using version 7 of SketchUp, and having the path for the Follow Me outside the wedge shaped component.

Version 8 allows you to have the path outside the profile component. After selecting the path with the Select Tool, then pick the Follow Me Tool. Right click on the profile and select Edit Component, then click the Follow Me Tool on face of the profile.

If that doesn't work, you need to send me your file to see what is happening.

Tim

Re: Materials, Colors, and Textures 5

To NashvilleLee: I am glad you were able to sort it out. You may want to review a previous blog entry by Dave Richards last October at this link:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/32016/a-tiled-floor-creating-a-material-in-sketchup

Although the subject was a tiled floor, it contains a lot of information on handling pictures on the Mac to prepare and store textures.

Tim

Re: 3-way Miter Joint, Chinese Style

To Allencarl: it is my understanding that the Ming Dynasty cabinetmakers would not have used glue in joining their furniture. So you are right to skip the glue.

Tim

Re: 3-way Miter Joint, Chinese Style

PVKen: Thanks for explaining your process for the actual build. Sounds a lot like what Andrew Hunter explained and showed. He also uses a router table with a 1/4-in. bit to make the cuts in the top of the vertical piece. He also uses a plane to pare the mitered skirts on the vertical post. He stressed the importance of starting with perfectly square stock, and careful accuracy in marking out the joints.

Tim

Re: 3-way Miter Joint, Chinese Style

To timmo: I made the horizontal tenon first, then assembled the 3 parts and traced over the boundary of the tenon within the upper horizontal component, thus making the mortise. You have to be in X-ray to perform this procedure.

Tim

Re: Dower Chest with Solid Tools

To rocknbike: You are right. There are always several ways to do something, and I sometimes pick the harder one.

Thanks,

Tim

Re: Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

To 1stWoodstone: I believe the wider and taller version is appropriate. I would now add 2-in. to the width (in front view), and extend the upper end of the back leg 4-in. higher. However, I would leave the existing height of the lap joint, and the lower structure as shown above.

Tim

Re: Where's My Component?

Killenwood writes: To KiwiPaul: In another blog comment, i see that you've solved the problem, that is to right click on the profile to Edit Component. For some reason, you could not do this in version 7. You had to have the path and the profile within the same context, that is both within the same component or both non- components. Version 8 corrected this error and now allows the path to be outside the definition of the profile component. But you have to remember to open the profile to edit mode after choosing the Follow Me Tool.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To KiwiPaul: glad you found the answer, that is to right click on the profile to Edit Component. For some reason, you could not do this in version 7. You had to have the path and the profile within the same context, that is both within the same component or both non- components. Version 8 corrected this error and now allows the path to be outside the definition of the profile component. But you have to remember to open the profile to edit mode after choosing the Follow Me Tool.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Denjamin: the tabs labeled Assembly, Scan, Othographic, Exploded, and other names are Scenes, not Toolbars. You will learn about Scenes later in the book. They are valuable for saving views of the model and it's components and are required to produce effective shop drawings.

Tim

Re: Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

To Etwin: Good that you were able to use the unfinished drawings. I ended up making one in ash. I did rabbet out the crest for the thickness of the leather- 3/16", and added cleats on the inside faces of the legs for attaching the sling. Also, I increased the width of the chair (looking at the front view).

Tim

Re: Flutes on the Pilasters

NickJW - Yea, Dave Richards caught that same thing immediately after my post. Since I can't remember which tool does what and the proper sequence of clicking components, I default to the Split Tool. With that I know I will get a consistent result that works.

Tim

Re: Tongue & Groove Joints in Magazine Rack

Steve, sounds like your opening procedure is correct. But perhaps the Partitions have been mixed up with the component defining the Top. When you push back that rabbet, there should be no effect on the Partitions. And doing anything to the Partitions should not have any impact on the Top component.

You can send me your file on email (tkillen@killenwood.com). But first check that your Partition component is only the partition. And check that your Top component is only the Top. You can easily check this, by making a copy of either component, and moving it to the side.

Tim

Re: Creating a Hinge in SketchUp

Steve, I sent you the file I used to create this blog entry. When making the blog I save several scenes so that I can capture each step of the process. Without the blog, you would not need this complexity of scenes. Rather you would do the steps in one place on one instance of the model.

Tim

Re: Making/Copying Chamfers in Table Leg

M1FDS: thank you for the feedback. I will try to improve the audio on my next videos.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Timberlady: Good questions.... I recognize there are leg components for example that are similar but may differ in some details. For example, front legs on a table may have common mortises to the back legs. But in the end, there are differences that force you to make separate component definitions for the front vs. the back legs.

To avoid having to do redundant joint details on separate components, I do the common work first, then use this component to make the new separate component.

I use the "Make Unique" component feature when I'm in a hurry and doing something temporary. SketchUp quickly and automatically assigns a unique name to the new component (but it will be the old name with a suffix of #1 for example). You can then later edit the name of this component to the final desired name, if you want a permanent new component.

If I know a new component is required, I typically do the "explode" and re-create a new component. Then I can immediately assign the desired name for the new component.

As usual, there are multiple ways to achieve the same result.

Tim

Re: Cutting the Ogee-shaped Cutout in the Magazine Rack

Josea: I don't think you have done anything wrong here. It seems I should have emphasized the need to make the back legs separate components. The back legs will have different mortises than the front legs, so it is necessary to make the back legs unique from the front legs.

I would make the back legs unique after the chamfers are made .... say after Step 11 on page 48. To make this change I would use the following procedure:

1. Select one of the back legs. Right click and pick Explode from the pop up menu
2. Right click again on the already selected leg and pick Make Component from the pop up menu.
3. Name the new component Back Leg in the dialog box
4. Replace the other back leg with the new Back Leg Component. This will require a "Flip Along"

Let me know if you have any problem with this. And congratulations in getting this far in the book.

I think I will do a video on this area of Chapter 9 next week.

Thanks for the feedback.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To myatt: the Tape Measure is a powerful Tool but can be confusing because of it's multiple functions. On page 17 of Chapter 4 I've provided the detailed instructions for these capabilities. To make a parallel guideline you need to click the Tape Measure Tool somewhere on an edge away from the endpoints or corners. If you click it on an endpoint you will get a guide point rather than the parallel line. Sometimes SketchUp will work off some inference which will also make it hard to get a parallel line. If you get inferences, then click somewhere else on the edge to avoid these.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To cjthescot: I understand the frustration and difficulty in flicking back and forth in the computer screen. We expected readers doing just as you've done - that is printing out the hard copy. An alternative that I used in creating the book was the use of an e-reader such as the iPad which can adequately display the book next to the computer with SketchUp.

A metric version of the book is not available at this time.

After reading your difficulty with copying the leg chamfer, I will prepare a blog entry video on this operation.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To ScarletJim: You are right to identify the alternative way of sizing those imported pictures using the Tape Measure. This is great when you can resize the whole model space. I've included that option in the book. I find that there are times when I must use the Scale Tool, so I want to make sure that readers also have this option.

In some cases, an imported drawing will include multiple scales. In these cases I make multiple copies of the imported image and scale each to the appropriate size. Here is one of the cases where I use the Scale Tool rather than the Tape Measure.

The Tape Measure method rescales everything in the model, so this can be a limitation on its use.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To peppersvnv: Thank you for the feedback and encouragement on use of video. I'm planning to produce additional supporting videos here in the blog on specific areas and topics in the book. The specific areas will likely be chosen based on comments identifying tough or confusing procedures.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To Elco64: Please refer to an earlier blog entry (Tongue and Groove Joints on Magazine Rack) http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/32372/tongue-groove-joints-in-magazine-rack

Hopefully the video in that entry will help - also some of the other reader comments.

I suspect that you have not "opened" the Top component for editing (right click on the Top and pick Edit Component from the pop-up menu). Then you will be able to draw the shape of the groove and use the Push/Pull Tool to push out the groove.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Timberlady: Please send your model to tkillen@killenwood.com

Tim

Re: The Curule Construction - and Ancient X-frame Chair Design

To starvncarvn: you are right that the chair needs some decoration. The originals were covered with fancy inlay of ivory, for example. So the builder has a lot of opportunity here to express oneself.

Tim

Re: Chamfered Post Table and Mortise & Tenon Joints

To Barb (Timberlady): Good question about stretchers. I really don't know how the experts would define this term. However, to me a stretcher is something that is relatively thin and connects legs. I use this term all the time for chairs where there are usually stretchers (often turned) that connect below the seat. But the term applies to other kinds of furniture, like this table where there are thin braces connecting the legs for strength and stability.

I am pleased about your progress with the book. Thank you for the feedback.

Tim

Re: Chamfered Post Table and Mortise & Tenon Joints

To Timberlady: Welcome back. There is a "Back" which is different than the Upper Front Stretcher, therefore different mortises in the Back Legs. I think all of the stretchers have identical size tenons. But the Back is not a stretcher.

Tim

Re: Chamfered Post Table and Mortise & Tenon Joints

To Bud: I'll have a closer look tomorrow. In the meantime, perhaps this may be the issue you are having:

The path for the Follow Me and the profile shape (trapezoid) must be in the same context. That is the path must be part of the trapezoid component, or the trapezoid must be exploded to work with the path that is not a component. This is a change for Version 8. In Version 7, the path and the shape did not need to be in the same context.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To WWP: I find the iPad to be a very good tool for viewing the book. In fact, I used the iPad all through the construction of the book.

However I am not using the iBook application. This app is not used for normal PDF files such as the format used for my book. There are several iPad apps for reading plain PDF files and the one that I use is GoodReader.

You can search for the PDF readers in the App Store.

Tim

Re: Tongue & Groove Joints in Magazine Rack

To Larrythewoodguy: As long as the sides are components, you can draw a select box over the graphics representing the Top, and make the Top a component. There would be no interference with the Sides even with the overlap. Same with the bottom shelf.

One thing that possibly could have happened is that you went right-to-left with your selection box. That would cause the sides to also be selected. The selection box must be from left-to-right so that only the parts that are fully enclosed in the box are selected.

Tim

Re: Tongue & Groove Joints in Magazine Rack

To Budlyte3: Thanks for the comments and congratulations on getting this far in the construction of the table. You are correct that the tenons are too long. They should be 11/16" not 1 1/16. Figure 16 on page 49 should say 11/16" on the tenon length.

For mortises in the Legs, I am assuming you are doing Step 19 as shown on page 50. There I am recommending to use the tenon on the stretcher as a guide to draw the mortise on the leg component. On some screens, it may be difficult in X-ray to see the outline of the tenon as it enters the face of the leg.

As an option, don't use X-ray and move the stretcher away from the leg slightly, say 5/8" on the red axis. Zoom in, and draw lines on the leg component where the tenon protrudes the face of the leg. Another alternative is to not use the stretcher at all, but on a copy of the leg, draw guidelines to create the border of the mortise location in the leg. Then use the Line Tool and Push/Pull tools to complete the mortise.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To timberlady..... glad you figured it out. Don't hesitate to let me know any difficulties here on the blog.

Tim

Re: Free Download: How to Use SketchUp Tools

To timberlady: Please let me know what you are having trouble with..... we can respond here on this blog.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

BuckySawtooth: I suspect that the Top component has not been "opened" for editing. Double click with the Select Tool on the Top to place the Top in Edit mode, then pick the Push/Pull Tool and click it on the face of the groove shape.

You can also get into the Edit mode of the Component by clicking on the Top once with the Select Tool, then right clicking the mouse and selecting Edit Component from the pop up list.

There is a change in version 8 with the Push/Pull Tool. In previous versions, you could select the Push/Pull Tool and right click the mouse on the component and pick Edit Component from the pop up list. This no longer works in version 8, and Google tells me they will be fixing this to work like the old days.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To ScottSh: In version 7, you could have the path separate from the component of the shaped face for Follow Me. You could select the path, then pick the Follow Me Tool, hover over the component shape face, right click, pick Edit Component, and click the Follow Me on the face. This doesn't work in version 8. The path and the shape must be in the same "context". You were right to explode the component - that is one way to tackle the problem. Or another way, is to make the path a part of the component.

When I found this issue, I let Google know of the change. I don't know if they will go back to the way Follow Me worked in previous versions.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To ScottSh: Again your comments are valid. The mortises in the back legs are different than those in the front legs. Therefore at some point you need to make the back legs unique components from the front ones. I would wait to do this until the chamfers are made, but obviously before the mortises.

Thanks again....

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To Papynouche: I don't have a Mac readily available to check right away, but I don't think this is a bug, rather a difference between the Mac and a Windows machine.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To ScottSh: I'm impressed that you've gotten through Chapter 7 and the building of the small magazine rack. Thank you for the comments and here are my responses:

Page 31: You are right that an instruction should be included to select and edit the Top component. Otherwise the reader is not clear whether I'm starting with the Top or the Side.

Page 32, Figure 8: I think the instruction to draw a guideline at the centerline is included in Note 1. on the figure (last sentence)

Page 32, Step 9: On occasion I may not specifically state an instruction to "make a component", or "edit a component". But you are right that the Front Skirt needs to be made a component.

Page 34, Step 12: OK, I see your point, however all the information is there.

Page 35, Step 16: Again, you are right that you have to pick "Edit Component" - just selecting is not enough. I may at times not be that specific in the text, especially in later chapters.

Thanks again,

Tim

Re: Bombe Chest - An Exercise in Complex Geometry - Pt. 1

To David5346, thanks to you and other readers, who bring challenging questions and models. I learned quite a bit from this example. Yes there are multiple ways to tackle the project. And this one requires going beyond Push/Pull, Intersect, and Follow Me.

It's fun and encouraging to see readers stretching skills and taking on challenging work.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

To ckm: there are no near term plans to make hard copy printed books.

Tim

Re: Special Announcement - My Book on SketchUp

Frank, I have contacted Fine Woodworking staff to take care of this issue. Should be an answer tomorrow. The Connecticut Stool should be a part of the download of the book.

Thanks for the comment,

Tim

Re: Maloof and Templates by SketchUp

To hbowern: We can discuss on email - tkillen@killenwood.com

Tim

Re: Seat Frame for a Maloof Occasional Chair

JeffB, I get very good quality in exporting JPGs or PNGs from SketchUp. After clicking on File/Export/2D Graphic, a dialog box appears. In my Pro Version I have an Options button that is set by default to:
Image Size is checked
Anti alias is checked
JPG Compression slider set to highest quality

However, in this blog I'm not exporting with SketchUp, rather capturing screen images with SnagIt. This allows me to include the mouse icon and tool icons in the images. Quality of these images is dependent on the size of screen and number of pixels per inch (which is usually around 90, I think). I'm capturing on a 24-in. flat panel, then reducing to 550 pixels of size, a limitation of the blog.

Tim

Re: The Campeche Chair Upholstery Rail

To Traveller2:

Thank you for the reference to the magazine feature article on Campeche Chairs. I read through it and studied the pictures. Clearly there are multiple ways of fastening the leather sling, including directly on the top face of the stiles.

I recall Williamsburg cabinetmakers mentioning various means of handling the seat, including a cleat option. My leather is 3/16" thick and I feel it needs to be inset from the face so as to be flush with the wood surface. This requires some rabbet or cleat to provide the offset.

Tim

Re: Materials, Colors, and Textures 4

KenT, I don't make the texture by appling to a face in the component, rather place the texture on a separate face. I do this to avoid opening the component. I think it is harder to place the textures within the definition of the component. It goes faster for me to keep out of the component. Also with this procedure I'm not editing the component which avoids changing all the component copies in the file.

You are right about expanding the grain, but so far I haven't used grain structures that are noticeable or sensitive to this. I suppose larger photos would help, but is not always possible.

Tim

Re: Materials, Colors, and Textures 4

Rooms, I must admit not knowing the answer to your question until I did some investigation. I did not know you could save your own wood grain to the default wood materials. Here's what I found, and executed without difficulty.

After you've imported the texture and it resides in your Materials dialog box, do either of the following:

Right click the wood grain chip and select Save As. Now you can browse to the Wood default folder under Google/SketchUp 7/Materials. Save your wood grain there in that folder and it will be available to new models in your Materials dialog box.

You could also click the down arrow/plus sign icon in the upper right of the Material dialog box to open a second pane. Point to the Wood material folder. Then drag and drop the new texture from the In Model library to the lower pane. This procedure does the identical action by saving your new wood grain into the default Wood folder.

Tim

Re: Lessons in Teaching SketchUp to Woodworkers

To hbowern: you can do all the very complex modeling of furniture in the free version. You can also create the shop drawing package in the free SketchUp. You need Pro when exchanging file formats with other applications. Also Pro comes with Layout that provides a much more robust way of making and distributing the drawing package.

Tim

Re: Lessons in Teaching SketchUp to Woodworkers

Jay, I would Like more information on your request for an oval table. Have you a specific piece in mind? What kind and size table? Do you have a SketchUp design started that you could share via email? What specifically in SketchUp are you having trouble with?

Tim

Re: A Maloof Chair Animation

Geppetto425: good question, I don't have 20 year's experience with these chairs. I am less concerned about the leg joints - they are quite robust and I'm using 4 1/2-in. Long #10 screws. I worry more about the arm joint which only has flat surface and a large screw. The leg joints do have a tenon albeit very short. I suspect I will have less problem over time with the Maloof vs. the Windsors, which rely on socket joints without screws.

I would not think using epoxy glue would provide any additional insurance, unless the joint is not tight.

Perhaps others with more experience will chime in.

Tim

Re: Easy Errors to Make

JonasMac: say you are doing a through mortise on a leg. There is no need to orbit around to the back side to finish the Push/Pull. Simply click anywhere on the back edge of the leg to finish the mortise. There are many operations where I click on existing faces or edges to finish the action. This includes moves and drawing lines. In many cases it helps to use the arrow keys to force the action on a specific axis (not required for Push/Pulls). In that way I'm able to move my mouse anywhere to click on existing geometry to end the action.

Tim

Re: Easy Errors to Make

JonasMac, I agree on the importance of getting in close to your to your model. One of the difficulties I see in working with new students is the tendency to work from afar (zoomed way out), creating lots of early frustration.

That is also why I'm continually harping on the use of a good mouse with scroll wheel. This is the only way I've seen of making the orbiting and zooming efficient.

Also I take advantage wherever possible of ending push/pulls or other tool actions by clicking on edges in other already placed geometry. This eliminates some zooming and orbiting. Also I encourage use of Arrow Keys to force action along the axes. This also obviates some zooming and orbiting.

Tim

Re: Easy Errors to Make

First regarding note from JonasMac - I forgot the item about guideline placement. If I understand your comment, some guides get placed in the wrong plane. I do use my Arrow Keys when placing guides in crowded areas of the model. This ensures that it stays on the intended plane.

On Dave's comment, there are cases when I really want the construction lines in the component definition, since I use it in many different Scenes and copies of the component. In these cases, I just need to remember the impact on the cutlist. By the way, I don't like cutlists and don't use them in my own work in the shop. I think they are very susceptible to error, and are difficult to control. I find that the cutlist is not a necessary tool for work in the shop with SketchUp files and drawings. I think they cause more problems than they solve.

On Ken T's comment, I have not had the problem you state in the cutlist. Also, I generally set my precision to 1/16" and also have length snapping on.

Tim

Re: The Scale Tool

Thank you for all the feedback and comments. After experimenting further with the Tape Measure, I agree that it is a handy alternative to the Scale Tool. One must be careful to not scale everything in the model, when intending to only affect a piece of the furniture. This requires you to make sure you are in "Edit the Component" mode before scaling.

Also, thanks to Dave for pointing out the way of avoiding the ratio for scaling. I was not aware of this feature. However, it is tricky.... you must complete the Scaling, then do the typing of the length.

Tim

Re: Personalizing Your SketchUp Settings

Gerry, my settings are applicable to furniture, not architectural. So I think you should start with the architectural template provided by SketchUp. After you work with this, you may decide to experiment with your personal settings.

Tim

Re: Tips on Zooming

Tom8021: I think you are doing just the right things using one file and scenes. To my knowledge there is no difference to Zoom when close to the Origin. When you say that you have trouble keeping the model in the screen, can you further explain this and what you are doing at the time of the problem. Also you can send your model to me on email at tkillen@killenwood.com.

Tim

Re: Are You Taking Advantage of the Arrow Keys?

CORRECTION: In my previous note I made a mistake in the fourth paragraph. In lieu of changing the Precision variable in the Units Dialog Box, I meant to say to change the Enable Length Snapping value to 1/8 or 1/16.

Changing the Precision variable will not help you achieve a precise length by nudging your mouse.

Tim

Re: Are You Taking Advantage of the Arrow Keys?

To tom8021: Click your Line Tool to start the line. Move the mouse toward the direction you want to go. Hit the Right Arrow Key to force the line on the red axis, for example. Then type 20 and hit the Enter Key.

(I'm assuming, but I can't tell from your note above, that you don't type into the Measurement's Box. That is, you don't click there. You just type and SketchUp puts the 20 in the box).

I'm encouraging you to type your exact lengths. You can waste a lot of time trying to make a line exact length by nudging the mouse.

However, if you set Precision in the Units Dialog Box - that is, from Window/Model Info/Units - to larger increments like 1/8, then it is easier to nudge to an exact length.

Tim

Tim

Re: Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

To astronomz: Thank you for the feedback. I think you are right about an easy construction. But without full-size templates from SketchUp, I think it would be difficult. I haven't built the chair yet, nor have I detailed the leather attachment method.

I am glad that you were able to be successful in the SketchUp model with so little information provided in the blog. It's good to know that readers are making headway from this information.

I see that you used the bspline plug-in. I am sure this is superior to my method of using several connected arcs. But I've used arcs so much that these things go very quickly, therefore I don't reach for the plug-in.

Tim

Re: Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

To JonasMac: Thank you for the feedback. I wish it weren't so frustrating, but I remember when it was tough for me, so I understand the issue.

On your question..... I introduce a centerline into my turned components at the very beginning. I usually have centerlines extending beyond the turning and these are indeed within the component definition. However, in steps 4 and 5 above you see the centerline but in this case it is not extending beyond the end faces of the leg.

Without centerlines, I would have a very difficult time connecting the turned components.

Perhaps I will do an entry on precise positioning....

Tim

Re: Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

To JonasMac: Thank you so much for your encouraging comments. Also, it is heartening to hear that readers actually try the exercises, and report on the experience.

Your issue with connecting the cutter precisely..... good comment. I always do my turnings with a centerline as part of the component. See in Step 8 above that the cutter has a centerline. This always provides a precise connection point. With the Move/Copy Tool I can grab the intersection of the centerline with the top face of the cutter. Then I can move the cutter to precisely connect with the centerline intersection of the turned leg.

In making Windsor chair models, I would be lost without centerlines in all the spindles, legs, and stretchers.

Tim

Re: Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

To SchreiberBike: I believe the urn-like shape on the flat will occur when you change the transition shape to an ogee. I do this the same way as shown here, but in Step 5, I change the shape to an ogee (reverse arcs). Also you can perhaps increase the depth of the transition.

Tim

Re: Guide Lines, Guide Points, and Linear Guides

To pvanwa: Thank you for reminding me of this very nice command. That is, all Guide Points and Guidelines can be removed from the model by clicking on Edit in the Menu bar. Then picking Delete Guides from the pop-up list.

I need to update the text of the blog to include this handy feature.

Tim

Re: Monticello's Universal Table

To WWinCCFL: I simply show the shaft and head of the bolts or screws (usually nuts also) with a call-out on its specs. I do not show threads. Dave Richards has a blog entry on making threads (I believe this was associated with a workbench and its vice screws. This entry is temporarily not available as the archive is being transfered to the new system.

Tim

Re: Monticello's Universal Table

To BetsyE and saschafer: Thank you for referencing the Tage Frid article. I was not aware of this one.

The results are the same, but the details are slightly different. As I understand the Frid article, there seems to be sliders but not guide bars as shown in Sheraton. The guidebars are grooved to accommodate a pin within the end of the sliders. Also, Sheraton has the iron plate and screw/nut combination to fasten the top in place. Frid provides vertical dowels in the top. I can't be sure of these differences, but this is my current understanding.

Tim

Re: Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

I'll try to answer your questions..... The Campeche Chair is new to me and I was not aware of this until the conference in Williamsburg. I have not made this chair yet, and there are still details I need to work out - such as the cleat and rabbet details for fastening the leather.

Williamsburg told me of a paper titled "The Campeche Chair in the Metropolitan Museum of Art". After retrieving from the internet, I found this very helpful in creating the model.

Tim

Re: Building a Table Top Breadboard

Zargon, my SketchUp models are not on the Google Warehouse or Library. I have attached .skp files to some of the past blog entries. Often I'm preparing models for teaching and for distribution to my students. In the case of this table, the model was required so that I could build the piece for my daughter's home.

Several of my models are available as Digital Plans on the Finewoodworking.com website. Others can be acquired through email correspondence.

Tim

Re: Thomas Jefferson's Campeche Chair

To Steverd: There is an entry just a few weeks ago at this link
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/22931/replicating-a-maloof-design-from-pictures

After importing the JPG, I use the Scale Tool to make the photo full size. I place a line of known dimension over a component in the picture of known dimension. I compare the two lengths and Scale by this factor.

The picture must be first aligned with the axes using the Rotate Tool.

Also, the above notes apply to a picture imported as an image and being roughly a standard view, such as Top, Side, or Front.

Tim

Re: "Components" in SketchUp

JeffB, it won't help you to group the components as you still would not be able to implement a Follow Me path across multiple components. Also, if I'm understanding properly, you will need to miter the cove at the corners. The way I do this is to run the molding with Push/Pull Tool the full length of the rail and stile separately. Then I "cut" a miter joint for the molding only at each end independently.

If I misunderstood, you are welcome to send me your file on email.

Tim

Re: Replicating a Maloof Design from Pictures

Meezo, there are a couple blog entries on using Photo Match in the Archives. Unfortunately, the Archives are not accessible at this moment. I have notified the responsible FWW staff of this issue.

Alternatively, you can send me an email at tkillen@killenwood.com, and I can send you some information.

However, as noted above in my entry for the Maloof Chair, Photo Match is not always effective for me. It depends on the quality of the picture and the type of furniture I'm reproducing.

Tim

Re: Replicating a Maloof Design from Pictures

Meezo, please have a look at a Feb 2009 entry on Effectiveness of Imported Image at this location.....

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/8386/the-effectiveness-of-imported-scanned-images

Tim

Re: Building a Table Top Breadboard

Clem2: I will expand on the Step 8 above where I copy the screw slots.
First it helps when copying these details to have X-ray on so you can see the whole slot. With the Select Tool, draw a select box around the whole existing slot. Since X-ray is on, you can see that you get a complete and successful selection with the highlighted coloring. Also, you can see whether your selection box may have been too big and included other segments of the breadboard which should not have been included in the selection.
Now with the Move/Copy Tool, zoom in and pick the midpoint of one edge of the slot. Tap the Ctrl Key for a copy, and move the copy down the axis. I find it helpful to tap the appropriate Arrow Key so as to force the movement along the correct axis. (Left Arrow Key in my case to force along the green axis).
Now with mouse find the line division point previously created to equally space the copies. Click your mouse to fix the copy at this point.

Let me know if this is helping you with the exercise.....

Tim

Re: Building a Table Top Breadboard

To divencar: Push/Pull is one of those basic and very effective tools in the standard SketchUp Toolbar.

Here is the Google Help explanation of the Tool:

Use the Push/Pull Tool to push and pull Face entities to add volume to or subtract volume from your models. You can use push/pull to create volume out of any face type, including circular, rectangular, and abstract faces. Activate the Push/Pull Tool from either the Modification Toolbar or the Tools menu.

In woodworking, it is one of the most used tools to make specific lumber components. Typically we create 2-dimensional faces of the cross-sectional shape of a lumber component. Then with the Push/Pull Tool, we pull or push the shape to the components length, width, or height. We also use the Push/Pull Tool to create holes and recesses as done above in the breadboard.

Tim

Re: Dimensioning Multiple Views of a Component

To: fastech370 I am still dimensioning in SketchUp not in Layout. I have not done much experimentation with the dimensioning in Layout, so I can't say much about its possibility to replace dimensions in SU.

I'm continuing to deliver SU files to users who do not have Layout. Therefore, I am motivated to continue my dimensioning in SU.

However, I do find Layout very effective in producing my drawing documentation, even without using its dimension capability.

Tim

Re: Using the Intersect Feature

Croc, that should work.....

Tim

Re: Style Settings for Woodworking

RVH, Randy, you asked about Style Settings. Could you be more specific about Style settings that you see are different in SU7? I have made some changes in my Style settings (primarily lightening-up the background), but I have not changed because of the new SketchUp version.

Tim

Re: Creating a Hinge in SketchUp

Cataline: At first, I was surprised by your question on whether I would be making the hinge. But then I remembered that my typical blog entry is on something I am actually building. In this unusual case, I have no intention to make the hinge.

Tim

Re: Making a Windsor Settee Arm/Crest Rail

To redryder (WA0FSE): I wondered how long it would take to recognize that second expensive hobby. Not long. I'm working 20 m and can hear MN.

I use the standard Arc Tool to do the trace overs. It reuires creating arc segments that connect tangentially. It takes some practice but I'm able to do it quite fast. SketchUp helps this by indicating a tangent connection by turning cyan color.

Tim

Re: What are the Special Strengths of SketchUp?

To johnmcm: Before Layout I would print out each scene and assemble into a document. Occasionally I would export JPGs for each scene and import into Microsoft Publisher. Then I could add text in Publisher to supplement the pictures. But now with Layout, these work-arounds are not required.

Tim

Re: My Strategy with SketchUp

To andyboy88: Thanks for the comments. I have to admit not using plug-ins generally. The only one that I seem to use consistently is Cut List. Occasionally, I've used Shape Bender and Taper Maker in doing chairs, but very rare.

Dave Richards, my partner in Design. Click. Build., has a very good knowledge of plug-ins and uses them regularly. He has provided his favorites listing in a couple of his past blog entries.

Tim

Re: Seven Beginning Steps in SketchUp

Don, I just checked the website. It is on and available at Killenwood.com.
Glad you've had success with SketchUp.

Tim

Re: Making a Window Sash or Breakfront Cabinet Door

To Gisli Balzer: I do not use a jig for cutting the 45's. I use my bandsaw with a miter fence. The bandsaw is equipped with a 1-in. wide carbide-tipped blade. It makes a very clean cut which requires no clean-up. If the joint doesn't quite fit, I can remove a sliver with this carbide blade to slightly widen the 45 degree slot in the rails and stiles.

When cutting the 45s on the muntin ends with tenons, you have to stop the cut before cutting into the tenon.

Tim

Re: Difficult Dimension Placement

To robscaffe: Yes that would work fine. However, I must admit finding it worrying upon seeing a dimension hanging out in mid air not connecting to anything.

Tim

Re: Maloof Rocker - Roughing into SketchUp

Edgarwood: I would recommend that you initially practice and learn SketchUp on a rectilinear project. I would find it more difficult, as a new student of SketchUp, to tackle this chair. And it would be frustrating as you have found.

Tim

Re: Maloof Rocker - Roughing into SketchUp

To CJMac: I would use SketchUp if I were doing a kitchen cabinet design. But I am not in that business. There are other applications specifically designed for cabinet work, and I have not used any of them. I am sure these specific programs have features tailored for this type of work, so you would need to evaluate the differences.

Tim

Re: Maloof Rocker - Roughing into SketchUp

Denis, yes I am aware of Maloof using multiple pieces for the seat. These pieces were bandsawed prior to gluing to relieve the scooping effort in shaping the top of the seat. This process could be captured in a SketchUp model. I do not think this changes the joint details for the legs.
I am using ash in a width which avoids gluing pieces. Also, I used my Windsor chair process for scooping the seat (with travishers).

Tim

Re: Seven Beginning Steps in SketchUp

Dear Seatoe: Your situation reminds me of my experience several years ago. I was using AutoDesk products plus Microstation and SmartSketch - 2D only. I wanted to be in 3D in the worst way, but the bigger systems were just too hard and expensive. I spent 3 hours in a SketchUp class in San Francisco, and even though the course was geared toward architects, I was convinced SU would work for furniture.

I spent the next 30 days or so working almost full-time to get my hands around SU. The 2D CAD experience did get in the way of progress at first. But then it started to make sense and I got over the worst of the learning curve.

Perhaps you can get into a course in your area. More woodworking clubs are getting involved in this, so you can check there. Also, SketchUp holds periodic training courses in major cities.

If you're in my area, there are more options to get over the hurdle.

Tim

Re: Seven Beginning Steps in SketchUp

To Design. Click. Build. Readers:

You may wonder why the week's gap in new entries to this blog. Both Dave and I added new posts last week but they did not show in Design. Click. Build. due to a failure in the blog software. I think the system is now repaired and those previous entries are now showing here in the proper location.

Over the last two years, we've worked to have regular posts on a weekly basis. So it was unfortunate to break that record. Hopefully, we're back to a stable platform.....

Tim

Re: Bending a Continuous Bow

denismo: I am very interested in your procedure. One of my students is having much difficulty making a successful continuous arm bend on a high chair which has sharper turns. Laminations may be a way out of the dilemma.

Tim

Re: An Important Setup Step for Woodworkers

tlilley: Thank you for the note on printing these blog entries. I just now printed the entry and was surprised to see all pages. Previously the system would only print one page no matter how long the entry (without comments) is. This is a welcome change. I think this will solve most of the problems commented by readers, even without comments.

Tim

Re: Making a Window Sash or Breakfront Cabinet Door

Dear WarmTone: I would not spend a minute looking for a router bit. I would use hand tools to shape the roundover, such as a shoulder plane, and/or scratch stock.
You could easily make a scratch stock shape out of an old scraper blade or bandsaw blade. The holder for the blade is a simple "L" shaped piece of lumber about 4-in. long and 1 1/2-in. wide (3/4 thick) with a kerf for the shaped blade.
Prior to using the scratch stock, I would use a shoulder plane to rough out the shape.
I also have a set of wooden hollows and rounds (old planes). These help me match shapes in reproduction furniture.

Tim

Re: Create Shop Drawings II

Croc: regarding Excel to JPG..... Unfortunately Layout will not import Excel, Word or PDF. (I think these imports would enhance the Layout application). Therefore, I export the Excel to PDF at first. Then I open the PDF in Adobe Acrobat and export to JPG. This is cumbersome I know, but is the only way I know to get my cut lists into Layout.

Tim

Re: Create Shop Drawings

Teamman: Yes, when I place dimensions into a specific layer other than Layer 0, it is the dimension itself that is moved, not any graphics or components. I click on the dimension (or multiple dimensions in a view) and use the Layer Toolbar to switch them to the alternate layer.

I do not place my dimensions into the component, with a couple exceptions that are explained in a previous blog entry (URL below).

http://finewoodworking.taunton.com/item/7025/rules-for-dimensions

I hadn't planned on showing details on using and placing items into layers. This is a big subject and perhaps we need to have more information in future entries.

In the meantime, here is a previous writing by Dave Richards on Layers.

http://blogs.taunton.com/n/blogs/blog.aspx?nav=main&webtag=fw-designforum&entry=78

Tim

Re: Create Shop Drawings

DiveMike: I will indeed be showing the steps I use to create the Exploded View. Nothing fancy here, and it only takes a couple minutes to pull a copied assembly apart. Components are a must for doing this.

Tim

Re: Create Shop Drawings

docparm: I will cover the CutList but not sure I will be able to help you with the "rough" lumber. I do not show rough thicknesses in the cutlist, only the thicknessed dimensions. I do show rough thicknesses in my Cutting Diagram however.

Tim

Re: Create Shop Drawings

DaveS48: I generally keep my dimensions on Layer 0 and outside the component definition. There are occasions where I need a close-up view of the component to more easily see detailed joint dimensions. I don't want these detail dimensions to show in the overall component view. So I will set up a layer for detail dimensions. Then I can set the Scenes to show or not show this specific layer.

When I make the detail dimensions, I originally make them on Layer 0. Then I click on the dimensions and flip the Layer to the detailed one. This procedure avoids my creating graphics on the wrong layer when changing the active layer and forgetting to reverse it.

Tim

Re: Breadboard Joinery for the Table Top

mnedman: Interesting comment regarding the failure of intersection in this case. The results of intersection here are very much related to the flush position of the breadboard flat against the edge of the top piece. SketchUp will not detect any intertection of the table top tongue or long tenons. I will show how this works in a blog entry tonight.

Tim

Re: Mirroring with Flip Along

Dear KTKOH:

Obviously, Flip along is only applicable for symmetrical models built on the red, green, blue axes. Thankfully, most furniture has this attribute. Even in the case of Windsor chairs, I design the left half only. Then in the end, I use flip along to create the right half.

You are right that a component's original layout has an impact on the flip along result. If for example, the table leg component is created flat rather than vertical, the flip along does not behave as I've shown in the blog entry.

My practice is to create my components in situ with the assembly in the proper orientation. For example I do not create my leg component flat, when it actually is vertical.

In my next blog entry I plan to show how the component's original orientation affects the flip along.

Tim

Re: Mirroring with Flip Along

Smith5963:

I do not share your interest in knowing how many lefts and rights there are. Especially when it would multiply the work effort in design with no apparent advantage.

Tim

Re: Mirroring with Flip Along

Smith5963: Yes, there is an alternative using the Scale Tool and -1. I do not typically use this method and prefer the easy right click and selection of Flip along.

Tracking the number of components is done by other means and does not require the drastic and mistaken duplication of components. Making unique components of a common design would create major extra work and frustration.

Tim

Re: Lessons in Teaching SketchUp to Woodworkers

Ken, I think we should be able to get you over the issue with drawing to length. My next blog entry will show details.
However, I want to check with you on your method of using the mouse. Occasionally I find that students have problems with drawing to length as a result of holding down the left mouse button. In SketchUp, problems are caused by holding the mouse button while drawing. When starting a line click with the left mouse button but immediately release, start to move the mouse down the red (or whatever) axis, then type the exact length, e.g., 2 1/4 and hit your enter key. That is all there is to it, but you must be tapping the left mouse button, not holding.

Tim

Re: Joint Push/Pull

Bill, I made that curved face by brute force and it is a tedious process. Basically I start with a flat face that I know is a proper shape and length. Usually I can trace over a drawing from a book, for example. Also these books will show a top view of the crest rail so I can trace the bending shape as well. On the curved face, which is not shaped except for the bend, I turn on hidden lines. Then I copy shapes from the flat face and connect/rotate to fit on to the bent shape. I suppose there is an easier way, or a plug-in but I am not aware of one, but looking.

Tim

Re: The Effectiveness of Imported Scanned Images

Nick JW.... thanks for the idea, i.e., using the camera to capture a picture of a drawing in the book, then importing the jpg into SketchUp.

Tim

Re: Guide Lines, Guide Points, and Linear Guides

NickJW: Thank you so much for reminding me of this very useful feature - that is, placing a Guidepoint at the center of a circle. I had forgotten how to get this to work in SketchUp as it is not an automatic capability. Dave Richards located this and points out that you have to have a check mark in Windows/Preferences/Extensions/Ruby Script Examples.

Tim

Re: Making a Window Sash or Breakfront Cabinet Door

JohnMCM: Yes I built four of these sash in oldgrowth redwood. The windows are in a timber frame building I built, also in oldgrowth redwood. I used 18th C hardware iron strap hinges and iron catches.

Tim

Re: Making a Bail for a Shaker Chip Box

1bri: my email is tkillen@killenwood.com

Tim

Re: Making a Bail for a Shaker Chip Box

To 1bri:

I'm suspecting your issues relate to "editing" the component. If you've used components, make sure that you do an "edit component" before making changes. Also, I'm suspecting that you scaled on the basis of editing the component, then de-scaled without editing????

Not sure about all that, but I can be sure if you send your file to my email.

Tim

Re: Making a Bail for a Shaker Chip Box

To 1bri: Let me try to respond to both your notes......
1. Push/Pull does not work on curved faces. You can use the Move Tool to pull a curved face (with careful selection of the entities.
2. Intersect functionality is totally available in the free version
3. When I'm using Intersect, often I explode the components or groups involved. Then I can easily Select All and do Intersect with Selected. This seems to give me better results than doing the Intersect Model option.
4. SketchUp uses two different colors for each side of a face. The blue color indicates that SketchUp thinks that is the inside face. Often I find that SketchUp makes the wrong decision on inside or outside face. So I'm making frequent use of the function (right click on face) Reverse Faces.

You are doing great, and let me know of other issues. I remember how frustrated I was in the beginning with SU.

Tim

Re: Drawing Pieces With Complex Curves

Baja Mike, there is a previous archived blog entry on handling miter joints of various kinds. The blog is in the old style archive and the link is:

http://blogs.taunton.com/n/blogs/blog.aspx?nav=main&webtag=fw-designforum&entry=115

Tim

Re: Continuing on Ladder Back - The Centerline Framework

Hoop36: The FWW staff are working this issue. I will let you know when the problem is fixed.

Tim

Re: An Important Setup Step for Woodworkers

Hoop36, now I understand....

In fact I also had only one page print. I will check with the Fine Woodworking Staff....

Thank you,

Tim

Re: More on Ladder Back Chair Back Slats

David, thank you for the information. I understand doing the two-point type of turning. I have done that before on a bannister back, which was a two-piece post. I assumed they would have steam bent the back post - I think this was much easier than messing with a double point turning and large stock. As it turns out, the bending method I used worked fine. I've finished the chair now - I did the whole thing in ash (original was cherry). Then I painted with barn red, then pitch black milk, paint. So I strayed from the strict reproduction style. Interestingly, I found a picture of the original I took when visiting the Wadsworth Atheneum. Didn't know I had this picture until after finishing the chair.

Tim

Re: An Important Setup Step for Woodworkers

Hoop36: I'm not understanding the question or issue. To print an article on DCB does not require SketchUp 6 or 7. You simply click on the Print command on the DCB page. I am sorry to ask this, but you will need to be more specific on what you are trying to do.

Tim

Re: Starting a Ladder Back Chair

Max, I'm glad you raised the flag of the beginners in SketchUp. I recognize that many of our most recent posts have been more advanced applications. Particularly chairs are probably the most challenging modeling tasks.

However, I think we do have a plethora of help on beginning tasks in SketchUp. Perhaps you have not seen the "Archive" which includes some 150 posts many of which are on the basics.

To get to the Archive, note the panel on the right titled "About Design. Click. Build.". In the bottom of this box is a link to the older posts, and when you get there, you need to look for another box in the right hand panel which links you to the old "Archive".

Also, we like to hear specific issues that you are having, including attachments to emails that we can work with and help you along.

Keep in touch,

Tim

Re: More on Ladder Back Chair Back Slats

David, thank you for the comments and offer of help. You must be right about the Pennsylvania look. I quote from the Lester Margon book, "This type of ladder-back chair resembles closely one belonging to William Penn, which he brought over from England. However,....."

This chair according to the reference, is from the Wallace Nutting Collection in the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford Conn.

I'm interested how you would do the bend of the Back Post. I steamed the upper half of each Post today, clamped them to each side of a thick plank in the middle, and pulled the finial ends together with a clamp (no form). I'm hoping that I've adjusted for the rebound in the bend. I will see tomorrow when I remove from the clamps.

Tim



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