JonasMac


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Recent comments


Re: A New SketchUp Forum

Dave

I know your a busy man , with all the effort you put into he existing forums which I visit , and from which i have benefited greatly over the years ( I often wonder how you manage such a sustained effort in each ) but I feel I can't be alone in wondering what is the rationale for another forum ?

Jonas Mac

Re: Pommels and Other Square to Round Transitions

Dave
Thanks for the response .
Enjoy the long weekend!.

Jonas Mac

Re: Pommels and Other Square to Round Transitions

Dave . Your choice of subject (the pommel /turned transition) has come at a good time for me , I have been trying to work my way through the turned legs on a table which has a number of pommels on each leg . I have been using the illustrations of a a gate-leg dining from a book which Tim Killen made reference to in a previous posting , Lester Margo's book Construction of American Furniture Treasures , (excellent book by the way)

I have two questions
1) Do you know if there is a way in Sketchup to fix the line of rotation of the Orbit tool ,i.e to swivel the pommels around a centreline as it were ? I would find it valuable to be able to maintain the same view /scale while turning the pommels making it easier to remove the waste after using Intersect .
2) The pommels I am working on have rounded /chamfered for corners . If you were to put chamfers on the pommels in your video at which stage would that be done?

Jonas Mac

Re: Placing Back Rest Spindles on a Chair

Dave

Thanks for the explanation /reply to my queries.

Even though there is a myriad of components out there your reply reinforces the need to have a good grasp of the workings of the native sketch up commands /tools , like the rotate tool and the in and outs of components which you mention at the end of your reply. Like musicians we need to keep practicing our scales

Also it was good to see in your video ( where you positioned the centrelines of the spindles between the two rings ) you exploited the facetted feature of sketch up curves which is often mentioned as a sketchup weakness.

Jonas Mac

Re: Placing Back Rest Spindles on a Chair

Dave
Thanks for the very instructive video .
Two queries
1) at about 8.29 mins in you formed a number of triangles on the spindle centrelines . I understand why you needed to do the first triangle , as you were forming the first spindle , but for the subsequent placement of the other spindles as you have positional centrelines already drawn and you have a centreline in the component for each spindle , duo you need the triangles for the other spindles ?
2) In using the scale tool to make the spindle component fit in the diminishing positions between the two rings , what happens to the geometry of the individual spindles ? . I have tried to replicate it but would be grateful for your take on the matter .

Jonas Mac

Re: Drawing a Bin Pull

Dave

Thanks for the response & showing the effect of your method in the Outliner .

You have used a bin pull to illustrate the method , but if it was a say piece of furniture eg. a chest of drawers , where the back plate was the frame and the dome was a drawer , are you saying that if one intended using a program like Cutlist
for scheduling out materials , you can't draw half an item , copy it , flip it and join it to the other half as you have illustrated because the frame and the drawer are both in 2 halves in Sketchup ? .



Re: Drawing a Bin Pull

Dave

With regard to your general approach of only drawing half an object , then copying , flipping the copy and joining it to the other half , I notice there is still a line at the joint which you hide .
Do the two halfs still form one object/ component as far as the computer /outliner is concerned ?

Thanks for tutorial . I personally find the videos extremely helpful , the points you make seem to stay longer in the mind .

Re: The Tape Measure and Protractor Tools

Thanks Dave.
I can't add to the uses for guide lines which you describe , but I would like to say that they are a terrific feature in SketchUP which I use all the time .
There is something about the quality of the lines as they appear on the screen/in the drawing which I think is fantastic
They add enormously to the quality of the drawing experience , getting close to the the actions you would perform if you were doing a drawing manually on a drawing board . I am not surprised lots of people like using SketchUp..

Re: Details -- Inserting an Ebony Spline

Dave

Thanks for the reply . It cleared matters up for me .

Jonas Mac

Re: Details -- Inserting an Ebony Spline

Dave

Hope you don't mind the feedback
I found the video , with the false spline and the real spline difficult to follow . I know I would have found it easier if there was a diagram / pulled apart view of the elements forming the corner joint in the beginning of the video as an aide to understanding the moves you were making during the video .

Dont let this put you off doing videos , I eagerly await and learn from them .

Jonas Mac

Re: Do you Click-Move-Click, or Click-Drag-Release?


I have found the emphasis which you and Dave Richards place on understanding particular aspects of Sketchup , such as the current blog, has been very helpful for me in developing my Sketchup skills.
With the plethora of information and Sketchup tutorials on the internet showing all kinds of weird and wonderful things , its easy to forget about such basics as drawing lines.
I have had a copy of Aidan Chopra's book lying around for some time but your reference to the section on the click move click method of drawing lines encouraged me to re read this section which occurs in the chapter entitled "Establishing the Modelling Mind-set". It all made much more sense to me this time round , having struggled with Sketchup for a while . I was even able to appreciate his jokes ( carefully embedded in the text ) this time round too.

Your forum is a great source of inspiration for me , I look forward with anticipation to each blog.

Jonas Mac

Re: Tracing a Reference Drawing

For some time now I have been wanting to ask the question how you go about ,just what you describe in this tutorial . Coming from an architectural background I constantly come across plans and architectural details in old books which I want to develop further in Sketch Up. One of the real joys of using SketchUp for me is being able to use the tape measure tool on an imported image once I have resized it , but by sharing the above methodology on this forum , this will allow me to take this aspect of my work to another level .

What a wonderful forum.

Jonas Mac

Re: A Look At The Camera Tools

Dave

Thanks for elaborating and helping me further in ways to reduce the need for excessive zooming and "flitting about "

Jonas Mac

Re: A Look At The Camera Tools

Dave

Thanks for covering this subject and the very clear explanation for the various related tools. The enlarged tools add enormously to the clarity of the explanation.

I was glad to be reminded of the usefulness of the Zoom Extent tool for seeing the entire model and for times when I get lost in space as it were .

I had intended for sometime to write to the forum for tips on avoiding excessive zooming , the effect on my eyes after a few hours drawing is noticeable . I find the use of the scroll wheel encourages zooming as it is so easy .
I was therefore particularly interested in the bottom tool , i.e using the Zoom Extents from the context menu as an " easier on the eye" zoom method .

I would be interested if others had views/hints on this particular matter .

Thanks again for the post.

Jonas Mac

Re: The Blacker House Chair Leg Detail

I like the way accuracy is maintained by copying /rotating the indentation on the other 3 sides
Thanks for illustrating a technique which I know I will be able to use in other situations.

Jonas Mac

Re: Easy Errors to Make

Tim - thanks for the explanation
I now understand where you are coming from and I will try this out in future work.
For me this is such an important posting i.e the use of SetchUp "for high quality drawing integrity " with which you began . Maintaining this approach during each session seems to be the key as it is painful trying to rectify ( or even finding ) mistakes when you are in the advanced stages of producing a model .

Jonas Mac

Re: Easy Errors to Make

Tim you wrote

"Also I take advantage wherever possible of ending push/pulls or other tool actions by clicking on edges in other already placed geometry. This eliminates some zooming and orbiting"
Could you explain this a bit further ?

Jonas Mac

Re: Easy Errors to Make

Tim
From your posting it is clear that in maintaining the vigilance required to minimise errors , frequent zooming in / orbiting is essential. As zooming and orbiting is such a feature of SketchUp I find after a few hours on a complicated this to be very demanding. Your posting gives me a chance to ask a question which I have often wanted to ask .
Do you and Dave have any strategies/ working methods for reducing the amount of zooming while continuing to make accurate models ?

Jonas Mac

Re: Easy Errors to Make

thanks to all for the helpful comments on my posting re Guides .
I will certainly look to including guides in the component definition which I know will save me time in the future .
Overall I am learning that I need to be more exact at each stage of the drawing process . I will remember Tim's analogy between the vigilance required for safety in the shop and the constant attention required in making models in SketchUp as as a means of staying out of trouble .

Jonas Mac

Re: Easy Errors to Make

Tim

It's good to know you are not perfect!
An area where I keep coming up with inaccuracies in my drawings is in relation to the use of Guides. I love using them to help in developing my drawings particularly where parts are not at right angles , it is so easy to get an offset with the guide feature . The problems occur when the drawing starts being taken over by guidelines and checking dimensions between guides which look parallel on the screen in certain views , the guides may be parallel but are not in the planar relationship I want and further apart.
Even so I find I cannot stop myself from using lots of guides ( probably a throwback from using pencil guidelines on a drawing board) , my only way of keeping some semblance of control is to regularly use the Delete Guides feature and start over again .

Jonas Mac

Re: Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

Tim
Thanks for the reply. A few comments/feedback on my experience with the tutorial & SketchUp first and then a question.

Comments
I find there is a huge difference between just reading through the illustrated sequence of steps in a tutorial and actually opening up SketchUp to try and recreate the tutorial illustrations/steps on my own screen. Apart from getting practice using SketchUp you are forced to think of ways round the problem when you screw up , often I remember a move used in a previous tutorial and maybe try that to get over my immediate difficulty .
The 9 steps illustrated in the above pummel creation look reasonable , but on my screen getting the pieces to line up , concentric on a centreline both on plan and elevation is another matter . As with my efforts on Dave Richard's original Fern Stand tutorial a few posts back , where I could create the individual pieces , legs, rails etc , but getting the pieces to fit ( even with Dave in my earpiece stressing the importance of constructing the members in place ) I still find difficult .

Question
The centreline illustrated in Steps 4 to 7 of the above tutorial , are these embedded in components , at what stage do you introduce them ?. Would you normally have a centreline embedded in the finished piece i.e after completion of Step 10 ?

Jonas Mac



Re: Creating a Pummel, the Square-to-Round Section in Turnings

Tim

Following this tutorial brought home to me the importance of building models in-situ ,which you and Dave Richards keep mentioning . In certain views things can look fine but looked at from another direction I can see I am way out .

In step 8 I had great difficulty positioning the transition cutter precisely both vertically and horizontally on the newel post centre line. Locating a pickup point on the turned transition cutter and matching this with a position point on the post I found difficult. How do you get over this?

On the positive side it is exciting seeing profile turn into a real 3 D object , for me this is one of the joys of SketchUp in comparison to other 3d Cad programs.
A further important element of the tutorials on the site is being able to use what I learn and apply to other situations in my SketchUp modelling for which I am very grateful to you and Dave .

Thanks
Jonas Mac

Re: Modifying a Model

Dave

Thanks for the reply, and for clearing up my issues I with the fern stool.
The emphasis on your strategy for drawing objects in Sketchup in both videos I found personally very useful . I have no doubt it will help me save time in my own work.

Jonas Mac

Re: Modifying a Model

Dave

The method demonstrated in the video was obviously affected by the fact that you had an existing model of your Fern Stool which you adapted to create an elongated bench.
In Sketchup tutorials/books we are often advised to only model half an object and then flip-along /mirror the other half . If you wanted to model an elongated bench from plans /dimensions such as were illustrated in the Mission furniture catalogue where you found the fern table , would you model half and flip/mirror the other ?

Thanks

Jonas Mac

Re: A Fern Stand: Demonstrating My Drawing Process

Dave

I seem to have got a bit lost trying to replicate the position the camera to carry out the adjustments within the leg as the video.
Doe one have to invoke the camera positioning tool or be in a particular mode to get the internal view illustrated in the video ?

I have gained a lot though the tutorial generally . I am aware that Sketchup is not a solid modeller, I can see the ends of tenons when I remove a face on the leg , It's just the positioning of the camera within the leg which is evading me .

Thanks

Jonas Mac

Re: A Fern Stand: Demonstrating My Drawing Process

Dave

"I orbited the camera so it was inside the rails."
I wasn't aware that you could position the camera inside the actual leg. What do you click on to to this?

"Before orbiting the camera into the rail, I opened the leg for editing."
Is this a matter of just clicking on the leg component ?

Thanks
Jonas Mac

Re: A Fern Stand: Demonstrating My Drawing Process

Dave

Thanks for the detailed reply/explanation to the points I raised .

Generally I am able to make sense of the detail in your reply and I will revisit the demonstration video to make sure I get the concepts lodged in my brain . I am much happier now with the concept of mirroring rather than flipping and I am grateful to you expanding on this important concept for me.

There is one just bit I still can't get and that is the the bit from 6.28 to 7.24 where you state you are working inside the leg . I don't understand the view ( it's dark inside the leg ! ). Could you explain again how you are getting the view of the interior of the leg ?

Glad to know that you had planned a future post for the wood finish .

Thanks
Jonas Mac

Re: A Fern Stand: Demonstrating My Drawing Process

Dave

I am a regular visitor to this site and find it very helpful in learning Sketchup A big thanks to you and Tim for generously sharing your knowledge with the wider world .
Thanks for sharing your approach to drawing in Sketchup which I found particularly helpful. Below find my comments and questions on some aspects which I feel I need further explanation on

1) General Approach - I found the approach of setting out the major components before getting involved in the joinery very helpful as it is easy (particularly when learning the program) to spend hours fiddling to get the pieces to fit .

2) Components + Flipping - The value of making components ( and making them before you move on to the next piece ) is very well illustrated and is clearly a fundamental element in Sketchup. I still am a bit hazy on the need for flipping and would appreciate some further explanation on this aspect of components particularly as it can save you time in other situations .

3) Opening Up Cpmponents to Edit - In the demonstration you opened up the leg component to facilitate editing for receiving the rail tenons . Presumably that means removing a face and restoring it after your done editing ?

4) Intersecting - In the video you demonstrated a manoeuvre using Intersect ,allowing you to clean up the mortices receiving the tenons on the rails. I didn't get exactly what was happening - Could you elaborate further just on that bit ?

5) Visual Appearance of Final Drawing - For me the addition of the textures added enormously to the final image , I have no doubt that a client would appreciate it as well . I am aware that your posting was mainly concerned with the drawing process but would appreciate a little explanation of how you achieved the finish on the drawing . ?

Thanks
Jonas Mac



Re: A Look at the Rotate Tool

Dave
I have never found the rotate tool very intuitive unlike most of the other tools. I had always wondered why some objects seemed to be easier to rotate than others ( requiring less mouse clicks ).
From your rotation exercise above I am now clearer about the initial steps of selecting /encouraging the axis of rotation for objects with faces parallel to the red, green and blue axes.

My reading of the next step is that if you select a protractor( axis ) color as red ,green or blue after that you just need two mouse clicks to rotate an object ,one to be the centre of rotation and two to indicate the line of rotation .
With objects that are not square on with the red,green or where you want the axis of rotation of a "square on "object not to be in line with the red ,green or blue axis , the protractor turns black after which you need 3 clicks ,one to start the required axis , two to complete the axis line and three to indicate the line of rotation .
Is this your reading of how the tool works ?




Re: Making the Wooden Hinged Table Leaf Support

Dave

I was able to remove the offending lines doing just as you suggested with the Eraser tool and my drawing looks like Tim's illustration- very satisfying - thanks

I should have realised that is why the right click is called the context menu but have learnt the hard way and I now understand more fully what "context menu " means .

I learned a lot from your earlier move tutorial and am now more confident in using this tool , but still struggle with the rotate tool as it is unlike the rotating tool in other drawing programs which I am familiar with . Perhaps you could devise a tutorial on rotating or point me in the direction of something already in existence .

Jonas Mac

Re: Making the Wooden Hinged Table Leaf Support

Tim

I managed to complete the hinged elements but can't get rid of vertical lines between the straight section and the curves to the "tenons" ( best illustrated in steps 7 & 8). If I try to erase the lines I loose other geometry , can you think what I may be doing wrong?
Through doing the hinge I learned that the right click menu has different modes depending on what you select , I couldn't get Flip Along to register and realised in step 5 when in front view I had copied the front face of the fixed element only and missed the geometry behind . This was worth learning for me because I tend to move /copy elements in Standard Views ( top, front etc,) .

I don't know why the myth has arisen (which I see often repeated in other forums ) that you can be up and running in Sketch-Up in a couple of hours . You would soon get found out if you were asked to do a drawing such as the hinge above not to mention the table itself if you didn't understand the program which is deceptively simple.

I enjoy the forum .

JonasMac



Re: Making a Recorder Instrument

I would like to say how much I enjoy this forum . Apart from marveling at the time you people contribute for the benefit of others , I find the images in the postings to the site very clear , the recorder head above being a good example . There is a very clear visual relationship between the drawing process and the actual objects being drawn , which I find very appealing .
I am not a woodworker , but an architect learning SketchUp . I know that specialist contractors like to have 3d views on working drawings as it ads to their understanding of the usual , plans ,sections & elevations, particularly if there are complex pieces of construction . This site has inspired me to carry on with learning SketchUp and get to the position where I can include 3D views on my construction drawings .

Thanks
Jonas Mac




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