JimKoren


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Replica 1880's Rocking Cradle

Hi everyone, I used a 1880's cradle, made by a friend of my wife's family, as the template for this cradle. The rocking cradle sits on a base and has a unique latching mechanism to stop the rocking...

Mission/Arts&Craft Style Desk

  This was the first piece of fine furniture I’ve made in 15 or 20 years.   I recently recovered my garage from my son and his motorcycles and I wanted a project that would test...



Recent comments


Re: Book Giveaway: Beautiful Boxes: Design and Technique by Doug Stowe

ok....add me to the hat

Re: UPDATE: Fine Woodworking's Tables and Chairs

OK...I'll bite! I would love to win this book! But also ... on the shop talk podcast it was mentioned that much of the expert knowledge couldn't be captured even in the detailed articles in FWW. Does this book contain some of that lost expert knowledge?

Jim

Re: STL 57: Tablesaw Accident Update

Update:

This morning while hiking with my dogs, I was listening to the earlier podcasts that I missed and found that in STL 5 you did discuss the SawStop technology. So thank you for that.

Re: STL 57: Tablesaw Accident Update

I'm very upset with all of you for your failure to discuss saw safety in a serious way. In the earlier podcast you almost sounded like you were ridiculing the person injured. Even here, with more facts, it didn't sound as though you took this injury as seriously as you should have. And in an earlier podcast one of you imply that a riving knife solves table saw safety problems. But if you review the accident discussed here, a riving knife wouldn't or didn't help.

I think there are two elephants in the room. First, you all are in a state of denial. You're like soldiers thinking "it will never happen to me!" Or with hubris "I know better." And yet we are all human. We are not perfect. Some day....but then it will be too late.

Secondly, for probably political and financial reasons, Fine Woodworking refuses to discuss SawStop technology and value from a safety perspective. You seem to be avoiding mentioning SawStop. I understand how everyone hates being forced by regulations and a patent to purchase their technology. But you guys love new technology. Listen to your podcast of you drooling over the Veritas factory and their products. I often see SawStop saws being used in your videos and articles. Mark Adam's videos on saw safety focused on techniques while using a Sawstop saw. He never once mentioned their blade stop technology but did say, while pointing to a SawStop saw, "Today's saws are much safer with their new riving knives and streamlined guard systems." Shouldn't technology and techniques go hand and hand to improve safety? Why do you seem to skip over one of the greatest advancement in safety and only discuss riving knives? What am I missing?

Lastly, the FWW Feb. 2012 article "Tablesaw under Siege" ended with FWW stating it would respond to the CPSC's proposed rule and that "our editors and experts can shed valuable light on the real world implications of tablesaw safety gear..." Can you share these implications with your readers?

Jim Koren




Re: CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

sawzall316 definitely has the best summary to date.

First, I've noticed was that fabrication shops and schools in my area are using the SawStop table saws. But construction sites and lumber yards are still using the old saws. Interesting that the lower skilled workers are afforded the least protection by their employers. This is a clear example of why we need better table saw safety regulations.

Second, the contributors and editors to FW are wimps more worried about their ad revenue than their readers safety. The latest videos on table saw safety don't mention this technology. Recently FW has added more table saw safety articles, videos and even a quiz, most of which don't even mention this technology.

In the "Tablesaw Techniques with Marc Adams" video series Marc talks about safety but doesn't even mention this new technology even though he is using a SawStop table saw.

And Roland Johnson spends a whole video on how new saws are now using the riving knife. OK, I agree it's an important topic. But isn't technology to save you fingers also worth a little discussion.

The moral high ground is to promote the technology. The financial high ground is to not piss off their advertisers.

How many FW fingers, or friends and family fingers, will it take for FW to see the value in this technology.



Re: CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

sawzall316 definitely has the best summary to date.

First, I've noticed was that fabrication shops and schools in my area are using the SawStop table saws. But construction sites and lumber yards are still using the old saws. Interesting that the lower skilled workers are afforded the least protection by their employers. This is a clear example of why we need better table saw safety regulations.

Second, the contributors and editors to FW are wimps more worried about their ad revenue than their readers safety. The latest videos on table saw safety don't mention this technology. Recently FW has added more table saw safety articles, videos and even a quiz, most of which don't even mention this technology.

In the "Tablesaw Techniques with Marc Adams" video series Marc talks about safety but doesn't even mention this new technology even though he is using a SawStop table saw.

And Roland Johnson spends a whole video on how new saws are now using the riving knife. OK, I agree it's an important topic. But isn't technology to save you fingers also worth a little discussion.

The moral high ground is to promote the technology. The financial high ground is to not piss off their advertisers.

How many FW fingers, or friends and family fingers, will it take for FW to see the value in this technology.



Re: Stephen Colbert Takes the Sizzle Out of SawStop

In the latest issue of FWW there are two letters from readers with opposing views. One is written with sound logic and based on first hand experience. The other,all emotion and no thought. I find most people against this technology are the same people who want their freedom now but will be the first to sue once a finger is cut.

What really bothers me is that the editors of FWW are afraid to take a stand. They repeat "facts" from the industry that are patiently wrong. (i.e. the industry's estimate of costs) They give equal weight to thoughtful dialog and irrational rantings. They ask us to send our opinions to the CPSC but refuse to take a stand. Matthew Kenney's comment, "Enjoy this for what it is: comedy." completely ignores the sarcasm in Cobert's piece. OR maybe I'm wrong and he just doesn't get it!

Re: UPDATE: Deadline extended again for tablesaw safety comments to the CPSC

Also, to submit a comment, simply go to the following link and press "submit a comment":

http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=CPSC-2011-0074-0440

Re: UPDATE: Deadline extended again for tablesaw safety comments to the CPSC

If we as consumers don't express opinions then we deserve the regulations we get. So please submit a comment:

Go to: www.regulations.gov

Search for
Document type: "Proposed Rule"
Enter keyword or ID: "CPSC–2011–0074"

Find "Table Saw Blade Contact Injuries" on the list and select "Submit a comment" at the right.

Re: The Story Behind the Government's Pending Tablesaw Ruling

As I read the comments of those before me, I find flaws in most arguments against safer saws but very few flaws in the arguments for safer saws.

I just purchased a Sawstop. Why? Because i know that some day i'll do something stupid and I don't want to have regrets.

Re: UPDATE: 2011 Fine Woodworking Archive DVD-ROM (1975 - 2011)

Ok...I'll bite....yes I would like the complete set.... but isn't the complete set on your web site, and without all those old out-of-date ads, and with additional stuff like videos and blogs, and I like the search, and my notebook takes up less room than the DVDs will, and I'll have to find my external DVD player. And does it still work? And aren't DVD passe?

jim

Re: Behold, the Speed Tenon

I've been using this technique for many years. But I'm much more careful than he seems to be.

Most importantly, the article doesn't explain why this technique is unsafe. Also, it doesn't provide any tips on how to do this safely. I think it is irresponsible to show the process without discussing why you think it's unsafe or techniques to use to make it safer. Somebody is going to read your little blurb, go try it out, and cut off a few fingers. Hope you sleep well tonight.

Why is this unsafe? Because you are pushing your hand toward the saw. You slip and your fingers end up in the saw.

Here is what you need to do to use this technique safely:

First, I've a very healthy respect for the saw (so much so that I now own a SawStop.)

Second, I don't do this free handed. I brace the palm of my hand on the miter gauge to guide the wood. The other hand, pushing the wood toward the saw, is holding the far end of the wood, no where near the saw.

Lastly, I don't try to rush it. I only take a little off at a time. If you take too big of a cut, you're pushing harder and your hand might slipe toward the saw, not a safe condition.

Re: Appeals court upholds Osorio tablesaw verdict: Feds consider landmark safety standard

People keep mixing owners and employees. If you own the business or have your own workshop at home, you should be able to do what ever you want as long as it doesn't cost others. However, if you employ workers who will use a table saw, it's your responsibility to ensure that they are protected by safety devices and/or insurance that pays for losses due to injuries on the job. The real problem is that employers don't honor that responsibility forcing lawsuits and government regulation.

Employers who hire workers without paying workers comp insurance should be sued if the worker is injured and the employer doesn't provide just compensation. The insurance companies can then raise the rates on those who don't use safety devices.

Employers are causing this problem, not the government or the workers.

And I'm sick of hearing about how it's the users fault. Even the best of us are not perfect. Accidents happen. Accept it! The issue is not fault, but compensation if your injured on the job.

Re: Blade brake inventor aims to compete with SawStop



Hey joe4liberty and other libertarian,

1st:
Don't mix safety in your own home with safety in the workplace. We all deserve a safe work environment. Those small businesses that don't provide a safe work environment are often greedy and leave it to society to pick up the cost. The lack of regulating "greed" has shown to be very costly. Just look at our economy today.

2nd:
I DO care about your safety at home because when you cut off your hand I'll end up paying part of the bill. If you have insurance, my rate will go up. If you don't have insurance, my taxes will go up to pay for your trip to the emergency room. If you have no insurance but are wealth, you will be wasting societies wealth and, although small, my standard of living will go down.

3rd:
God gave me only two hands and a non-perfect brain. So I purchased a SawStop so when my primary safety device, my brain, fails me, I have a backup.

Re: CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

ThomasStork wrote:
quote:

"1) pass a new law requiring ....."
"2) watch the free market ......"
"Bingo! No government intervention, and people ....."

What do you mean no government intervention!!!! Your first statement is "Pass a new law"

We don't want government intervention but then we do! I think many people here would not like the world without some government protections.

Re: CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

…..if you’re a home hobbyist like me, you probably need a SawStop because once in a while we will forget a simple safety practices between uses.

.….if you’re an independent contractor, it’s good insurance. One mental slipup could cost you your career.

.….if your employees use saws, you have an obligation to ensure that that one mental slipup don’t cost them their career, arm, or life.

….. if you’re the insurer of saw users, run the numbers and give the SawStop owners a discount if warranted.

.…. If you’re a saw manufacture, man up to your responsibility and do what’s right for your customers. At least offer some type of stop technology as an option.

….. If you’re Steve Gass, have you gone too far, using patent law to make a buck? Are you just the other side of the same coin as the saw manufactures?

…..If you’re the lobbyist for the saw industry, is your data accurate or have you sold your soul for the almighty Dollar! (Sorry but I keep thinking of the cigarette execs and the banking execs all telling Congress what we know were lies.)

….. If you’re the regulator, publish accurate information so citizens can make informed comments regarding any proposed regulations.

…. And if you’re the editors of Fine Woodworking, why can’t you do a better job than throw out a half baked blog on the subject?

Re: CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

I'm sick of people stating that the government screws things up. We forget about what the workplace was like before OSHA! There were 350 deaths per 100,000 workers in 1920. Today that number is less than 1 per 100,000. Do you really want to go back to those days!

Safety regulations are based on the simple premise that humans make errors and these errors shouldn't cost them their fingers, hands, or lives. Anecdotal evidence provide here doesn't change the fact that safety systems on equipment saves lives and limbs. Most managers in factories know that safety systems saves them money.

I've been working with table saws since I was 13 years old. I've yet to loose a single finger. But several times I've asked myself "What the #$%@ was I thinking!" after I did something stupid. We all have those moments.

So last week I purchased a SawStop.

Re: Router Injury Sparks Reflection on Safety

We all will have war stories. I have a few myself, luckily only 6 stitches after 35 years.

Woodworking is one of the few activities that OSHA hasn't required fail-safe guards. Maybe technology didn't exist a few years ago. But now table saws can be stopped before serious injury. Maybe that technology can be adapted to chop saws. And there are probably other technologies that can stop other types of tools. If we are not careful lawyers are going to make tools prohibitively expensive.

Maybe there is something we in the field(both pros and hobby) can do to preempt the lawyers. In the 80's the nuclear industry created the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations to self regulate and forestall new government regulations. It worked. Maybe we need to create something similar for woodworking. Any ideas?

Re: Mission/Arts&Craft Style Desk

CherrySquirrel, I used a router with a simple jig pictured above. I cut the curve after I glued up the apron and drawers. I then used a belt sander and cabinet scrapper to clean it up.

I spent hours thinking about how I was going to cut the curve. But once I decided on the router and jig it took about 20 min to make the jig and about 10 min to cut the curve with a 1" router bit.

Re: Could This Tool Change Everything?

Well, a A+ for the paint job but a few days late for a April Fools joke.

First and foremost, if your going to do a April Fools Day joke, deliver it on April 1st.

Second, be original. I knew where you were headed with each little skit before you said a word. Are you telling us that even though your about the only publication on woodworking you can't come up with something original on the topic? Obviously more than the art director are sleeping on the job.

Thirdly, you need a different mind set. Now that I think about it, I realize that the whole magazine is kind of drab. There are no tongue in cheek articles like the one at the end of Fine Homebuilding. I can't remember the last light hearted article I read. And I often know where a joke is headed before I get to the punch line.

Fourthly, you need to start working on next years April Fools joke now. If you work on a joke a month I'm sure by next year you will have the skills needed.

Lastly, if it's not good, pitch it.



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