GraemeSmith

RI, AL, US
member


Ex-Glasgow, Scotland I moved to the USA in 1996 and am now a naturalized American. I have a consulting business which advises small to medium sized businesses about the best use they can make of IT.

In a past life I have been a youth worker, Tall Ship Captain and I also worked in the yacht building industry in the UK and USA.

Wood is a high school skill, redeveloped to maintain an old colonial wood house and to build appropriate furniture for it.

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Contributions

Tavern Style Trestle Table

I had called at Dwyer Hardwood - my local specialist hardwood supplier to pick up a small piece of red elm.  I knew he still had some of the original fitch I had got material from before and I...

Colonial Tool Cupboard

I felt in need of some practice to "tune-up" my hand tool skills.  My planes were living in an old dresser - a constant pest to have to get in and out the old worn drawers and their protective...

Radiator / Candle / Side table

Living in a Colonial House has its challenges.  Colonial exterior, Federal makeover inside and out, 1950's heating.  In the dining room the solution to a large cast iron radiator in 1950...

Pencil Post Bed

This pencil post bed was made as a Christmas Gift and assembled Christmas Eve so that when the recipient came home from evening service - the bed had been "delivered" by Santa.  The bed is...



Recent comments


Re: iPad and Woodworking?

With plenty of other converged technology in my life including work computers, household laptops, computers displayed on TV screens and data spread around them all from the cable connection and smartphone tethered data on a laptop as part of working for a living....

I don't need a Kindle, Sony Reader and therefore by extension iPad.

You note I didn't define MAC or PC. I'm not evangelical for either - use both.

HOWEVER - I have NEVER adopted iPod for music as the original packaging of it with restrictive DRM proved highly problematic to my ability to use the music across the various in house platorms - and as long as iPad maintains this kind of approach - you won't see me even remotely thinking of purchasing one. For those who argue for Apple's share of the digital music market - see how even they have been forced off the DRM model by the likes of Amazon's MP3 downloads - free to use where you will.

Steve Jobs is right about Adobe's Flash Player being problematic for Apple's platform - it is not much better in the PC arena either! But it is a fond hope to wait for HTML5 - the adoption of which is some way off.

Which leaves FWW in a difficult position. My advice to FWW - do what you have to do if the iPad takes off - but don't leave behind the - I suspect significant - portion of web readers who do just fine with existing and mature platforms.

Re: Innovative Way to Carry Lumber in a Car

Polypropelene properly tied WILL hold a knot but it has to be properly tied and as it rarely is to take account if its slippery surface.

NYLON is NOT a good substitute - it easily stretches 10% under moderate load so loosening the load - even if the knots stay put.

Dacron (also known as terylene) is the best for occassional use. Low stretch, high strength, knots hold well. You will find it in the yacht chandler.

Or your local U-Haul has tie down straps with ratchet holds for as little as $10 for a 12ft long 800lb load strap. I keep a couple in the car for the odd sheets of plywood and studs that have to come home on the car roof rails.

Re: Innovative Way to Carry Lumber in a Car

Hmmm - Polypropelene properly tied WILL hold a knot but it has to be properly tied and as it rarely is to take account if its slippery surface - then the advice is good.

But NYLON is NOT a good substitute - Nylon stretches up to 50% in length before failing and easily 10% under moderate load so loosening the tie down - even if the knots stay put.

Dacron (also known as terylene) is the best for occassional use. Low stretch, high strength, knots hold well. You will find it in the yacht chandler.

Otherwise your local U-Haul does tie down straps with ratchet holds for as little as $10 for a 12ft long 800lb load strap. Hard to beat. I keep a couple in the car for the odd sheets of plywood and studs that have to come home on the car roof rails.

Re: Innovative Way to Carry Lumber in a Car

QUOTE - Don’t use polypropylene rope—the cheap yellow stuff—because it won’t hold a knot. Instead look for 3⁄8-in. braided or three-strand nylon. END QUOTE

Hmmm - Polypropelene properly tied WILL hold a knot but it has to be properly tied and as it rarely is to take account if its slippery surface - then the advice is good.

But NYLON is NOT a good substitute - Nylon stretches up to 50% in length before failing and easily 10% under moderate load so loosening the tie down - even if the knots stay put.

Dacron (also known as terylene) is the best for occassional use. Low stretch, high strength, knots hold well. You will find it in the yacht chandler.

Otherwise your local U-Haul does tie down straps with ratchet holds for as little as $10 for a 12ft long 800lb load strap. Hard to beat. I keep a couple in the car for the odd sheets of plywood and studs that have to come home on the car roof rails.

Re: Innovative Way to Carry Lumber in a Car

QUOTE - Don’t use polypropylene rope—the cheap yellow stuff—because it won’t hold a knot. Instead look for 3⁄8-in. braided or three-strand nylon. END QUOTE

Hmmm - Polypropelene properly tied WILL hold a knot but it has to be properly tied and as it rarely is to take account if its slippery surface - then the advice is good.

But NYLON is NOT a good substitute - Nylon stretches up to 50% in length before failing and easily 10% under moderate load so loosening the tie down - even if the knots stay put.

Dacron (also known as terylene) is the best for occassional use. Low stretch, high strength, knots hold well. You will find it in the yacht chandler.

Otherwise your local U-Haul does tie down straps with ratchet holds for as little as $10 for a 12ft long 800lb load strap. Hard to beat. I keep a couple in the car for the odd sheets of plywood and studs that have to come home on the car roof rails.

Re: Is it OK to sell furniture based on FWW articles?

Nothing I ever built from plans ever came out as "planned"!

Like many posts below - it is about adapting to suit circumstance. If you check my name in the Gallery you will find I try and describe what influenced the design of the piece - and that can be an adaption of a FWW article, an integration of innumerable examined pieces or a simple table top with four legs that dates from time immemorial.

Kayaks built from a kit were "adapted" in light of my boatbuilder experience and certainly came out differently than as designed. http://graemejwsmith.com/kayaks

For some time now my "bucket list" has included a rocking chair. One that actually fits me! I can't tell you the number I have sat on in furniture show rooms and at craft and wood working shows that simply don't. And yes - it would be nice if it looked "Maloofish". Prior to Sam's death I had started my research. I bought Hal Taylor's plans because he promised the secrets of scaling to fit (he delivers). I bought Charles Brock's plans because his chair is closer to my aesthetic. But it won't fit me! In the end I'm going to draw my own plans based on an adaption of Brock's lines scaled with Taylor's research. Both are selling a design they discuss as Maloof inspired (to differing degrees). Taylor makes no copyright claims anywhere in the supplied materials. Brock claims copyright on everything.

In as much as either of them provide photographs, the work of producing lines on paper, text and video - I'll grant them copyright - even if not claimed. It would be egregious to copy all their material and then try and sell it.

Do I agree that their design is "copyright" - no I don't - they freely acknowledge their inspiration. In fact they would need to make a claim that they had sold me only one licence to produce one chair before we would be getting serious. To be fair to them - I don't think either ARE because each details how to make the patterns long lasting enough for re-use. Taylor even recognizes you might set out to make money from them as a justification for what he charges.

If I am actually completely mechanically copying to the tiniest degree - your plans - because they made my life easier - then I think you are entitled to a commission or royalty payment.

If I am adapting and adjusting from mankind's integration and synthesis of all that has gone before to suit the client (usually me!) I am entitled to all I earn!

Re: Pencil post bed

Too funny - we both strted with the same FWW article I think! We also put a chest at the bottom of our bed>

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/17296/federal-pencil-post-bed

Re: "New Yankee" toolchest

"It isn't much compared to other's beautiful efforts; however this was the first cabinet I built - so I was pretty happy with the result."

And that is what matters! I see stuff on here that blows me away and that I would never tackle - usually because it doesn't fit in my world once made. I wonder about posting my own stuff.

But truly - WELL DONE. You made it, you enjoy it and you are rightly proud to post it.

Re: Pine Wall Cupboard

Justin,

Nice - I did that piece, from the same article, as a cupboard for my planes:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/17331/colonial-tool-cupboard



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