Ed_Pirnik

Ed Pirnik, CT, US
Senior Web Producer


Raised in Madison, Connecticut, where he spent his high school and college years apprenticing as a timber-frame carpenter, Ed Pirnik traded in his tool belt for a notepad and camera upon college graduation. Arriving in New York City, he spent over eight years in the journalism industry as a photographer, writer and editor. During that time, he worked with a talented group of journalists around the world, crafting stories on a variety of issues including conflict, travel and national politics.

Never one for the big city, Ed returned to Connecticut in 2009 to become a Web Producer at Taunton Press, where he has been able to combine his interest in media with his love for woodworking. Today you can find him at work on FineWoodworking.com.

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Contributions

The Most Incredible Table You'll Ever See

Just try to wrap your head around this engineering marvel

Adventures in Banding

Making barber pole banding is a lot easier than you might think

My Favorite Woodworking Documentary of the Year

Either I wear my heart on my sleeve or the production team that put this video together did one hell of a good job. Eric Hollenbeck is a 66 year-old Vietnam veteran and owner/operator of Blue Ox...

Reimagining American Furniture Classics

This Winsdor rocker is unlike anything you've seen before

A Dash of Workshop Inspiration for a Long Holiday Weekend

If this furnituremaker's workshop doesn't inspire you to pick up a chisel, then perhaps nothing will.

Matt Kenney's Ultimate Jig

Are your skills sharp enough to pull off this incredible jig?

Router Accident is a Great Lesson in Climb Cutting

Nothing except my ego was hurt, but this little incident is a heck of a good teaching aid

Top Tips for a Wet Box

Box building tips for a soggy environment

Garden Chair

Wood-bending master Michael C. Fortune shows you how to build a beautiful garden chair with classy curves.

How to Mount Side Rail Hinges

Side rail hinges are a great choice for fine boxes

Shopmade Handles Make a Matched Set

Learn how to craft custom chisel handles with leather accents and create your own matched set

Life, Death, and Sawdust

An Austin-based furniture-maker crafts a casket befitting of his family's matriarch

Flatten Wide Boards without a Big Jointer

A simple trick converts your planer into a jointer--sort of

You Can't Beat the Physics of Kickback

This startling example of kickback just goes to show that Mother Nature always wins

Shining a Light on Student Furniture

Sometimes a little inspiration is all you need to get yourself into the workshop. Highlights from the 2013 AWFS Fresh Wood competition should serve just that purpose!

Sam Maloof's Reflections on Woodworking

A vintage documentary features Maloof in the shop and at home

New Program Aims to Honor Fallen Soldiers

New program hopes to enlist woodworkers to craft memorial flag cases for fallen heroes

Own a Lathe Christened by Richard Raffan

A rare opportunity to purchase a discounted lathe christened by Richard Raffan

Possum: It's What's for Dinner

FWW contributor Tim Rousseau cooks up some laughs during a recent video shoot

Build a Basic Workbench with Built-in Storage

Woodworking legend Philip C. Lowe shows you how to build a workbench that doubles as a tool storage center.

Calculating for Wood Movement

It's time for me to put an end to voodoo science and silly guesswork when it comes to wood movement

Fine Woodworking Live Holds its First Build-Off

90 minutes, eight 2x4's, and two basic power tools. Oh, and did I mention contestants had no idea what they'd be building until the last possible moment?

The Ghostly Woodworker

A ghostly woodworkers marks, cuts, glues, and finishes wood without ever being seen. How'd he do it?

Crisp Tenon Shoulders with Your Chisel

Sometimes it's nice to turn off your tablesaw and do things the old-fashioned way

A Shop to Inspire

Grab a dash of inspiration from this California shop's gaggle of young, determined, back pat-worthy woodworkers

Shop Talk Live 37: SawStop Portable in the Works

We report live from one of the biggest woodworking machinery shows in the nation, and get the inside scoop on SawStop's long-anticipated portable benchtop model.

AWFS: A Mobile CNC You Bring to Your Workpiece

The folks at Shopbot are dubbing their latest innovation a "universal digital power tool," ushering in a whole new tool category yet to be fully fleshed out. These are untested, exciting...

AWFS: Rockler Set to Release Computer-Controlled Router Table

Rockler builds a "smarter" router table fence

AWFS: Safer Spur Center for Turners

FWW contributing author teams up with Rikon to release a safety conscious spur center

AWFS: Nova's Quick Change Lathe Chuck is a Game Changer

Nova introduces the era of warp speed jaw changes

AWFS: Rockler Takes Glue-Tech to the Next Level

Rockler expands its line of handy silicone glue brushes with an entire array of accessories

AWFS: Apollo Releases New Cost-Conscious HVLP Spray Finish Line

With the same turbine motor as their more costly brethren, Apollo's new line of HVLP rigs might just offer a solid entry into spray finishing

How to Fix a Bad Bullet Catch

It's easy to misalign a bullet catch when building cabinet doors, but it's just as easy to fix the problem.

Boston's Bombe Love Affair

Find out how the Bombe style arrived in colonial America, and what it takes for a craftsman to pull off woodworking's Mount Everest

Homegrown Lathe Duplicator

Need to duplicate table legs and other items on the lathe? This homegrown tool ought to get the job done!

The Soul of a Workshop

Exploring the dusty past of a woodworking legend and preserving Nakashima's vision through music

Terrific Table Plans

Gear up for next year’s winter feasts now, with 5 free top-notch table designs

3 Sleds for Better Crosscuts

A well-built crosscut sled will reward you with accurate cuts for years to come

How Does a Fine Woodworker Change a Lightbulb?

We answer the age-old question and fill our readership in on an upcoming live event with your favorite woodworkers

Add an Inlaid Signature to Your Work

Learn a fast, simple technique for affixing a permanent signature to your woodworking projects

May I present FWW managing editor Tom McKenna

Catch a glimpse of the lighter side of our managing editor at work

Eight Tips for Securing Work to a Benchtop

A few of my favorite ways to secure a variety of workpieces to my benchtop for traditional handplaning

Like a Kid in a Candy Shop

Period furniture master Philip C. Lowe's workshop is a fountain of inspiration

Crafting a Hardwood Mustache

While they may be a bit disturbing to look at, actor/woodworker Nick Offerman's handcrafted hair and mustache are emblematic of a talented craftsman

This is a test for erickson

Robert Erickson

Faking a Ship-Lapped Cabinet Back

A lazy woodworker mimics a ship-lapped back...without all the ship-lap.

Bandsawn Dovetails: Tails AND Pins

Two simple jigs produce all your defining cuts quickly and easily at the bandsaw

Fine Woodworking's 15 Minutes of Fame

FWW editor Asa Christiana and contributing editor Christ Becksvoort become actors?

FineWoodworking.com Gets a Makeover

It's been a long time coming, but FWW.com finally got a face lift

The Not-So-Big Workbench

Ed Pirnik shows you how to build a moderately-sized workbench featuring a solid maple top and tons of tool storage.

Help Complete the Vision of George Nakashima

Two upcoming events will raise funds to help complete the vision of George Nakashima

How to Make a Scratch Stock for Beading

Turn scrap steel into a one-of-a-kind beading tool for fine furniture projects

Shop Talk Live 12: Special Guest Nick Offerman

Special guests Nick Offerman and Christian Becksvoort join us in this remote edition of Shop Talk Live, from the floor of Fine Woodworking magazine's very first live event.

Custom Chisel Storage for a Brand New Bench

A customized drawer for my chisels helps keep my workbench neat and organized

Neckties and Tablesaws Just Don't Mix

A safety-conscious California Assemblyman sets his sights on tablesaw safety but comes up short

Intermediate Workbench Video Series

A serious workbench for woodworkers with limited shop space

Last-Minute Gifts for Woodworking Dads

In search of a Father's Day gift idea? We asked our own woodworking dads for some last-minute gift ideas.

How to Mortise Brass Ring Pulls

Beautiful brass ring pulls are worth the extra time spent producing the perfect mortise

Gearing Up for a Workbench Video Workshop Series

Lumber, materials, and hardware for a brand-new workbench have just arrived. Now it's time to film a new Fine Woodworking video series!

Part 3: A Violin is Born at Fine Woodworking

In part 3 of an ongoing series on building a violin from scratch. I cover the initial contouring of the instrument's top.

Video Sneak-Peek of New Groundbreaking Video Workshop Series

All the woodworking rules you thought you knew are about to be broken. Catch a glimpse of our next groundbreaking Video Workshop project.

Nick Offerman: Woodworker and Actor

Note to fans: This man is a woodworker who happens to act on the side.

Part 2: A Violin is Born at Fine Woodworking

With all the rib pieces glued up and faired smooth, the violin is ready for a spruce top and a maple bottom

A Violin is Born at Fine Woodworking

Tiny handplanes, figured woods, and beautiful form: this woodworker just can't resist the temptation to build a violin.

Play Against the Grain: One Lazy Latheman

Welcome to the second edition of Against the Grain, a brand-new game from FineWoodworking.com. ATG is meant to teach up-and-coming woodworkers some valuable lessons on safety and technique. For those...

Fine Woodworking's Ace on the House Podcast Appearance

Learn how Fine Woodworking magazine weaseled its way into a conversation about "paddle making, drilling with dynamite, and remote control bidets."

Duncan Phyfe: Master Cabinetmaker

Two fantastic collections of original works by Duncan Phyfe just beg to be seen.

UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

Everything was going great. I was just about to begin the finishing process when what do I notice? A chip in my beautiful rosewood veneer!

Repairing a Checked Tabletop

An unlikely tool comes into play during the repair of a checked tabletop

Maloof Exhibit Mounted in California

Maloof fans won't want to miss this extensive exhibit in southern California

When Good Glue Goes Bad

Selecting the right color of glue is sometimes just as important as selecting the right "type" of glue.

Enter to win a wooden kayak kit from Pygmy Boats

To celebrate their 2011 Reader's Choice Award, Pygmy Boats is giving away a Coho kayak kit

Drool-Worthy Workshop Videos for 2012

Feed your woodworking addiction with a triple-dose of some of our favorite shops and sawmills.

How to Make Arts & Crafts-style Drawer Pulls

Some simple tricks with a router and a drill press yield perfect pulls.

Chris Becksvoort and David Yepez: Mano a Mano

It takes a tough man to challenge Fine Woodworking contributing editor Chris Becksvoort to a dovetail face-off. Find out if David Yepez "has the gumption!"

Perfect Bevels on a Bench Grinder

You don't need an expensive wet grinder to obtain a perfect hollow grind on your finest chisels. An inexpensive bench grinder will get the job done just as well—if you know how.

Video Workshops: This is how we do it

Silly, absurd, ridiculous shenanigans at the conclusion of a Video Workshop shoot

How to Set Wood Sap

Learn how to deal with sappy pine boards using a common kitchen item!

Birth Interrupts FWW Video Shoot

If you've already flipped through the pages of Fine Woodworking #222, you may have noticed a promotion near the front of the issue for an upcoming Video Workshop series with Garrett Hack. His fir and...

Fine Woodworking on the David Letterman Show

David Letterman has a look at Fine Woodworking magazine on the Late Show.

Get Ready to Cut Some D'uhvetails

Ever struggled over the definition of a "jignoramous," or wracked your brain trying to figure what the heck a "chiselephant" is? Yeah. Us, too.

Advanced Stringing Techniques for Spectacular Furniture

Learn how to execute seemingly tricky curved stringing for your finest furniture.

A New Home for Mouth-Watering Marquetry

Woodworking inspiration via a new site dedicated to the craft of inlay and marquetry.

Caption Contest Winner!

A recent video workshop shoot sparked a brand-new caption contest, and we've finally got our winner.

Easy Tip for Tighter Mortise-and-Tenon Joints

This simple technique takes only a minute to perform, yet it will greatly improve the fit of your mortise-and-tenon joinery.

AWFS Tool News: Festool Launches Drill for Under $300

Festool's latest tool announcement gives your wallet a bit of a break.

AWFS Tool News: Rikon to Release "Ultimate" Bandsaw

With a word like "ultimate" in the model name, this bandsaw better pack a powerful punch!

Climb Cutting, Routers, and Tool Safety

Is it safe to climb cut on a router table? Opinions abound and I'm curious as to what our readers' take is.

Fine Woodworking and the iPad

Notes on the publishing industry's love/hate relationship with the iPad and how FWW is addressing evolving technologies

Framing Franklin

Building a 23K gold gilded picture frame befitting of a founding father.

Stupefying Engineering in an 18th Century Table

See how an 18th-century French woodworker incorporated a dizzying array of gears and ratchets into a stunning marquetry table.

CPSC Drafting New Tablesaw Regulations

Federal government is one step closer to mandating new tablesaw safety regulations

Homemade Hand Tool Cuts Leather Clean and True

I recently began using leather for accents in some of my furniture but needed a way to chop the material cleanly, rather than cut it with a knife. Learn how to build a simple tool for cutting leather clean and true.

Antiqued Credenza-Style Entertainment Center

Entertainment center features a cherry top and an antiqued milk paint finish for the cabinet base.

Furniture Lab: Recycling Found Objects into Fine Furniture

Find out what happens when a group of Fine Woodworking staffers pick their way through a treasure-trove of junk (or is it?) and head into the workshop.

Ed's Tiny Shop

Here's an initial attempt at trying to make a tiny space work!

SIM Re-Test Dips Version

SIM Re-Test Dips Version

SIM Re-Test Dissolves Version

SIM Re-Test Dissolves Version

SIM Re-Test - Cuts Version

SIM Re-Test - Cuts Version

SIM Test Cuts

SIM Test Cuts

SIM Test Dips

SIM Test Dips

FWW Introduces New iPad Woodworking Apps

In response to lots of queries concerning FineWoodworking.com's potential for iPad integration, we're releasing three new woodworking Apps for everybody's favorite Apple product!

Could This Tool Change Everything?

Find out why this new prototype tool just might prove to be the safety revolution we've all been waiting for.

Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

Play the latest installment of our online woodworking game and you'll have a chance at bringing home a free book on outdoor woodworking projects.

Rosewood and Wenge Humidor

This rosewood humidor has an interesting Cuban connection.

Free Chapter Download: Vacuum Press Basics

Learn vacuum press basics with a brand-new free chapter download!

Homemade Slot Mortiser Has all the Right Moves

This little rig is an example of homespun ingenuity at it's finest. Learn how one woodworker built their own slot mortising machine from scratch!

Free Woodworking Plan: Build a Splay-Legged Table

Learn how to build Garrett Hack's small splay-legged table and you'll emerge with some solid new skills.

Building the Perfect Workshop

This round-up of sweet workshops is sure to inspire the wood rat in you.

Fine Woodworking on Martha Stewart

Fine Woodworking hits the road for an appearance on the Martha Stewart Show.

How to Make a Checkered Inlay

Learn a simple technique for inlay that will add a touch of class to your woodworking projects.

Dovetailed Cherry Cabinet

Cherry cabinet featuring dovetailed case and drawer with frame-and-panel door.

A Simple Way to Inlay Mother of Pearl

Furniture maker Craig Thibodeau takes a cue from the music world with his ingenious method for inlaying mother of pearl.

Does MDF Belong in Fine Furniture?

Is MDF ever appropriate for fine furniture? Find out what our editors think and sound off with your own advice.

Free Plan: Space Saving Tool Rack

Learn how to build an ingenious space-saving tool rack that compresses 32 sq. ft. of tool storage into manageable swinging panels.

The Go-to Book for Workbench Tech

Download a free chapter of Lon Schleining's seminal book on all things workbench.

Fast Fix: Sharpening Jig KeepsYour Stone Secure

Learn how to build a clever device for holding your waterstones secure in the latest episode of our Fast Fix video series.

It's Time to Crown Our Jig Champs

Find out who took home the top honors in our latest gallery challenge.

Vote for Your Favorite Woodworking Jig

Cast your vote for the winner of our latest gallery contest.

Open House at CT Valley School of Woodworking

If you're at all interested in woodworking, furniture making, woodturning, blacksmithing, or old tools, visit the 2010 open house.

Help Us Help You Sell Furniture

Fine Woodworking is teaming up with CustomMade.com to offer readers an easier route to selling their work, and we need your help!

Your Guide to the Coolest New Tools

Welcome to Tool Heaven: Our editors report live from the showroom floor of the 2010 International Woodworking Fair.

Help Wanted: In Search of an Associate Editor

We're in search of a new tool jockey journalist. Could it be you?

Play Against the Grain: The Wrong Way to Rip

Help prevent a common tablesaw accident in the latest edition of our online game. Plus, read one woodworker's story about "what went wrong."

IWF Alert: Lunch is on Us!

If you're visiting the International Woodworking Fair and have an appetite, read on to find out how to snag a free lunch with our editor.

Fast Fix: Avoid Snipe When Planing Short Boards

Learn how to slay the snipe dragon and surface short boards in a thickness planer.

How to Sharpen a Handplane Iron

Learn how to properly sharpen a plane iron by first flattening the back side of the iron before diving into the honing process.

Start Woodworking: Build a Hardwood Pizza Peel

Learn how to build a pizza peel from wood found in the scrap bin in this brand-new Start Woodworking project.

Weird Woodworking Tools

This tool kit from the biology lab fits right into my tool bag and works great for veneer repairs. The doctor is IN.

Fast Fix: Keep Your Router Bits Sharp and Safe

This nifty little storage unit will keep your router bits out of harm's way.

Start Woodworking: Edge Grain Cutting Board

Learn how to build an edge grain cutting board.

Tip-Top Tables Contest: We Have a Winner!

The votes are in. Now it's time to award a brand-new spray rig!

Vote for Our Next Contest Winner!

Cast your vote and help select the winner of our Tip-Top Tables contest.

Shop Tours with Fine Woodworking Staffers

We're touring the shops of Fine Woodworking editors and staffers.

A Call for Bloggers!

It's a call to arms as we gear up for a brand-new woodworking website!

Arts & Crafts Coffee Table

Arts & Crafts coffee table of white oak and wenge.

Fast Fix: Vise Insert Prevents Racking

Learn how to build a simple insert that will prevent wear-and-tear on your bench vise and offer a firmer grip to your workpieces.

Father's Day Gifts You Can Build

These four projects make great gifts and can be built in less than three days.

Fast Fix: Breadboard Ends Jig

Learn how to build and use a great jig for breadboard ends in the latest episode of Fast Fix

Make it Stick: A Guide to Glue Ups

When it comes to glue ups, there are about as many techniques available to us as there are trees in a forest.

Built-in Buildoff Update

As we near the finish line in our mudroom buildoff between woodworker and carpenter, the differences in working methods are becoming more and more apparent.

FW vs. FH Buildoff: And, We're Off!

Our big buildoff has officially begun. Be sure to tune in this Wednesday, February 17, for a live video podcast from the set!

How to Make Leaded Glass Windows

Learn how to make leaded glass windows by watching this step-by-step audio slideshow with Fine Woodworking art director Michael Pekovich.

FWW to Take on FHB in One Big Buildoff!

We're throwing down the gauntlet for a be-all, end-all buildoff between Fine Woodworking and Fine Homebuilding.

Making the King's Furniture

Join furniture maker Aaron Radelow on a journey through some of the most precise, intricate, and beautiful marquetry work you're every likely to see.

How to Cut Dovetail Keys on the Router Table

Fine Woodworking Senior Editor Tom McKenna tackles dovetail keys in the latest episode of our members-only Fast Fix video series.

Exploding Shellac: Finally, an Answer

We receive an answer as to the cause of gas buildup in old shellac cans.

Nakashima's Leg

The question of how to repair a broken chair leg takes on new meaning when it comes to super-fine furniture.

Building with Choke Cherry - Part II

Part II of an experiment in cutting, sawing, drying, and milling a not-so-common furniture wood.

Building with Choke Cherry

An experiment in sawing, drying, and working with a not-so-common workshop wood.

The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

Two reasons you should always check the date of manufacture when purchasing shellac.

Surface Prep Shootout: We Have a Winner!

Our first-ever live streaming event was a resounding success. See who took home the top spot!

Fine Homebuilding Kitchen Island Gallery Contest

Fine Homebuilding's latest gallery challenge is calling all woodworkers.

Brunch with Norm Abram

Old Sturbridge Village celebrates the opening of its latest exhibit with master carpenter Norm Abram.

What is this Tool?

Think you know your hand planes? The first reader to correctly identify this plane wins a free book.

Book Review: "Creating a Fine Art Entry Table"

For straightforward advice on how to build an inspiring entry table, Robert Ortiz comes to the rescue.

Know how to build a box? Enter this new challenge!

Epilog Laser teams up with WIRED magazine for a quirky new challenge inspired by director JJ Abrams.

Switchback Bookcase Wins Our Challenge

Dovetail joints and a whimsical design earned this bookcase a place at the top.

Sole Power Part II: How to Tune Up an Old Plane

This afternoon I headed back into the shop for Part II of my humble block plane's rehab. As you'll recall, yesterday was spent flattening the sole and sides of the plane, all of which were caked with...

Sole Power: How to Tune Up an Old Plane

Paint remnants, an uneven sole and years of oxidation make for one extensive rehab.

Tool Time in Vegas: AWFS 2009 Roundup

Keep tabs on the coolest new tool releases set to debut at this year's AWFS fair.

On the Road with Fine Woodworking

Mario Rodriguez's dovetail joinery, creative table stacking and life on the road.

Reinventing Nakashima's Straight Chair

Philadelphia University mounts exhibit on a master's original.

Bending Wood and Stretching Strings

How a piano is made - from forest floor to shop floor.

Splittin' Cane

The fine art of bamboo fly rod building.



Recent comments


Re: STL 65: Wicked Workshop Tips

Son of a gun - yup, I just confirmed it online--mercury in fluorescent tubes. You learn something new every day. Thanks folks.

Not surprising that I had no idea about this: you're talking to a guy who as a child discovered his dad's glass jar of mercury (he used it somehow in the grinding of his telescope mirrors). I recall pouring that stuff out on a table and having an enormous amount of fun pushing it around, separating it into separate globules, etc. My old man had no idea I'd discovered it. Possible brain damage I suppose!

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: STL 65: Wicked Workshop Tips

pcbg01207: You sir, are a genius! Those possibilities had never come to mind! I do have a young child so I think I might build a little locking box cover to keep curious hands away. Thanks for the great idea.

Best,
-Ed

Re: The Most Incredible Table You'll Ever See

The question I have for all of you is: would any of you ever attempt something this crazy? For my part, there is no way in hell I would have had the confidence to attempt it for a client, like this fellow did. Yet he completed it! I have an enormous amount of respect for anyone with that much self-confidence. It awes me! I guess I missed that gene! I still don't think any of my woodworking is "good enough." And maybe that's a good thing. Maybe that's what keeps a woodworker making better and better pieces - always striving for perfection and new challenges.

Cheers,
E

Re: Adventures in Banding

MDcustom: NICE EYES! Yeah, I realized the "sandwich error" once I began gluing up the sequences. But then I felt: "heck, it's still a repeating pattern, l'll keep it."

Funny enough, I spoke about this on the podcast we're releasing this Friday. It was featured in one of our regular segments on Shop Talk Live. Again NICE CATCH! I was wondering how long it would take for someone to notice:)

Cheers,
E

Re: Adventures in Banding

Yes Bob, I have seen your website in the past. In fact, I had been considering putting together a mashup of a variety of different methods for producing several different bandings from across the web.

However I do not appreciate the comment you've left here. In fact, that is putting it mildly. To echo your own comment: Libel is the act of defamation taking form in printed text. I do not appreciate having those sorts of statements leveled against me. Ever. Period.

That little crosscut sled for the bandsaw is one that I've had for quite some time. It is the most efficient way to cut banding material due to the narrow kerf size. That's why it's commonly used. Not just by yourself. Barber pole banding is not an uncommon variant of banding but rather, a pretty common one.

I will not allow anyone to defame me, other contributors to our blogs, or other folks leaving comments. Therefore, I am taking the offensive comments down.

However, I do feel there is valuable information for folks interested in banding on your site and I think folks should check it out. I'm leaving a link below.

In summation: while it is unfortunate that you felt the fact that our two methods being spot on similar was some sort of plagiarism, it does not grant you the right to make wild accusations. Again, I will not accept that when foisted upon myself, our anyone leaving comments in a blog post on this site.

That said - Bob's site has some pretty cool stuff on it and you can find it here: theapprenticeandthejourneyman.com/

Regards,
-Ed


Re: STL 63: The Micro-Sized Workshop

Hey woodrat: Not sure what you were referring to regarding audio - we didn't have a guest this week:)

Best,

Ed

And yes, 16x28!!! Pah!

Re: STL 60: Dumpster Diving for Terrific Tools

Archon,

Your comments concerning archaeology and Connecticut had me reflecting on this past weekend. My family and I found ourselves in a small park with trails through the woods. On one small hilltop with huge quartz deposits, one can still see all the quartz chips left behind my native Americans hundreds of years ago as they crafted axe blades, arrowheads and other tools. So incredible that all those stone chips from tools are still sitting there, where they were broken off by toolmakers of long ago.

Cheers,
Ed

Re: STL 60: Dumpster Diving for Terrific Tools

Jayhawker: Wow! reminds me of another find of mine in NYC. I listen to all my jazz and classical music on vinyl -- just sounds best in that format. Anyhow, walking back to my then-office after lunch I stumbled upon two big cardboard boxes completely packed with classical records - ALL shrink-wrapped and never opened. I couldn't manage both boxes but heaved one (probably weighted 100 pounds) atop my shoulder and muscled it the 4 blocks to my office. I'll never get over that find.
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: STL 60: Dumpster Diving for Terrific Tools

I love these stories. Here's another one:

Years ago, when I was living in NYC, I was on my way to a meeting - late as usual - when I walked past a fellow setting a 4 drawer filing cabinet - solid oak, hand dovetailed joinery - out on the curb. I had no time to pick it up, as I was on my way to a meeting. An hour later, that sucker was gone. Oh the agony!

Oh, and the wood stove in my house? A Scandia with a big beautiful brass key for the door? I scored that out of a barn. Just needed a cleaning and some new stove paint and she's good as new. I don't believe we (as a society) recycle as much as we should, or keep things around and maintain them as we should. Keep the stories coming!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Three great finishing tips

Hi ButchMacDonald,
Indeed you can see the scribe marks from the joinery. That's basically an aesthetic choice. many furniture makers actually leave these marks on their furniture. In my travels to the shops of many, many well known makers, I've found that it's a 50/50 thing. About half of folks leave the scribe lines intact, and about half don't.

As for your other comment: "are the dovetails on the wrong board?" -- This is the side of a dovetailed cabinet. I think you may have thought this was a drawer, perhaps?

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Router Accident is a Great Lesson in Climb Cutting

Lutro: Indeed, this is SUCH an easy mistake to make!!
CAHudson: Yes, I think some sort of video might be in order in the near future, again, simply because it's so easy to loose sight of the cutting mechanics in this situation. It's one of those things that, after you do it, you stand there for a moment and then shout to yourself: "DUH!"

Cheers all,

-Ed

Re: Arched-Top Whiskey Cabinet

saschafer: whether or not it's a "problem" depends upon your being a glass "half empty" or "half full" kind of guy. heh heh heh. Personally, I'd like to see a bottle of Lagavulin in this baby.
E

Re: STL 52: A Hit Man in the Workshop

dzj: Your comment cracked me up. I must admit to not having any rock and roll stories that involve the trashing of hotel rooms - we're woodworkers after all, not rock stars. ha ha ha. Well, guess we'll have to try harder next time around!
Cheers and thanks for listening.

Best,
Ed

Re: STL 52: A Hit Man in the Workshop

DWS11: THAT flea? I had no idea he was in any of the subsequent movies. Interesting. LOL
Cheers,
E

Re: Life, Death, and Sawdust

Yup, this was a very touching piece. It caught my eye because I'm in the process of designing an urn to house the cremains of my two grandparents - who are from Cuba. Right now I'm trying to figure out exactly how many board feet of Cuban mahogany I need to get my hands on. I'm thinking of building a beautiful mahogany box and then having a copper insert (box) that is brazed shut, witht the remains inside. That fits into the mahogany for a nice hermetic seal forever. We'll see. Yet another project I probably don't have time for, but it's an important one.

Anybody here ever braze copper? Is it relatively easy? Seems simple enough to me.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: STL 49: Power Tool Power

fiftyohm: Confused by your comment? Generally speaking, one wants to use a double pole 40 amp circuit. With 220 wiring - you have two hots and a ground, no neutral. Which seems like what you're saying. Who knows - I may have mis-spoken when I was balthering on.

Re: Flatten Wide Boards without a Big Jointer

For those wondering about the difference in appearance between the two faces of the board shown in the demo: this was a piece of scrap I happened upon which seemed to have been re-sawn at one point, rendering one side brighter looking than the other (exterior) side of the board. That's all.

Best,
Ed

Re: Flatten Wide Boards without a Big Jointer

nanomeister: VERY good point. Indeed, extending the rails will avert snipe! Cheers, E

Re: Flatten Wide Boards without a Big Jointer

Hi jlecomete:
Truth-be-told - it was super-fast and easy.

Cheers!
Ed

Re: My Not-So-Big-Workbench

Well done, Bryan! Your post just made my day. So happy you enjoyed the project. I'm still busy building my own Not-So-Big-Workbench's final home--converting my basement into a fully-operational shop that will do the little bench justice.

Cheers!
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 45: Taking the Fun Out of Fine Woodworking

dandegennaro: Oh, man - that was a baaaadddd punnnnn! LOL

Anyhow, there's always room for construction criticism on the show - but that doesn't mean we won't have a little fun at the critic's (as well as our OWN) expense;)

Cheers all,

-Ed

Re: Hand Tools Reinvented

Hi everyone - Abiel doesn't have a website however, I did ask him if folks could approach him via Facebook if they were interested in purchasing some of his tools - he responded in the affirmative.

Re: Shop Talk Live 41: Ask a Rocket Scientist

Vespid's Offerman comment just made me snort coffee out my nose -- I laughed so hard. Well put, sir. Well put.

Re: Shop Talk Live 41: Ask a Rocket Scientist

Hi Brint: Unfortunately, we do not offer transcripts of the show.

Best,

Ed

Re: just started wood working

Very well done, indeed!!!

Re: Not So Big Work Bench Country Style

Nice!!!

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

Hi 2Paul:

the question in my mind is: at what time of year did you build the vanity. If the 1/16-in. gap was sufficient, I'd be willing to wager you built it in the summer.

I would be very curious to find out.

Best,

-Ed

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

Oh, and someone asked about the "schmootz" on the clear plastic window of the meter's needle assembly. It's some sort of glue that was used to, well, glue something to the window at some point--sort of "rubbery" in nature. I've been peeling it off bit-by-bit. Haven't the foggiest idea what the heck that could have been!

E

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

There's some debate here in the comments as to whether or not 16% is really a necessary number for the "worst case scenario. In fact, I had that very same debate with one of my colleagues here at FWW who felt it might be a bit high. For most folks, who don't plan to ship a piece from, say, New England to the tropics--16% probably would be a touch high. At the end of the day, folks will need to select a worst-case number they feel comfertabale with. Myself? I'm thinking of tacking up a few scraps of various wood species to my basement shop's wall. My basement has more moisture than the living spaces above. I'll be measuring that moisture change from month-to-month throughout a 12 month cycle to see what my specific conditions are like here in New England. I must say however that Chris Becksvoort mentioned to me during FWW LIve that he has NEVER had a call-back about an expansion/contraction related problem on any furniture he's ever built. That said, those of you who worry about 1/8-in. gaps - yeah, that's certainly a valid point. Anyhow, I'm glad I decided to veer towards using a touch of science in my woodworking. It just makes sense!

Best,
Ed

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

I've got to say however, that I do love doing the math. There's something very satisfying about consulting the meter, the tables, and doing the multiplication. I'm really geeking out with this thing.

Re: Calculating for Wood Movement

Thanks, GarageWoodworks!

Re: Fine Woodworking Live Holds its First Build-Off

ha ha ha - LOVE it, AJV:) I had the same thought - it is remarkably difficult to design something and get the proportions right - without putting real solid thought into it - something which is pretty much impossible to do in 90 minutes!

Ed

Re: AWFS: New Veritas plane for shooters

Mickey: Yes, it will be available in left-handed models as well. They'll be releasing the right handed model first, following up with the one for lefty use about a month later if my memory serves.
-E

Re: Shop Talk Live 36: Definitely a Dovetail Disaster

JPS: VERY good point about cleaning the surface between grits!

JKC: Getting ready to do the surgery on the garage door soon. Don't wory, I DO plan on replacing the beam! And then I've got to turn my attention to my attic: lifting up the floor boards, putting down new insulation, and then plywood sub floor. So I'll have LOTS of those old floor boards to play with. May have to show up at FWW with a truck full of wood!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Fight Physics with Lapped Dovetails

Tim: NICE point!!
Cheers,

Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 34: Bandsaw Master Michael Fortune

Thanks for listening, Chuck! I'm a big fan of the beeswax/mineral oil finish for my cutting boards. Looks beautiful and clear (no yellowy tint) and it's easy to apply additional coats in the future as the finish wears.

Matt's jointer is safe and sound in its new home and I can't wait to see it at my next video shoot with him!

Best,

Ed

Re: Turning Tools on the Cheap

Clewes is fantastic. I shot a few videos with him for FWW.com. Brilliant artist/technician and a stand-up guy.

Re: 3 questions with Phil Lowe

Folks, that's the wonderful thing about a craft like woodworking. There's more than one way to get any job done, plenty of differing opinions, and lots of opportunities for brilliant debate: case in point!
Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Meet an 11-Year-Old Woodworking Wiz

jrich6024 - indeed it is. I only wish I had been able to pull that off at the age of 11 - not that I didn't try!

Cheers,
Ed

Re: A Nutty Alternative to SawStop Technology

joefree77: That is NOT a job I think I could handle (cleaning up the "detritus" left behind. Yikes!
Best,
-Ed

Re: Add an Inlaid Signature to Your Work

ctsjr82: Indeed, it was a little difficult to control the dremel with the base as well as I had hoped. The solution I think will come with building a wide, flat base - maybe out of Lexan- and then making an even shallower cut so that the bit just sales through the stock. Still, I'm fairly happy with the result.
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 28: Shocking Confession from a Fine Woodworking Staffer

62vetteefp: It's OK to step away from the Unifence. LOL. Glad you're ok with the choice!

-Ed

Re: Add an Inlaid Signature to Your Work

Thanks, Pickingrin1!

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Add an Inlaid Signature to Your Work

Thanks, jdm92562 for writing: I believe my next step will be to build a custom base for my dremel - complete with hand-holds that will make it easier to control the cutting. I also plan on making the cut (next time) even shallower than this one - so that the bit doesn't bog down and wander as much. This experiment was shallow but I can get even shallower, I'm sure!
Best,
Ed

Re: A Nutty Alternative to SawStop Technology

Matt:
Has anyone used the term "geek" before when speaking about you? LOL

Re: Eight Tips for Securing Work to a Benchtop

Kingbird: I'm glad this information was helpful to you. Thanks for you comment.
Best,
Ed

Re: Eight Tips for Securing Work to a Benchtop

theoffcut: Indeed the traditional stop is more often used for panels and such. Just happened to be a photo I had on-hand.
Best,
Ed

PS: I'm going to continue adding a few more suggestions to this post over the course of the next few days - beginning with a "hold-fast" - working on that now. That is an awesome little device!

E

Re: Plane Irons and Chisels Need a Flat, Polished Back

Beence: Awesome information. Thanks for posting that tip!
Ed

Re: Like a Kid in a Candy Shop

Hi guys,

Thanks for your comments. I must say that I truly enjoyed the camaraderie that's always present in Phil's shop. And as I said in the post, all of the wonderful carvings, joinery examples, patterns, and other bric-a-brac on his shop walls is just a sheer joy to go through.
Best,
-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 26: Workbench Glue-Up Conundrum

Hi folks,
Lots of great comments here. I thought I'd chime in on a couple of them. Regarding sound effects - I'm happy with the decision we made to get rid of them. While music or sound works well for segment intros, I too felt it was a bit much when they were peppered all over the place (although I still admit it was fun to play around with them - heh heh heh).

As far as live calls are concerned - I'm on the fence - I could go either way. That said, I feel as though we've got to take things one step at a time. Right now, the ability to have questions sent in via email is a boon to us. It allows us to go over the questions ahead of time in order to really craft a robust response--that's tough to do 100% on the fly. By reviewing the questions ahead of time, we're able to craft a well-edited answer that gets to the point quickly.

Anyhow, this podcast is now officially my favorite part of the "job" here at FWW. I love the interaction with folks who read the magazine/use the site, am constantly being challenged with questions, and just love hearing the final polished product when it goes out into the airwaves every other Friday. Many thanks for your continued support - seriously!

Best to all,
-Ed Pirnik

Re: Shop Talk Live 23: Cuba's Forgotten Furniture Masterpieces

BLASMALDO: I'm no wood science expert so take what I say with a grain of salt. That said, the references I've found to "Caoba Centenraia" all seem to point to the Dominican Republic. At the end of the day, the wood species Swietenia mahogani grows all over the Caribbean, so I think one would be hard pressed to be able to figure out country of origin unless they could really trace a piece back to it's maker.

Re: Shop Talk Live 23: Cuba's Forgotten Furniture Masterpieces

InNJ: Very interesting. At the time that my mother and grandparents left Cuba, they had my uncle go into their home (the one my mother is pictured standing in front of) to retrieve as much furniture as they could. Many of those old rococo antiques are still in my aunt and uncle's bedrooms. Unfortunately, the finishes have suffered greatly over the years, but it was fun to see mom's reaction to coming across all the old pieces that were in her bedroom as a kid. Cheers,
Ed

Re: FineWoodworking.com Gets a Makeover

Hi Chris:
That slowness you describe is pretty normal. Since the site is brand new in every sense of the word, it's going to take some time for your machine to cache everything. I believe there is also some back-end caching that goes on - on our end as well (servers and such). The site should become faster and faster over the course of the next week - I am told.
Best,
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 20: Fine Woodworking on Primetime TV

james: I love that bench. I've had it for about six months now and wouldn't change a thing--except for the fact that it currently resides in my parents' basement as my wife and I are still searching for a home to settle in. So dad gets a good bench to piddle around on - FOR NOW!!!!! If I can answer any questions regarding construction of that bench - don't hesitate to send them my way. Best - Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 20: Fine Woodworking on Primetime TV

james3one: Technically, you are correct. That said, there were a couple of reasons I choose to go long in this case: 1) Those splines are only about 3/8-in. wide. You'd be very hard-pressed to snap one along the long grain at that narrow width. 2) These boxes were constructed by laying the four box sides flat, taping them together and then rolling the entire thing into a box - after that was done, splines where tapped into place from the outside of the box. If I had gone with short grain, I would have been guaranteed a bunch of spots in those short grain pieces splitting part as I sent the splines "home." 3) by including a back on those drawer boxes that is glued and pin nailed into a rabbet, I created a super strong box that wouldn't provide for much racking stress on those splines. In some ways, the splines are there for alignment just as much as for some added strength. At the end of the day, I got some absurdly strong boxes out of the deal. They've been moved around, screwed/unscrewed many times (from the bench's open well) and one was even dropped - no problems to report. Oh, and sorry for having misunderstood your question. Glad you wrote in to clarify!
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 17: Behind-the-Scenes at Lee Valley Tools

rorynidaho: Not sure what you are referring to. This is the biweekly podcast, not a video series. Sorry for any confusion.
Best,

-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 17: Behind-the-Scenes at Lee Valley Tools

berferdt: not gonna tell you what the sound in the podcast is or isn't but if it were a sawstop - it'd be there simply because it's a cool sound.

Cheers,

E

Re: Shop Talk Live 16: A Lethal Dose of PEG?

Thanks Thognar!

Your note of support has been logged! LOL
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 15: Curvy Cabinet Conundrum

Antondeg: You don't need iTunes to listen to the podcast. Just click on the red "Listen to the Podcast" link and you can stream it right through the browser.
Best,
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 14: Who Needs Half-Blind Dovetails?

sdbranam: To your point about techniques - "But clearing the waste was the same: chisel down across the grain, then in from the end to pop a chip, repeatedly" - That's exactly how I was I taught to cut dovetails at RIT many years ago, by a fellow named Rich Tannen - who is still there, I believe. Simple and effective. Thanks for listening.
-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 12: Special Guest Nick Offerman

Hey folks,

Sorry about the delay on the streaming link. I had a two hour drive back from FW Live - arrived home to find a sick baby that pretty much kept us up all night. Ugh.

Anyhow, enjoy the show!!!

Best,

-Ed

Re: Hawaiian Steel Guitar Project - Part 2

Pah! And when would he have time to actually build the darn thing??? Just kidding. Always a pleasure, saschafer:)
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 11: That Sinking Feeling

saschafer: Yes, Furniture & Cabinetmaking is a wonderful magazine. We have a subscription here at the office. They put together a wonderful mag!

Best,

-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 11: That Sinking Feeling

Hi folks,

Thanks for the heads-up on the link. Not sure why it was doing that. Anyhow, it's fixed.

Also: "The Beard for No Good Reason:" That's priceless. Actually, I was in such a rush to finish getting the episode up on Friday afternoon that I had a heck of a time titling it. I WISH I had gone that route!

Best to all - and a special thanks to the kind folks who responded to my blog at LJ's for their questions and comments.

-Ed

Re: Neckties and Tablesaws Just Don't Mix

CaseyO: HAH! Good question:) I think I'll take your advice. I have a workbench to finish building:)

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Neckties and Tablesaws Just Don't Mix

I hear ya, saschafer - but I still thought it was hilarious. We'll have to agree to disagree on this one.
No harm, no foul though - you raise a perfectly good point.
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Intermediate Workbench Video Series

ChrisGlennie: The duluth aprons are super sweet (although more expensive) than this one. This one is manufactured by BucketBoss. I like it a lot although I will say that the adjustments on the back, where you cinch it down to fit you properly, aren't the greatest. The nylon webbing tends to get pinched and twisted in the metal guides you slide them through. That's my only complaint.

Re: Intermediate Workbench Video Series

Bob Fenneman: have a look at dead squirrel's comment. He's got the right idea. You'll just need to add some leveling feet on two of the foot pads that support your bench's trestle end assemblies.

Cheers and thanks much for the kind words.
Best,
Ed

Re: Intermediate Workbench Video Series

Hah! Thanks guys, I truly do appreciate those kind words on the bench AND the podcast!

Cheers to you both.

Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 8: Just a Splash of Water

I hear you, guys. I enjoyed the video version and always felt like the white board we used was an awesome tool. Trouble is, it took a great deal of effort to handle those livestreaming events. Then getting the taped footage encoded for upload to the blog posts within a couple of days was also a good deal of work.

At the end of the day, the ROI was just so low, we couldn't justify keeping the video stream going. The number of folks who used the video stream as opposed to the audio version was just way too small.

Best to all,

-Ed

Re: What I've Learned About the Online Woodworking Community

Hey no fair beem! I zapped the sound drops myself! Haven't been using 'em for two episodes now!
LOL
Only thing you'll ever here is the drops for segment intros - that's it!

Cheers

E

Re: What I've Learned About the Online Woodworking Community

beem - you don't want to see me - I'm hideously ugly. LOL

I don't know, I like my "disembodied" nature on the podcast.

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Gearing Up for a Workbench Video Workshop Series

Hi Ron:

Argh! I would if I could, my friend. Trouble is, as we film these video workshops, often-times there are details that change midway through filming (happens organically). Because of that, we wait till the end of filming to check all the measurements and begin the plan production process - meaning, you've got to wait till it comes out around the same time as the video.

My latest problem is that the bench project, and work I'm doing right now on another Video Workshop project with Mike Pekovich (tool cabinet) has inspired me to build a "Tool Cabinet." My wife's response when I told her: "sigh, and where are you going to put that?"

We're looking for houses at the moment so all my woodworking gear is being stored - as will this bench and that future tool cabinet. I'm a sick, sick man. LOL

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Gearing Up for a Workbench Video Workshop Series

ejc: Nice! You should be able to find a decent deal on a cast iron vise. For about $100, you ought to be well-outfitted!

I assume the "borg" is a big box store? Never heard anyone refer to them in that manner before - that's hilarious!

Still....please don't get "assimilated."

Cheers,

-E

Re: Gearing Up for a Workbench Video Workshop Series

ctsr: Beech is an awesome choice, and one that I considered. I very nearly built the base out of that species. Not only is it reasonably priced, but quite frankly, it's got a really interesting grain to it!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 5: Compounding Errors

Hi nslewis:
Indeed - "oil-based lacquer" was a slip of the tongue. As you state: an impossible formulation! It was actually a lacquer-based sealer, which is-or was at least, the industry standard for doing polyurethane over raw wood.

Also, you raised some great points/food for thought. There is most certainly a sort of "crowd-sourced" editing of less-than-stellar content that does go on in the online world. Good point!

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 4: Dueling Cabinets

VegasRichard: Thanks for the kind words. It's tough to do a walking tour of the shop, because we have the camera on a tripod, with a great deal of wires all over the place. That said, we might be able to swing around so you can see the machine room (behind camera), and a couple of other tidbits. Can't promise a monster shop tour but we might be able to give a glimpse. I'll see what I can do.
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 4: Dueling Cabinets

whiskey3 and redstickslim: Thanks so much for your kind words. There is a great deal of effort put into these biweekly events and it makes our day when folks get a lot of use and fun out the work we put in. Cheers to you both.
-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 4: Dueling Cabinets

Thanks very much, beem!

Re: Video Sneak-Peek of New Groundbreaking Video Workshop Series

Thanks for the kind words everyone. This was a blast to shoot, and Greg really ran with it! For the record, we are not chucking pocket-screws under the bus. They make very fast, strong joints, where appropriate. In fact, Greg owns the Kreg pocket-screw jig in the video, and uses it all the time.
Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Nick Offerman: Woodworker and Actor

This is great! I'm posting it onto Offerman Woodshop's Facebook wall. I'm pretty sure he'll appreciate seeing his design built by someone else - and in action!

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Nick Offerman: Woodworker and Actor

stewdes: That's fantastic. Can you post a photo of the rig into our Jigs gallery?

Otherwise, you should absolutely post a photo to the Offerman Woodshop Facebook page!

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Shop Talk Live 1: The Big Debut

Dear beem:

Thanks very much for your kind words. Indeed, we noticed that issue with Asa's mic as well. The gremlin was tracked down and we look forward to episode two (should roll out on Friday, March 16 - we'll have that nailed down by that time.
These initial beta events are always finicky the first time around. I'm also glad you found that white board helpful. we weren't sure if it would pay off or not, but I too feel that it really helped Mike to get some good points across.

Best to you,
-Ed

Re: Play Against the Grain: One Lazy Latheman

Ha ha - Nah - lathe is spinning in the correct direction. That said, I could see why you might think otherwise - with the big Powermatic log facing the viewer.

Robscaffe: Lighten up. It's still a serious magazine, but ya just gotta be able to have some mindless fun once in a while:)

Cheers all.

-Ed

Re: Why do you work wood?

For me, it is at least in part, a response to a modern society driven more-and-more by experiencing life from within a virtual world-as opposed to a more tactile experience of life.

Very few people have the know-how to change their car's oil or replace their brake pads nowadays. How many folks do you know who can fix a leaky copper pipe or know how to navigate with a map and compass?

These sorts of talents/abilities are becoming more and more rare. And I'd say that is in large part to the way in which society has migrated from one in which folks largely "did things for themselves" to one in which we're more comfortable pretending to experience life throug the internet as opposed to getting our hands dirty and "doing" something. This sounds strange coming from a "web producer," I know, but it's a big part of the reason I enjoy building furntiure. I want to "do it myslef." There is a sense of victory that comes at the culmination of every project--a feeling that continues throughout life, every time you open the door of the cabinet you built or the drawer of the desk you assembled years before, you're feeling just a bit of that victory.

Re: Duncan Phyfe: Master Cabinetmaker

Hey Dennis,

I'm not familiar with Linke but did have the pleasure of going through a great deal of information about Lannuier while working on this slideshow. Hirschl & Adler also has pieces by this maker on display as well.
Will have to Google Linke today.

Cheers!

-Ed

Re: UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

Thanks guys:)
E

Re: Tweaking a shaker table

Bravo, Ken!
Best,
-Ed

Re: Duncan Phyfe: Master Cabinetmaker

Hi outdated: I believe you may have mis-heard what was stated in the slideshow: What Miss Feld speaks of is the fact that Phyfe does not appear to have been trained at all before his arrival in the United States, nor did he come from a cabinetmaking family or background. Mere statement of fact. Cheers, -Ed

Re: Duncan Phyfe: Master Cabinetmaker

SFGaloot, rburwell, and vance: Many thanks. The Hirschl & Adler exhibit is closing soon, do try and catch it!

outdated: Not sure what you are referring to in your response. Did you actually watch the slideshow?

Best,
-Ed

Re: UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

Hi folks,

Just took the clamps and cauls off the box lid. A perfect repair! I'll update the post with a few photos I snapped on my iPhone, later this week.

Many thanks for all your suggestions - they were spot on! Especially the one about the inverted, elongated "V" by stevefell.

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

The tip about cutting out the patch area like an inverted, elongated "V" in order to go with the grain, is a very good one. Thanks.

I am still considering doing a burn in, but if I do go with the "glue-in" route, I'll be attempting the "V" repair.

EXCELLENT points all around. Thank you very much.

Best,
-Ed

Re: UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

OOOO - even better. I've got a marking knife I could hone up a bit - beveled on only one side. I'll just need to make the tool rest a bit thinner- to that the knife's handle doesn't hit the rest and prevent the blade from penetrating as far into the lid as I need to go.

Good thoughts!

-Ed

Re: UPDATED: Help a Fine Woodworker Solve a Veneer Problem

saschafer: Damn You!!!

hammertime8: Yeah, that's the idea I'm shooting for - going a bit beyond the actual damage. I think the toughest part is going to be paring out the waste, keeping away from the base wood as much as possible. THAT is going to require an incredibly delicate touch. Thanks for the input!
Best,
Ed

Re: Repairing a Checked Tabletop

saschafer: I'm just glad I caught it when I did. better now than 6 months down the road when my computer is sitting atop it in the living room!
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Repairing a Checked Tabletop

cirelloman:

My theory has to do with the finishing process.

On the day I began to apply finish, I applied the first coat on the underside and allowed to dry overnight. The crack emerged overnight so I'm left to surmise that in the interim time between application of finish on the other side of the table, the top experienced uneven moisture absorption from tha air, allowing from some movement. Just my guess. That's why I'm always in a rush when applying finish to a top - I like to get it on as quickly as possible, and secure the top to the table via buttons, also as quickly as possible.

Best,
Ed

Re: Repairing a Checked Tabletop

Fiveoaks: I should have perhaps added that if I'd wanted to make the crack invisible, I might have opted to tint the CA glue with some powdered dye. But again, I didn't really mind the visible hair line - I juste wanted it to be smooth to the touch. The tabletop is finally finished (put the last coats on today) and I'm quite pleased with the result. The spline can barely be seen - you really have to know it's there to find it.

Oh, and concerning the syringe - there is one caveat - I found that the small spring in the syringe blew out after squirting the gel into the crack. By the time I was finished, the spring and syringe tip gave up the ghost - to much pressure (remember, these syringes are designed for liquids, not gels) - so be careful. As for the vacuum trick - yes, I've known folks to use that method as well, to good effect.

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Repairing a Checked Tabletop

JMeeley: Absolutely could have done a breadboard end but at the end of the day, I just didn't want BB's breaking up the expanse of the tabletop. So I opted for this method.

byhammerandhand: Interesting! I've never been able to get a hold of them here in Connecticut. That's good to know.

Best,
-Ed

Re: Self-Centering Mortising Base for the Router

LOVE this idea! Thanks TimR!!

I've also wanted to experiment with doing offset mortises by placing one of the pins closer to the bit. In theory, I think it should work - haven't tried it yet, though.

Thanks for the great idea.
Best,
Ed

Re: When Good Glue Goes Bad

Hi swenson: Reason you can't see your glueline is due to the species of wood. The color of cherry is much closer - or complimentary - to that of the Titebond III. Doesn't matter how perfect a joint it is - this one was handplaned to a perfectly flat fit - that dark glue on such a bright white colored wood species 'll kill ya every time.

Best,
Ed

Re: Enter to win a wooden kayak kit from Pygmy Boats

TopspinD - be sure to click on the link in the post to go to Pygmy's site to sign up.
Best,
Ed

Re: Perfect Bevels on a Bench Grinder

thedude50: saschafer is correct - this technique is just for grinding the bevel - not for honing.

I must say, I still prefer the Tormek - it's nearly brainless when used with the guide - but with a new baby and all the expenses that go along with that - I'll be sticking to a conventional grinder for the time-being (in my home shop at least!).
Best to you,
-Ed

Re: Shaker Lap Desk in SketchUp

Mr_Sully: The link is now operational. Sorry about that!
Best,
-Ed

Re: Video Workshops: This is how we do it

I smell a bribe, Kenney.

Re: Video Workshops: This is how we do it

Thanks NikonD80: I'll never grow up. I refuse! As for the router table, I've kept in touch with Matt (we share a "cube" wall here at the office) regarding how he's liked using his new unit - loves it. He's been very happy with the final product. I got to play around with it as well - and with that mapel support structure - it is REALLY rigid, flat and tough. Now I need to find the cash to buy the old router he replaced with the unit in this one - used!
Cheers,
Ed

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

It seems to have been successful. Been a couple of weeks now and none of the pieces I baked have shown even the slightest signs of weeping. Phew!

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

james3one: Funny you should mention that. A couple of us were talking about that very same idea in the shop about three days ago - great minds:)
Best,
Ed

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

OtherPeoplesTrash: I often use olive oil to help dissolve bits of oil-based poly from my hands. Works like a charm!

Best,
Ed

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

johnny p: absolutely - it just depends as to whether or not you mind having to go through the re-sharpening and honing process. It didn't bother me at all.
Best,
Ed

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

elkhaircaddis: You are correct - at least I think you are! I allowed those mineral spirits to dry out of the board for a good few days before I baked them. Good point!

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

NHAccents: That is wild! You're saying that 160+ yearl-old lumber is still weeping?! WOW! Just goes to show, you can't stop Mother Nature!

I had spoken with one of my colleagues about the possibility of setting the sap in longer front/rear aprons. Luckily, I was able to find two boards that were just fine as-is but, we came up with the idea of potentially taping together a mini-oven using foil-coated rigid foam insulation and placing a heat lamp inside. I haven't done the experimentation yet to see what kind of temperature I could achieve in such a rig and if I were to do it, I would most likely do it outdoors - just in case. I don't think ignition would be a possibility but I'm no engineer and wouldn't want to mess around! So: perhaps building a long oven sized to just fit the components you desire and placing a heat lamp or two inside might be in order? My two cents.
Best,
Ed

Re: How to Set Wood Sap

jdgoodwin: Thanks for the tips! Keep 'em coming folks - this is a great little topic for anyone who has ever been handed this sort of a headache.

Re: Appeals court upholds Osorio tablesaw verdict: Feds consider landmark safety standard

I wanted to chime in here, since I worked with Asa to get this post edited and published in a timely manner.
There is absolutely no disagreement here as to the phenomenal nature of the SawStop. It's a great product - that's why we have one in our own shop at FWW. That said, we all felt that certain issues were being glossed over by the CPSC. There is very little understanding as to other potential dangers with tablesaws. Also (I can't speak for Asa on this but these are my two cents) - what bugs me more than anything about the Osorio case is the simple fact that it speaks volumes about modern society. Where did the idea of taking responsibility for one's own actions go? That said, Osorio didn't bring the suit himself, but I do feel as though perhaps the court didn't quite understand the fact that Osorio had taken all the safety devices off of his saw, and was working in a state of complete ignorance - ever do a freehand rip? Sheesh.
Ed

Re: Birth Interrupts FWW Video Shoot

Thanks again.
Indeed, I had read that little tidbit about her name. Incidentally, her middle name is "Carli" - an homage to two of my favorite cousins in Cuba (where my mother is from and where I visit family from time-to-time). Now I've just got to work on making her bilingual! A good skill nowadays, to be sure.
But that still leaves me wanting to head back up to Garrett's in the near future. I learned more in that one day watching Garrett work (about woodworking) than all the reading I've done on the subject over the years. It's wonderful to watch a skilled craftsman/woman go at their craft with such skill!

Best,
-Ed

Re: Birth Interrupts FWW Video Shoot

Thanks NikonD80! My daughter is going to have a great birth story when she's a bit older!

Re: Routing grooves in curved drawers, part 2

Gentlemen, gentlemen, gentlemen: Don't you know that "reciPIE" is plural for "reciPE?" DDUUUHHHHHH!!!!!
Just kidding:)

-Ed

Re: Get Ready to Cut Some D'uhvetails

Moontoad - that is AWESOME! Keep 'em coming in the comments section. When I make round two - I'll add a whole wack of 'em!

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Get Ready to Cut Some D'uhvetails

Hey guys,

we've got another full page of more, and will be adding and tweaking this thing. Maybe I WILL make a downloadable version. Why not, right?

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: A New Home for Mouth-Watering Marquetry

1stwoodstone_man: That's a fantastic point. Thanks for bringing it up. Kim: No problem - I've been getting more and more interested in the craft since I began constructing humidors. The creative possibilities are endless when it comes to inlay and I would love to see Inlay Arts present some approachable methods that some folks might try out!
Best,
Ed

Re: The Easiest Finish Ever

Thanks, Gina. And welcome back:)

E

Re: AWFS Tool News: Rockler Releases Router Table for Trim Routers

Tony: Indeed that would be pointless. That's why the photo enlarges from 200 pixels in width to 430 pixels in width.

-E

Re: Framing Franklin

Hey jminiard: A fair point. It would have been nice to have had more gold leaf photos. Fact is, we worked with the photos that were taken at the time of the frame's construction-photos graciously provided to us by Roger and Judy. And hey - did you remember to turn off your A/C the times you've tried gilding? LOL
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Stupefying Engineering in an 18th Century Table

andybarss: Actually, it does mean exactly what I intended:
"to overwhelm with amazement; astound; astonish"

LOL
Cheers,

Ed

Re: Stupefying Engineering in an 18th Century Table

scootsp8: Exactly. I'd certainly classify this little table's engineering elements as absolutely stupifying.

-E

Re: Seeking more sustainable practices? Follow furnituremaker John Wiggers

I gotta say - this is a fantastic debate! More! More! I feel as though I'm geeking out on furniture design!! Cheers all - and quite frankly- cheers on a super-interesting furniture design.
-Ed

Re: Father's Day Must-Have Woodworking Gifts

Claytonwood: Nothing beats a solid combination square - especially after you've been fooling around with a lesser square that can be so inaccurate, it's infuriating! I love mine!

Kingmanson - I need to let Matt know that Woodcraft has 'em in stock!

Re: UPDATE Caption contest: Win a CommandMax Sprayer

I know I can't compete - as a member of the staff - but I needed to add my caption:
"Don't worry, baby, that Festool sander is just temporary...just temporary....daddy still loves you."

Re: Antiqued Credenza-Style Entertainment Center

Thanks very much, foxrocks!
Ed

Re: What is Furniture Lab?

I must say, it's refreshing for us to be able to let our "hair down," break the conventional furniture making rules and essentially do whatever we please, without worrying about conventional furniture design trends and pleasing a specific audience. Furniture Lab serves to allow folks to really experiment - and quite frankly, repurposing materials just makes so much sense to me, what with all the bric-a-brac just laying around being unused nowadays.

Ed

Re: Design journal: Let the function drive the design

This is an awesome design! Simple, yet very, very elegant. Well done - as always:)
E

Re: Furniture Lab: Recycling Found Objects into Fine Furniture

'twas a veritable playground of neat, weird, oddball "stuff." You name it, it was probably there. That Toledo scale was one of the coolest things that caught my eye. Don't know why on Earth I'd want one in my living room but I do - really, I do. My wife (rightfully so) doesn't understand me:)

Ed

Re: Lamello's Zeta is a Knockout Tool for Knock-Down Furniture

Heck no -but what an ingenious little device! Wish I had one just to horse around with! Cheers, Ed

Re: Skil Revamps Router Line

Valid point there, Dreamcatcher.

I'm really curious to see how this new line pans out. Waiting to see one in the flesh once we get a model in to test out.
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Death at Yale University a Sad Reminder for Shop Safety Vigilance

Heck, just using a dull tool on the lathe is enough to scare the pants off me. Catch it on your spinning stock in just the right way and you have a recipe for disaster.

This just didn't need to happen.

-Ed

Re: Recycled Materials Make for One Great Budget Workbench

Hi John_Moran,

As far as I know - the ability for images that are in the gallery sectino at the top of posts to appear in "print-to-PDF" has never been available. In-line images - or images that appear within the body text-- do appear, however, this post only has gallery images.
Best,
Ed

Re: Could This Tool Change Everything?

maxfrustation: I'd say Mike P. is one of the hardest working guys in this office!

Ed

Re: Could This Tool Change Everything?

Dear songbirdfeeder:
The video actually went up at 8:30am on April 1, 2011 - check the date. Our eletters however, go out on Tuesday's - so you may not have seen it on the site until just now.
Cheers,
Ed

PS: Glad you folks got a good laugh! Wow, was that ever fun to produce. Wish we could do these more often!

Re: Recycled Materials Make for One Great Budget Workbench

Hi John_Moran: sounds like you need to update your Adobe Acrobat. Just checked the PDF files - and all load and print as they should.

Best,
Ed

Re: FWW Introduces New iPad Woodworking Apps

There's a lot of good food for thought here, folks. Thanks for the comments!

Best,
Ed

Re: Could This Tool Change Everything?

Thanks guys - glad you got the JOKE. LOL

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

finefinefinewood: Have you seen the FW issues from pre-1995? Talk about facial hair! Woah!

Re: Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

Hey finefinewood: WHAT ABOUT PLAID!!???? LOL

Re: Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

saschafer:
I just noticed you pointed folks to the Flash update. Thanks for pitching in - it's much appreciated.
Best,
Ed

Re: Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

Congratulations Texaswoodturner - you've got the book!
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Against the Grain: Bone-Headed Bandsawing

Hi folks,

Anyone having issues with the game not playing in a particular browser should update their Flash player. It's actually a Flash update that is required.
Cheers,
Ed

Re: The Faces of FineWoodworking.com

brandy20 and Woodsmithy: Thank you very much for your kinds words. It takes a great deal of effort to keep this site up-to-date and functioning as it should, and your remarks are truly appreciated.

Best,
Ed

Re: Free Chapter Download: Vacuum Press Basics

Hi again folks.

You should be all set now. Enjoy!

Ed

Re: Free Chapter Download: Vacuum Press Basics

Thanks for the heads-up folks. I'm working on this technical error as we speak. Should have the download working very shortly.

Thanks much and sorry for the hassle.

Best,

Ed

Re: Make Your Own Leather Chisel Roll

Superb work, as always, John! And please, don't come to work in leather pants - it's a wee bit odd in my humble opinion. LOL

Re: Homemade Slot Mortiser Has all the Right Moves

Hey Steve: I hear ya. In fact, that's what's so fantastic about the website. I can do so many things on here that I can't necessarily do in print. Opens up a LOT of other avenues for woodworkers. When I was in college (RIT) I took several classes at the School for American Crafts. They had an awesome horizontal mortising machine that was so fun to use. I've always wanted to build a rig like this but fear the project - the intricacies of all the moving parts would take me forever to execute properly. Perhaps the coolest aspect of this guy's rig is the fact that he can move on two axes with the same handle. Just awesome!
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Winners Announced: You Want What Contest

Wixom:
Let me see what I can do. Perhaps these folks have a couple of photos (G-rated, please) they could share.
Best,
Ed

Re: Tablesaw Safety Goes Under the Microscope--Again

BStev,

I have read that Gass' original intent was not to build and sell safer tablesaws but rather, to pioneer and license the technology. That has always been my understanding and I can't help but sense that's what may be on the horizon. Who knows . . .
Ed

Re: Building the Perfect Workshop

pkorman1: You're not alone. I could also use a space not just dedicated to woodworking, but perhaps for building R/C planes for my nephew (love that), a separate space for my wife's oil painting hobby. . . . the list goes on and on. It's tough being a fan so many different hobbies.

Re: Cutlists are a waste of space

There's a great lesson here that rang a loud bell in my head when I read this post.

The bottom line is, one can't be a slave to a cut list. I can recall building one of my first projects from a plan and pre-cutting every component and piece of joinery to the exact dimensions of the cut list - then attempting to assemble the piece. Big mistake. Lots of my joinery failed to line up properly. One needs to "mark from reality" and not necessarily from a measured cut list.

I think the cut list is effective at the beginning of a project, when you're trying to figure out how much lumber you need, rough parts sizes, etc - but when it comes time to really craft joinery and assemble parts, a cut list can get you into a whole lot of trouble.

Some excellent points here.

Cheers!

-Ed

Re: How to Turn a Basic Bowl

pscott - you are correct - Kelly used a hold-down on the miter saw. EXCELLENT tip.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Winner Announced: Help Crown a Dovetail King!

snowbelt3: I'm a Lagavoulin man, myself.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: How to Turn a Basic Bowl

texbrandt:

Interesting point. I know that Kelly is new to the beard world! LOL

Anyhow, for anyone who might find this of interest - we covered lung protection in this (one of several) article a few years back:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/Workshop/WorkshopPDF.aspx?id=2498

Cheers all,

-Ed

Re: How to Make a Checkered Inlay

tmercer: I used a satin finish paper and had the print made at a custom digital outfit in New York that I love. The only downside was that - since this is a panoramic print - they had to use 16x20 paper - which makes it a bit more expensive for the print (in this case, $45). But the materials were essentially free as was the actual image so I felt it was worth it, and now have a happy grandmother. LOL.

Best,

Ed

Re: How to Make a Checkered Inlay

Hi wdcraftr1:

In my frame, I actually experimented by using the end grain side but the demonstration in my post is for face grain - since that's more popular.

Man, you have a sharp eye!

Best,

Ed

Re: Free Plan: Shaker Blanket Chest

Hi Thumphr,

I would suggest building the chest as-is out of cherry and then lining the interior of the blanket trough with some 1/4-in. - 3/8-in cedar. I wouldn't glue the cedar in, as this would cause movement problems but rather, make it a friction fit - much like is done with humidors when lining them with Spanish cedar. Also, after a couple of years, that nice cedar aroma might diminish. This can be remedied by giving the cedar a quick light sanding with some 220-grit sandpaper to release some more of those aromatic oils.
Good luck!
Ed Pirnik
Web Producer

Re: How to Install Butt Hinges

Peter:

Your comments open up an excellent debate. As someone who has played around with both less expensive stamped hinges as well as higher end (like Brusso) solid brass hinges, I've always felt that the cheaper models have way too much slop in them - something Garrett referred to in the article. He - and I usually - opt for the solid brass models since the stamped metal isn't simply wrapped around a pin but rather, after the two leaves are made, they're fit together and then the pin hole is drilled through - leading to a much tighter fit.

Also, you may have missed it (this is a pretty long post) but he does refer to mortising the case - the same way he mortised the door. He goes on to say that in cases where you're just not going to be able to fit a trim router or chisel into the case for mortising, this step should be done while the piece is still in component pieces.

hope that helps - but let the "Great Hinge Debate" begin!!

Cheers to you,

-Ed Pirnik
FWW Web Producer

Re: Hardwood selector is free and fantastic

sgresh:

You make a very valid point. I'm the guy who put together that eletter in which it was referred to as an "app." It was not my intention to mislead, rather, since the site hosts a very basic application, I thought originally it was an appropriate term but in thinking about it after having reaad your comment, it's not a good idea to refer to something like this as an "app" in the age of the iPhone. Point taken.

Cheers,

Ed Pirnik
Web Producer

Re: Free Box Plan from a Box-Building Pro

Good question gjwhite58. I've fired off an email to Doug posing your question.

Hope to hear back soon.

Cheers,

-Ed Pirnik
Web Producer
FineWoodworking.com

Re: A Simple Way to Inlay Mother of Pearl

JYA: The material is called "Acrylester."

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Spanish woodworker shares finer points of side rabbet planes

Rotceh:

Ahora, dejame ver si puedo contestar en Mallorquin! Ja ja ja ja!

Un fuerte saludo,

Eduardo "Ed"

Re: Spanish woodworker shares finer points of side rabbet planes

Rotceh:

Por favor, dejame contestar su comentario aqui.

He trabajado aqui en esta revista casi dos años y le puedo decir que yo mismo, soy de una familia de carpinteros españoles. Mis tios - de Barcelona y tambien de Mallorca, construyeron muebles divinos, pues, no entiendo porque piensa ud. que nadie aqui conece la historia larga de muebleria española.

Yo soy carpintero, mis tios fueron carpinteros, mis abuelos - carpinteros. Toods de España. Todos orgullosos de sus obras. Pues, quien aqui no entiende que hay carpinteros llenos de talento en España?

Y Punto.

Re: Does MDF Belong in Fine Furniture?

Hi Bob,

It might depend upon where you live. At least here in the northeast, Baltic birch ply will run you around $55 a sheet for decent quality material.

Best,

Ed

Re: Does MDF Belong in Fine Furniture?

MakeitWithWood:

You raise a lot of great points.

Here's my questions. There's plenty of mass-market furniture out there built from MDF but quite frankly, all of the stuff I've seen is poorly built, meant to last for perhaps only a 3-5 years. Why can't someonw come out with an economical furniture line built using a combination of MDF and hardwood? No, this wouldn't be "fine furniture." But for cost-conscious folks, I think it would offer them a happy medium. And who knows - maybe there's a great business plan in there somewhere?
Cheers,

Ed

Re: Does MDF Belong in Fine Furniture?

Speaker cabinets! I had never thought about that. I would imagine that MDF absorbs a good deal of sound, thus helping to impart a warm tone to music? I'm no audiologist so I'm just taking a stab in the dark. That said, I am a lover of classical and jazz on vinyl and I have thought about building my own custom set of speakers.
Here's where I see a lot of debate: Lots of folks use the stuff for humidors lids, veneering over the MDF. Yet some folks say that moisture DOES pose a problem with this stuff. Conflicting information. Anybody here have any experience with using it in this manner? I only ask because I've been working on a couple of fine humidor projects recently. One of them will be lined with Spanish Cedar I was able to bring back from Cuba, and the lid lift will be fashioned from some iron I brought back from the El Morro (the old Spanish fort guarding the entrance to the Bay of Havana). I was able to pick up lots of large chunks that had flaked off of an old 17th century canon. Meaning: I want to make sure this humidor is built to last. The one I'm hoping to use those materials on consists of a box made of mahogany, veneered with rosewood and some fancy stringing. The lid is built from a high-quality multi-ply but I have considered using MDF. Any thoughts?

Best,

Ed

Re: Free Plan: Space Saving Tool Rack

An EXCELLENT point, Andrew. In a tight shop - positioning is EVERYTHING!

Thanks for that tip!

Ed

Re: Ideas for Woodworking's Own Reality TV

Slap Roy Underhill into a modern shop. heh heh heh

Re: Is Copying Furniture Legal?

There was also Asa Christiana's post regarding the ethical quandry posed by selling furniture based on FWW articles:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/18501/is-it-ok-to-sell-furniture-based-on-fww-articles

It's an excellent topic to be sure. Reproducing the work of a craftsman like Maloof - who has a style that's instantly recognizable by those operating in the "wood world" is fine for personal use. That said, selling an item like that would pose a major ethical problem. But that's a slippery slope. How does one define whose style is "known enough" so as to make it untouchable? Where do you draw the line?

Best,

Ed

Re: How much camber should be in plane irons?

Hi Aaron,

Good question. I'm sure different folks have different methods. I'm going to send Rob an email to make sure he chimes in but I can tell that my method - also the method of our art director whose blades cut shavings fine enough to see through - is to simply apply more pressure on one side of the iron (in a honing jig), then switch pressure to the other side, then even pressure, repeat, etc. This method has always produced excellent results for me. It's largely a matter of trial and error. There have been plenty of times when I've put a bit too much camber on a smoother. Just experiment.

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Free Plan: Build a Rustic Chicken Coop

A really unique design, David. Nice!!! It's interesting just how many folks are getting into the chicken-raising "business." Over at John's house (I was there working on a video workshop shoot recently) - he's got little chicks all over the place. A new batch are living by his front door - almost ready to head out into the world. LOL

Best,

Ed

Re: Total garage shop makeover

Mike: I think we're going to have to do a video tour of this baby!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: CNC is Knocking on Your Shop Door. Will You Answer?

RAReeder: I think the bottom line is that the cost for these tools will continue to plummet. Years ago, I worked in the advertising photography industry and can recall when the first pro-level digital SLR camera backs came out from Kodak. The DCS-460's (one of the earliest models) retailed for over $30K. Nowadays you can snag an excellent digital SLR body for under $500. It's gonna happen.

Personally, I think this technology will be a boon for folks who are building small-scale production pieces, dipping their toes into some sort of professional market. The technology has it's place. Would I use such a machine? Absolutely not. Not because I feel it's evil but rather, I simply enjoy making sawdust by hand.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Play Against the Grain: The Wrong Way to Rip

RGCopple: That "I give up" button might not be a bad idea. Let me run it by the folks over here. And thanks for the suggestion!
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Play Against the Grain: The Wrong Way to Rip

hhmacdonald:

I have a feeling that much sooner-rather than later-some sort of sawstop-like technology will be standard industry practice. Heck, might even be federally mandated for all I know.

Also, lots of folks here are talking about splitters and riving knives - perhaps one of the best--and simplest add-ons to a tablesaw.

Best,

Ed

Re: Help Us Help You Sell Furniture

SRogers93: Your comment got me thinking, perhaps some information on understanding internet metrics and search functions might work. If you're going to market yourself online, you've got to have a basic understanding of how these things work.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: IWF Alert: DeWalt's little router is a show-stopper

kingwah: Tell that to my wife. Ha ha ha

Re: IWF Alert: DeWalt's little router is a show-stopper

I am truly bummed after having read this. I bought a sweet little Rigid trim router not two months ago. While I LOVE the Rigid - boy would it be great to have that plunge capability, darn it!

Re: Start Woodworking: How to make a Wooden Spice Jar Rack

Hi atoma,

I believe that the holes are drilled in such a way that the circumference of the circle just comes around enough so that the edges hug the jars a bit. You actually have to lift each jar up and out of the hole in order to get them out - at least that's how it looks to me. I don't think there is a tip danger.

Anyhow, thanks Cy for putting the time into making this great post for newbies!

Best,

-Ed

Re: How to Sharpen a Handplane Iron

Thanks for the kind words, Stephany.

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

Hi ColinL: Yes, you are correct - and that's one of the five listed errors.

Best,

Ed

Re: Teddy Roosevelt's Lumber Legacy

Beachton - Straight to the inferno! No joke. Roosevelt HATED this place! I kid. I kid. Nice catch guys, and some welcome humor.
Cheers,
Ed

Re: Weird Woodworking Tools

Hi Aaron: Yup, this little kit is fantastic. Only trouble is, it's tough to get a hold of hypodermic needles, which are fantastic for injecting glue precisely where you want it. Anyhow, glad you've had the same luck!
Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Rockwell's Jigsaw in a Box

In my humble opinion - it's not a great tool for woodworkers per-se, however, for the ocassional DIYer or craftsy-types - this looks like a potential winner.

Re: Weird Woodworking Tools

saschafer: Edmund Scientific! I had forgotten about those folks. I used to love pouring through the thick catalog when I was a kid. Thanks for the memory.

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Mildly humorous parody of The New Yankee Workshop

Point taken. LOL

Re: Vote Now! Time is Running Out!

Hi jentara:

Voting for this contest is no different than for any other. Voting is done by the community. on the "Vote for Our Next Contest Winner" blog post, where the poll appears. See this page:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/29258/vote-for-our-next-contest-winner

The poll was originally located in the area where it now reads "Voting is now closed." Once voting ends, the poll disappears.

"Thumbs-ups" have nothing to do with voting, rather, they're simply an internet widget used on most sites these days to indicate popular content.

The voting poll was prominently placed on our homepage for a rotator (the large images you see at the top of the homepage when you go to finewoodworking.com) and was heavily promoted via the FW eLetter which goes to 300K subscribers, facebook, twitter, and the blog rollup.

As I said earlier - voting is done by the community, not Fine Woodworking, not Taunton. The numbers are gathered and tallied by a third party in the interest of fairness.

Hope this answers your questions. If you have any more - don't be shy! I'm usually lurking around here somewhere.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Official Rules Tip Top Table Contest

Voting is done by the community. on the "Vote for Our Next Contest Winner" blog post, where the poll appears. See this page:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/29258/vote-for-our-next-contest-winner

The poll was originally located in the area where it now reads "Voting is now closed." Once voting ends, the poll disappears.

"Thumbs-ups" have nothing to do with voting, rather, they're simply an internet widget used on most sites these days to indicate popular content.

The voting poll was prominently placed on our homepage for a rotator (the large images you see at the top of the homepage when you go to finewoodworking.com) and was heavily promoted via the FW eLetter which goes to 300K subscribers, facebook, twitter, and the blog rollup.

As I said earlier - voting is done by the community, not Fine Woodworking, not Taunton. The numbers are gathered and tallied by a third party in the interest of fairness.

Hope this answers your questions. If you have any more - don't be shy! I'm usually lurking around here somewhere.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Tip-Top Tables Contest: We Have a Winner!

Hello colorintuitive,

Voting is done by the community. on the "Vote for Our Next Contest Winner" blog post, where the poll appears. See this page:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/29258/vote-for-our-next-contest-winner

The poll was originally located in the area where it now reads "Voting is now closed." Once voting ends, the poll disappears.

"Thumbs-ups" have nothing to do with voting, rather, they're simply an internet widget used on most sites these days to indicate popular content.

The voting poll was prominently placed on our homepage for a rotator (the large images you see at the top of the homepage when you go to finewoodworking.com) and was heavily promoted via the FW eLetter which goes to 300K subscribers, facebook, twitter, and the blog rollup.

As I said earlier - voting is done by the community, not Fine Woodworking, not Taunton. The numbers are gathered and tallied by a third party in the interest of fairness.

Hope this answers your questions. If you have any more - don't be shy! I'm usually lurking around here somewhere.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Vote Now! Time is Running Out!

HI BWoodstock:

Voting is done by the community and is limited on vote per IP address. "Thumbs-up" have no impact on voting.

Best,

-Ed

Re: Vote Now! Time is Running Out!

Hi furniture_artist: Those are the stats as of the posting time of this blog. I never published percentages or stats previous to this blog post so I'm not sure what numbers you are referring to.

Best,

-Ed

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

I think this is becoming a competition for who has the nastiest story. OK, I'm in:

Years ago when I was working as a timber-frame carpenter in rural Connecticut, I worked with a trim carpenter who wore blue rubber caps on two of his fingers in order to cover some insightly stumps. One afternoon, I just couldn't help it - I asked him "what happened?"

Apparently, he was working on a job one day, jointing some trim stock on his machine, set up in the driveway when a pretty woman walked by. You know the rest of the story. He turned his head and kept on going with the cut - the cutterhead chewed up two fingers. Always keep your eyes on your hands and your blade/bit! Sheesh!

He still swears she was worth it though. Ha ha ha

Best,

-Ed

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

TMitchell: Yup - that's the one that always makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up as well - yet I've seen people do it many times. We had to get pretty creative to pull it off safely for the photo.

Best,

Ed

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

greywolf6: I hear you. Most folks I've encountered find the blade guard to be a major hinderance to seeing their cut. Heck, I've seen very few cabinet shops with them in use. That said, it is perhaps one of the best ways to keep those precious fingers intact. Well, that AND a little dose of fear. I still fear the tablesaw and I find that the emotion keeps me much safer in the long run. I treat the tool with the same respect I did when I made my first cut many years ago and as a result - I've never had a single accident. Not even close.

Best,

Ed

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

bobinboerne: I shall immediately raise the issue of your "revocation" with the model. He will be crushed, for sure! Ha ha

-Ed

Re: Play Fine Woodworking's Game: Against the Grain

TimNott and others correctly pointed out the lack of a guard. That's what we call here, an editorial oversite. The guards are generally removed for visual clarity but you folks raise and excellent point and I think it's worth including a notation beneath the image stating: "Blade guard has been removed for clarity." A good catch that keeps me humble!

As for the wedding ring, I walked around the office to take a poll on that point. Most folks agreed that the ring point is more a matter of personal preference. That said, raising all these many points is in part, the point of the game. I make folks go to the blog post so that they can access the comments after playing, and read all the additional tidbits of information we get from our readers. So keep 'em coming - and thank you!

Cheers all and thanks for playing. By the way - this was staged - as I think it'd be hard to grab a photo of anyone that crazy. The hands do belong to one of our staffers though! Ha ha ha.

And as for that starched white dress shirt - too funny. Since I shot this in the summer - nobody at the office had long sleeves on, and the only shirt I could dig up out of our storage closet was a long sleeve, white FWW button down. Actually, we all made the same jokes about woodworking in a dress shirt, here at the office.

Best,

Ed

Re: Do woodworkers hold the key to a quick clean-up of the gulf oil spill?

MFournier: Unless I'm mistaken, oil booms don't absorb oil, they simply corral a slick and keep it as one "unit," as opposed to breaking apart and going all over the place. It's simply a final "rope" (rope is not the perfect analogy but my brain's not all fired up right now - still early).

There has been a lot of talk about centrifuges here but in my mind, there's simply too much of the stuff for that to be a viable option. This is like an entire lake of oil.

Sigh.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Fast Fix: Vise Insert Prevents Racking

billyfishhead: That's a perfect question for the Knots forum. I'm betting you'll get a TON of answers if you post in there. Hope it helps!

http://forums.finewoodworking.com/forum

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Do woodworkers hold the key to a quick clean-up of the gulf oil spill?

cahudson42: Oddly enough, Kevin Costner beat you tot he punch - ha ha ha. Check this out:

http://localtechwire.com/business/local_tech_wire/news/blogpost/7822012/

Re: Who needs a saw? Just blow up the next tree you need to fell

Did you see the guy PLUNGE THE TIP of his saw bar directly into the tree!?

I'm just sayin' - and I'm speaking as someone who spent a LOT of farm time cutting a LOT of trees down back in the day - that's perhaps one of the craziest things you can do with a chain saw. Can you say "kick back" zone? LOL

I'm still stunned by this video.

Re: Homemade Horizontal Router Table

Hi toych: Yes, it does have dust collection - although we didn't use it for the blog since the vacuum would have caused audio problems. There is a port on the right hand side of the stationary table, as you're looking at Matt head-on, standing behind the bench.

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Homemade Horizontal Router Table

4th Axis: That's an excellent point regarding the slides. In fact, we've gotten a couple of designs over the years that use sealed bearing movements.

Anyhow, I'm glad you folks got a kick out of this. We're looking into shooting more of these little video blogs - where appropriate. If you have any requests on the types of topics you'd like to see in these quick-form videos, please don't hesitate to list them here in the comments.

Cheers,
Ed Pirnik

Re: BOOK GIVEAWAY: 500 Tables (Updated with winner)

I know I can't enter this giveaway but I couldn't resist:

"Another example of exquisite craftsmanship could be found towards the end of the tour, where Madame Tussaud's skilled sculptors have delivered a stunning rendition of Fine Woodworking contributor Greg Paolini. The wax likeness is accurate down to the last eyebrow hair and the reproduction workshop smells of linseed oil and sawdust."

Cheers,

Ed

Re: More Details on the Carlos Osorio Tablesaw Lawsuit

Will_Matney, you make a good point. The SawStop is certainly no "cure-all." I have never, in my many years of using tablesaws, even come close to having an accident- simply because I have a healthy fear of the tool. When I'm making a cut, my eyes are on my fingers, all the way through the cut. While fear can be a paralyzing force, when tempered, understood, and respected, it can really keep you safe.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: A Brand New Bench Video!

LOL. Trust me, you haven't seen a bench with these details;)
Unfortunately, I can't spill the beans - yet.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: A Brand New Bench Video!

Hi Gary,

Right now we're in the editing process. To give you an idea how in depth the whole process is - we've got about 11 or 12 one hour tapes to go through! The workshop will be up in the coming months and I'll probably chime in again via the blogs as the premiere date approaches. Hope that helps!

I can tell you that this project - the sheer scale, etc, was a doozey! In fact, that "colleague that wound up with a prescription for muscle relaxants?" Yeah, that was me. Ha ha ha.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Updated: Build-Your-Own Power Tool Plans

Hello everyone: I've just fixed the link to the Treadle Lathe PDF. It should be working for you. Glad to hear the material was appreciated!

Re: Scraptacular Contest Winners Announced

Hi Tom, we'd be happy to fill you in.

Over 1,000 site users voted in the poll and here are the percentages:

Eye Candy: 21%
Dulcimer: 16%
Home is Where the Hearth Is: 14%

Also, keep in mind that to keep folks from voting multiple times for there own piece and in the interest of fairness, we limit voting by IP address, username, etc, etc.


Re: Make it Stick: A Guide to Glue Ups

Ay ay ay,

Indeed Tom, there are a few more pages to the post:)

Cheers and happy gluing!

-Ed

Re: Make it Stick: A Guide to Glue Ups

Hi Tom77,

The purpose of a poll is indeed to stimulate member interest, and that's why the polls allow users to leave comments. To simply say "yes" or "no" would be pointless. Hence, we like folks to leave input that many times, is quite valuable.

As always - thanks for commenting - and keep 'em coming!

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: Making the King's Furniture

Although I disagree with him, LeeSnyder certainly brings up a very valid point. Is it immoral to use ivory in this manner?

I would say no. The damage to the animal was already done - decades ago, and to simply throw out the ivory and pretend it never existed, would be simply awful. At the very least, the material is being used as opposed to simply wasted.

Do I believe we should be able to hunt animals for their ivory? Absolutely not. That said, I don't see the point in tossing away pre-existing ivory.

Lee's effort however, in choosing to "rain on the parade" is noble - especially amid all the accolades for Radelow's work. From a philosophical standpoint, he is staying absolutely true to his ideals, his moral compass - despite the fact the furniture, and the craftsmanship, are stunning, there is no wavering on his part.

There's a lesson here.

Best,

-Ed

Re: What are The Turning Points Along Your Woodworking Path?

For me, it all comes down to watching others at work - especially working with other folks - with greater technical ability than myself - in the shop, at the same time.

-Ed

Re: Arts and Crafts Picture Frame

Kelly, this is great! Gave me some inspiration for an oversized framing project I've been working on .

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Are CNC machines ready for Fine Woodworking?

I think that perhaps the bottom line is: nobody's suggesting CNC machines will take the place of a knowledgable craftsperson. It's more about knowing when to employ this technology and when to say "it's not necessary." Like many things in life.

Re: Are CNC machines ready for Fine Woodworking?

I think I'd pose the question: "Is FINE WOODWORKING ready for CNC machines?" LOL

Re: Nakashima's Leg

Hi gizmoman: I have a copy of Hoadley's book sitting right here at my desk. I'll see what I can find and post more information in the comments section.

Cheers and thanks!

-Ed

Re: Nakashima's Leg

ClifP - that's a wild story. It reminds of the house my father grew up in. It was a simple two-story row house in a blue collar city in New Jersey - probably built about 1900-1910. When they bought the place in the early fifties, all the moldings were COVERED in goopy white paint. It took my grandparents and my father about five years to completely strip the house and shellac everything. They did an incredible job - as I never saw the slightest remnant of paint on that wood!

Re: The Wacky Tool File

Come on, really?! Are you serious? Is someone actually charging money for this?

Re: Woodworking Tips Have a New Home

Hi folks,

Thanks very much for your comments. You hit on a good point, as just other day I was chatting with someone about possibly slowing the FF just a bit. Thanks for helping to confirm that hunch!

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

PhastEddie,

Were the cans of amber shellac just as old as the clears?

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

AEW -

Here's the rub with the "ester" theory. Even if the alcohol and acid combined to form and esther, it doesn't explain the buildup of pressure in the can.

When I returned to the hardware store to clue in the shopkeeper, I took him over to a few of the other cans he had in there - all of which had bulging lids. That's a considerable amount of pressure. What is producing all that gas??

Still waiting on a couple of manufacturer explanations. No doubt folks are checking with attorneys, worrying about God knows what. I did of course make it clear that this wasn't their fault. These cans had bene sitting on the shelf for YEARS.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

marzetti,

I tend to disagree. I've used both - premixed and flakes - and to be honest, I've been quite happy with the final product acheived using both products. Of course in the end, this is all subjective.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

Oh, and I'll be sure to post a quick photo of the now completed picture frames. They're quite nice - a simple, clean design.

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

AEW's response about forming an ester is one I've heard several times and I suspect there is some truth to it. Not to worry, as I'm in contact with a couple of manufacturers and hope to have an answer for you all quite soon.

Many thanks for all the interesting theories, suggestions and tips. This is exactly what the blog community was meant to provide.

Cheers,
-Ed

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

I actually posed the question to my father, a microbiologist, and his response was rather similar to that of "davecefai," especially that bit concerning "fermentation" which is what I originally thought might have happened. He had very little in the way of any idea as to what the heck might have caused this.

Anyhow, the frame came out nicely so, in the end, all is well.

Thanks all, for your comments and suggestions.

Cheers,

Ed

Re: The Mysterious Case of the Exploding Shellac Can

Hi Larry,

I haven't returned to the hardware store yet to exchange the can but before I do, I'll have a look at the condition of the inside. I'll let you know what I find.

Luckily, the stained maple came right off with a few passes of the block plane. Phew!

Re: Link Roundup: Surface Prep with Hand Tools vs. Power Tools

Congratulations RandyW for having won our hand plane. Also, congratulations to crisp3, who won our DVD.

Cheers all!

-Ed

Re: Hand v. Power Tool Showdown: Watch it Live Online Nov. 12

FWW Smackdown!

Re: How to build a table, in 60 seconds

Hello everyone,

Hmmm, well, it would seem we touched a nerve with this one. When the piece was promoted in the eLetter, the intent was not to be misleading but rather, to come up with an interesting headline to describe the video. We thought it was a great little piece that worked as an inspirational type of video, getting folks fired up to go and build.

I was a bit surprised when I read some of the negative comments here. That said, we take reader feedback pretty seriously around here so, I hope those of you who expressed disappointment understand that your voices were heard.

Many thanks for taking the time to read this post and sorry for the mix-up!

Cheers,

-Ed Pirnik
FWW

Re: Broken power tool: Junk it or fix it?

"I replace brushes and cords, but by the time a portable tool needs bearings replacement is usually the way to go."

Makes perfect sense to me.

Re: Broken power tool: Junk it or fix it?

In the past, I've repurposed partially broken tools and home appliances. I've also scavenged old power tools for still-working switches, cords, etc. It's a good idea to keep some of this material on-hand - especially the cords - for easy repairs to other tools.

-Ed

Re: Toothpick art may float your boat, but is it woodworking?

I wouldn't consider it an example of woodworking. While there's a heck of a lot of glue-work and perhaps some sanding and cutting involved, there's no real shaping at work here.

That said, I don't mean to sound disparaging. This work is incredible and a joy to see!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: Reader Says Mythbusters Missed on Hammer Strikes

I can't help but wonder if perhaps this happens more often when striking a newer hammer with an older model. Has the quality of steel changed? The hardening process? Would it be the newer steel causing a chip in the older tool or vice versa? I've heard opinions from both sides of the spectrum. And because of that, I'm building a rig and breaking out the slow-motion camera. With any luck, I'll be able to pull off something interesting. Please keep your fingers crossed!

Cheers,

Ed

Re: What is this Tool?

Happy Monday folks,

mvflaim, you won yourself a book.

Cheers,
Ed

Re: Book Review: "Creating a Fine Art Entry Table"

Hi Koonan: The most positive aspect of Ortiz's book lay in the fact that even if the style of this piece isn't to your taste, it moves you to create. All those photos of luscious bubinga and wenge being milled and shaped really gets the creative juices flowing.

Glad you enjoyed the review.

-Ed

Re: Why Yes, I am a Dandy Woodworker

Seeing as how I inhabit the cube next to Matt, I can attest to the fact that he's no Dandy. If I recall correctly, he has a background that includes cage-fighting (I joke).

Well done, Matt.

-Ed

Re: Tool Time in Vegas: AWFS 2009 Roundup

zenon001,

For some jointer/planer-related news, make sure you check out Asa's post on the new spiral cutterheads. It's in my list of updates above.

Cheers,

ed

Re: Walking Tables Creep Me Out

Is it cool? Yes.

That said, I hope I never encounter one of these things "in the flesh." The creep factor is off-the-meter!

Best,

-Ed

Re: Tool Time in Vegas: AWFS 2009 Roundup

Nice, Ralph!

Hybrid model available, perhaps?

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Tool Time in Vegas: AWFS 2009 Roundup

Hi Ted,

I just noticed your comment and wanted to keep you folks all up-to-date.

Anissa wasn't able to travel to the show so Editor Asa Christiana will be filling in for her.

Be sure to tell him Ed said hello.

Cheers,

-Ed

Re: Splittin' Cane

Hi shrogers4:

I strongly recommend getting a hold of Hoagy B. Carmichael's book. It is very detailed! I've been reading and re-reading it for nearly 20 years now! A little on the pricey side - since I believe it's long out of print - but really well put together.

Good luck!

-Ed

Re: Make a Plane from a Kit: Brese Small Smoother - beginnings

This post was an absolute pleasure to browse through, Derek.

Many thanks,

-Ed



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