Jigs

Hinge mortising jig

comments (2) October 15th, 2012 in Jigs

spensivedust spensivedust, member
thumbs up 1 user recommends

The jig on a workpiece. The end stop on the threaded rod and the mortise width stop can be set quickly. The router base is then set for the height of the mortise. Once done the jig can be swapped to the other end of the workpiece and then to other workpieces without further adjustment.
The jig on the other end of the workpiece. Ive done 32 hinge mortises in 20 minutes without trying. Note that the edge guide of the router base must slide under the arm. There is a piece of sandpaper glued to the edge guide. This reduces required clamping pressure to keep the edge guide stable, and provides clearance between the edge guide and the arm.
Rather than cutting slots the sides and arms are glued up. The gap is 9/32. All stock should be jointed and planed for accuracy.
The parts of the jig that contact the workpiece should be wide enough to provide good stability and adequate friction when the knobs are tightened. Its not a bad idea to glue sandpaper on the pieces that contact the workpiece.
The jig on a workpiece. The end stop on the threaded rod and the mortise width stop can be set quickly. The router base is then set for the height of the mortise. Once done the jig can be swapped to the other end of the workpiece and then to other workpieces without further adjustment. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

The jig on a workpiece. The end stop on the threaded rod and the mortise width stop can be set quickly. The router base is then set for the height of the mortise. Once done the jig can be swapped to the other end of the workpiece and then to other workpieces without further adjustment.


A real time saver, easy to make and use. The jig as pictured handles work pieces up to 3" wide, and makes accurate mortises up to 4" long with a palm router and 3/8" bit. The dimensions can be adjusted for your own equipment and applications. The two "sides" are identical (except for the end stop threaded rod) which makes construction simple. A single setup can be used for hinges evenly spaced from the each end of the work piece. You can route from either side of the jig. The router base shown is for a palm router.



posted in: Jigs, jig


Comments (2)

spensivedust spensivedust writes: As with many things, it's harder to describe than to do. Let's say you've marked the first mortise and you've got the bit depth set. Let's say that you are going to do the mortise on the right end of the workpiece. Loosen all the knobs on the guide.

1. Place the jig on the workpiece and snug the two halves against the workpiece.
2. Place the router so the base is against the right side cross arm and the right side of the bit aligns with the right edge of the mortise. Now position the end stop so it touches the right end of the workpiece. That sets the right side of the mortise relative to the end of the workpiece.
3. Place the router so the base is against the left cross arm and the left side of the bit aligns with the left edge of the mortise. This sets the total width of the mortise. Snug the two big knobs. Move the width stop (the piece with the small knob) so it is against the left cross arm.
4. Adjust the router base edge guide so the back side of the bit aligns with the back edge of the mortise. Start routing.

A friend has promised to help me do a YouTube demo. When that gets done I'll post the link.

With the end stop and width stop set, the two larger knobs can be loosened without losing the adjustments. Since the guide is symmetric you turn it 180 deg., put it on the left end of the workpiece and cut that mortise without any further adjustment.

I did eight cabinet doors and jambs (32 mortises) in less than 30 minutes including setup. The jambs and door uprights were still raw and all the same length. I always trim my completed doors after the cabinet is built. That's the easiest way for me to get a really nice gap all around.



Posted: 10:06 am on October 27th

Skyeboat Skyeboat writes: It looks interesting and like you've put a lot of thought into it's design and use ... a bit more of a discussion about how it's used would be helpful.
Posted: 7:17 pm on October 23rd

You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.

Advertise here for as little as $50. Learn how

Save up to 52% on Fine Woodworking

 

Become a Better Woodworker