Reader's Gallery

Turn of the century cabinet makers tool chest.

comments (6) June 4th, 2012 in Reader's Gallery

toolchest toolchest, member
thumbs up 19 users recommend


The first picture is an exterior shot showing the walnut , veneer, and dovetails I used to make the shell of the chest. About 220 dovetails went into making this chest. The inside of the chest lid was inspired from looking at Steve Lattas federal furniture work on Fine Woodworking.The additiional inlays are my own creation. Each of the two tills have six drawers. Birdseye maple was laid on using the hammer an hide glue method. The hex inlays and cock bead is ebony. The forth picture is the outside of my saw till. The inside of the saw till is veneered with curly maple.


Design or Plan used: My own design

posted in: Reader's Gallery, WorkBench, tool chest


Comments (6)

user-2356384 user-2356384 writes: Замечательно слов нет.
Posted: 12:15 pm on January 1st

Olliewood Olliewood writes: Very impressive; I can only imagine the hours that must have gone into the building of this chest. Nice work!!!
Posted: 8:07 pm on August 3rd

toolchest toolchest writes: Hello Neo,
After the drawer is made. Look up cockbead for all of your answers. Thanks---Ken

Good morning Sensei,
Grand children are faster amd more fun to watch. Regards--Ken
Posted: 6:09 am on June 9th

neobassman neobassman writes: What a beautiful traditional chest and fantastic inlay! I'm curious about the ebony around the drawers- did you apply the ebony before dovetailing or apply to the assembled drawer?
Posted: 9:49 pm on June 6th

mokusakusensei mokusakusensei writes: Sure looks sharp! I would be very concerned about putting the first ding into that nice till. Take it to a high school shop for a week and then you can say that it has a natural patina.
Posted: 12:38 pm on June 5th

zbop zbop writes: Very, very nicely done!!!
Posted: 12:43 pm on June 4th

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