Shaker chimney cupboard questions?

comments (12) February 22nd, 2012 in blogs

MPekovich Michael Pekovich, art director
thumbs up 9 users recommend


One feature we're hoping to add to our video workshops is the ability to post questions about the project. Right now there's no way to do that.

As a follow up to the Shaker chimney cupboard project I recently worked on, I thought I'd start this post in order to answer any questions you might have. In addition, I'll post the answers to any emails that are sent my way.

 

-Mike



posted in: blogs, cabinet, dovetails, cherry, shaker, frame and panel


Comments (12)

sfeinberg sfeinberg writes: Mike, what finish did you use on the cherry and how do you get the pine to match the cherry color? thanks.
Posted: 1:25 pm on April 23rd

FingerlessJoe FingerlessJoe writes: I can't seem to find the advertised plans. Really all I need is the cutting list. Where can I get this, please?

Bill
Posted: 8:19 am on April 13th

MPekovich MPekovich writes: Hi Chris, I know what you mean about sappy cherry. I actually found this at my local lumber yard, which was a bit of a surprise. When I need really nice cherry for a project, I often order from Irion Lumber in Pennsylvania and have it shipped to me. I've never been disappointed by anything they've sent and the prices are comparable to my local sources.

I typically use Titebond II unless I need a longer open time or need a more waterproof bond. I always use Titebond III when making cutting boards.

Also, Titebond III dries with a brown glue line which is great for darker woods, but not so great for light woods like pine or maple. Cherry can really go either way.

Mike
Posted: 11:46 am on May 22nd

cahudson42 cahudson42 writes: Mike,

What a great piece and video. Thank you!

And what beautiful cherry! Mine seems always half sapwood and 5" wide. Where did you get it?

Finally, I see you used Titebond II - not III. Reason?

Chris
Posted: 1:50 am on April 28th

MPekovich MPekovich writes: Hi Gary- I have a dedicated workbench, but you're right, I've outfitted my outfeed table as a workbench as well. For years though, my only workbench doubled as an outfeed table for my tablesaw and it served me very well in a tight space. The obvious downside is the need to clear the clutter for ripping on occasion. I have that same problem in my current set up because I seem to use my outfeed table as much as my workbench, but it's not really a bother.
The other consideration is that the outfeed table needs to be at the same height as the tablesaw which is about 2 inches lower than I'd ideally like a workbench to be. In reality, I can't say I notice the diffence when switching between benches.

Good luck, Mike
Posted: 6:14 pm on March 28th

GBurg GBurg writes: I loved the video series; imagining where I might put such a piece in our house. Tangential question: I thought I noticed that your table saw out feed is your workbench; is that correct? I have a small workspace, want to build a bench and need out feed for my saw. Are you content with your setup? What are the pros and cons or what would you design differently about your workbench to optimize it since it doubles as your tablesaw out feed? Please forgive the question if I am mistaken.
Thanks.
Gary
Posted: 11:21 pm on March 26th

MPekovich MPekovich writes: It shouldn't pose a problem to make the cabinet out of cedar. Another option would be to make just the frame and panel back out of cedar. Which ever way you go, the important thing is to not apply finish to the inside face of the cedar.

Good luck, Mike
Posted: 9:57 am on February 29th

DWats DWats writes: I was thinking about making one of these to store bath towels in. I'm thinking of using cedar, do you think this would be a good choice? It may actually be in the bathroom

Doug
Posted: 11:18 am on February 26th

MPekovich MPekovich writes: I bought my dovetail blade from Forrest Mfg (forestblades.com). They list 11.5, 9.5, and 7 degrees as options, they'll also grind a blade to your specifications. Be sure to let them know which way your saw tilts. The Forrest blade is $125, but a cheaper alternative would be to buy any blade with a flat-top grind and send it to them to be sharpened at the angle you want. In the FW shop we use an 8-in. Freud blade ground to 9.5 degrees.
Mike
Posted: 4:25 pm on February 24th

abincv abincv writes: It's a very nice piece. Where did you get the 7.5 degree table saw blade? Was it specially ground?

Arthur
Posted: 10:58 am on February 24th

MPekovich MPekovich writes: There's no article in the works just yet. We've run some great articles on Shaker furniture by Christian Becksvoort fairly recently. So if the editor did choose to run an article on the chimney cupboard, it wouldn't be for a while.

Mike
Posted: 4:39 pm on February 22nd

gthynes gthynes writes: I've seen the excellent videos. Is there an actual article in FWW magazine on the build of this cupboard?
Posted: 2:13 pm on February 22nd

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