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Timeless Revolutionary Era Kitchen Remodel

comments (4) September 12th, 2011 in blogs

CustomMade CustomMade Staff, contributor
thumbs up 2 users recommend

Kitchen remodel by Superior Woodcraft. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Kitchen remodel by Superior Woodcraft.

Photo: Kitchen remodel by Superior Woodcraft.

Woodworker Patrick Kennedy of Superior Woodcraft in Doylestown, PA belongs to the Bucks-Mont Chapter of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI). One of the many great outcomes Patrick has seen by being a part of this trade association is teaming up with a fellow member Bob DuBree of Creative Contracting in North Wales, PA to create a beautiful timeless kitchen remodel.

This custom kitchen was handcrafted using quarter sawn white oak and was inspired by the arts and crafts tradition.

arts and crafts custom kitchen quarter sawn white oak
Arts and crafts style kitchen remodel by Superior Woodcraft. Contact them at CustomMade.com.

This American revolutionary era farmhouse, built in the rolling hills of Medford, NJ, was in major need of remodeling. A cramped, two level, poorly designed space for modern living was recreated into a one-level spacious room by lifting the ceiling and creating a single level floor plan. The homeowners, originally from England and the birthplace of the arts and crafts tradition, found Superior Woodcraft's custom quarter sawn white oak cabinetry to be exactly the old world feel they desired.

revolutionary era farmhouse kitchen before remodeling
Revolutionary era farmhouse kitchen before being remodeled by Superior Woodcraft. Contact them at CustomMade.com.

Superior Woodcraft's traditional craftsmanship combined with DuBree's simplicity of design creates a kitchen that demonstrates truth to material, structure and function. The atmosphere is inviting, calm and warming to the soul. This space is a retreat from today's volatile and uncertain world. This kitchen is a testament to what can only be achieved by using hand-crafted cabinetry, local materials and local craftsman. Anything less is simply a material object, which lacks the integrity and spirit of the designer and craftsman; it lacks truth and honesty.

This article is from CustomMade.com, the internet's largest marketplace for custom made goods.



posted in: blogs, cabinet, arts and crafts, white oak


Comments (4)

KentMich KentMich writes: I now see that this advertising IS appropriate here in the Pro Shop - that's the stated purpose of it. But the link I clicked on to get here showed it as a Blog - editorial content. That's what has us upset.

The problem is with FWW, not Superior Woodcraft - don't put teasers to what LOOKS like editorial content when it isn't.
Posted: 2:08 pm on October 14th

KentMich KentMich writes: Get rid of it! Not only is it shameless advertising, it isn't even truthful! "Revolutionary Era" my ass - the house may be, but the kitchen sure isn't.
Posted: 1:16 pm on October 14th

aaronpetersen aaronpetersen writes: Julian,

I agree. This is BS. If custommade.com wants to put it on their website, fine, but not here where we pay.
Posted: 12:47 pm on September 28th

JulianBE JulianBE writes: This is just an advertisement. Why is it here, where I pay for my access?
Posted: 7:19 pm on September 21st

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