Reader's Gallery

Laundry room Cabinetry

comments (4) January 27th, 2011 in Reader's Gallery

MarkAReed MarkAReed, member
thumbs up 17 users recommend

These cabinets are made of prefinished clr. maple plywood with solid maple doors and face frames.
There are double rods in the left and right tall cabinets with 4 shelves above the center drawers.
 
The black granite counter tops have an interesting texture to them, like leather. 
 
These stacking units are tough to install inside a cabinet due to the exhaust vent and the water supply box. Code requires that it be accessible for service so we put it inside the broom closet and the vent slides in to a foam donut placed in just the right spot.
We also had to install a drain pan with a seperate drain that tied in over 10 ft away to avoid soap foam backing up under unit and to help with odors.
Dovetailed drawers are made of 3/4 solid maple and have HD full extension slides.
Alberto helped me build this unit. He is a proud cabinet maker who loves woodworking like me.
These cabinets are made of prefinished clr. maple plywood with solid maple doors and face frames.
There are double rods in the left and right tall cabinets with 4 shelves above the center drawers.
  - CLICK TO ENLARGE

These cabinets are made of prefinished clr. maple plywood with solid maple doors and face frames.

There are double rods in the left and right tall cabinets with 4 shelves above the center drawers.

 


These laundry cabinets were built for the Steers family Addition. 

There was an existing 2nd flr hall closet that was only 2 ft deep due to the roof angle behind it. We raised the roof to create a tiled, 10x10 laundry room with a dbl. window.

 



posted in: Reader's Gallery, cabinet, , maple, frame and panel, built-in


Comments (4)

MarkAReed MarkAReed writes: Good question Shtscore.
We had a SS pan made (200.00) that was exactly the right size inside the cabinet x 1" tall and then glued it to the new treated sub floor.

The 1/2" durock and tile butted flush to top of the front edge. Then we installed with silicone, treated 1" x 3" cleats with 2" holes x 3/16" deep, in front only, for the feet to keep it from walking.

To remove, just unhook lines, grab the bottom and lift slightly and pull it forward. Plug is behind unit and easy to reach once unit is out. The exhaust was the tough part.
to get the unit this tight you can't use a flex vent.

The floor joists were doubled and blocked to prevent shaking and noise from vibration. Very important on a second floor.
I would never recommend installing these units on a 2nd floor without a wall directly under it.

Note: this pan requires that you pour a pint of water in it at least once every 3-6 mos. to keep the p trap full to prevent odors from backing up.

Good luck with your project. Thanks for the thumbs up.
Posted: 9:51 am on January 29th

shtscore shtscore writes: Looks awesome! I'm doing a very similar set up. matter a fact I think I have the same washer and dryer. My concern about setting the washer and dryer in a cabinet is how do you pull it back out if you need to? I think it could be pushed in but to pull back out seems difficult.
Posted: 8:26 am on January 28th

MarkAReed MarkAReed writes: fdl,
My shop is small and I don't have a spray booth so I like to buy 3/4 prefinished clear maple plywood for the casework, wrap with hardwood panels and solid frames and have them sprayed by my cabinet finisher. Then I install them with biscuits.
The stain finish is an oil based product that was sprayed on, then 2 coats of poly that are rubbed out after drying for a week.
FYI- you have to tell these guys to finish all sides of the face frame if you prefer it. I hate it when painters don't finish things just because you can't see it.

Thank you for the compliment.


Posted: 8:18 am on January 28th

fdl fdl writes: Beautiful cabinets, how did you finish the maple to get such a rich color.
Posted: 6:54 pm on January 27th

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