The Editors Mailbox

The Editors Mailbox

Norm Abram at Old Sturbridge Village

comments (106) October 26th, 2009 in blogs

patrick_mccombe Patrick McCombe, contributor
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Impressed by the outpouring of support for Norm on the Fine Woodworking website, Sue Roman, President of Taunton Inc. thought we should give Norm a keepsake with some of the kind words written by his fans.
Old Sturbridge Villages collection of furniture has provided the inspiration for several New Yankee projects. Norm donated this piece from his own personal collection to the museum for a fundraiser. Norm said it was his first piece to use a traditional milk paint finish.
Like Norm, the woodworkers of the early 19th century had many hats to wear. With a less-affluent population than their coastal counterparts, these woodworkers were often farmers and carpenters during the Summer. I like how this cabinetmakers advertisement made mention of trading services for fresh food.
Impressed by the outpouring of support for Norm on the Fine Woodworking website, Sue Roman, President of Taunton Inc. thought we should give Norm a keepsake with some of the kind words written by his fans. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Impressed by the outpouring of support for Norm on the Fine Woodworking website, Sue Roman, President of Taunton Inc. thought we should give Norm a keepsake with some of the kind words written by his fans.


In case you haven't heard, The New Yankee Workshop is closing its doors to TV cameras and producers after 20 years, but the star of the show, Norm Abram says he sees himself making furniture and doing carpentry for the rest of his life.

This past Saturday, I attended a brunch where the master carpenter, in his typical self-deprecating style, talked about woodworking, his life, and the unlikely turn of events that made him a star (see video below). He was at the Old Sturbridge village in Sturbridge, Mass, dedicating a new exhibit focusing on furniture made in inland Massachusetts. Like the New Yankee, the furniture makers whose work is featured in the exhibit wore many hats, often working as farmers, carpenters and mechanics during the Summer. The museums' collection was the inspiration for a number of New Yankee projects. Norm is on the Board of Trustees and offered up a piece he made on the show from his own collection for a fundraiser benefiting the museum.


I had my point-and-shoot camera on hand to snap this quick video of Norm's brunch presentation. 

Norm talks the future
Of course the obvious question is, Why give up on a highly-rated show that continues to inspire woodworkers of all abilities in nearly every part of the globe? Norm didn't come right out and say it, but after 20 years of making furniture for The New Yankee Workshop and 30 years of doing carpentry on This Old House, Norm gave the impression he simply wants to work a little less and instead focus on his own projects. He made mention of building a home workshop, that may or may not become a television series. He thought he'd like to build a green home. And he plans to continue his involvement with Old Sturbridge Village, hopefully inspiring young people to take a greater interest in history.

Thanks Norm.



posted in: blogs, video, norm abram, sturbridge village


Comments (106)

borderdogs borderdogs writes: There is a blank spot without knowing Norm is on tv sometime during the weekend when I watched him. It's sad to know he's not going to do the New Yankee Workshop anymore. I think He had a practical, plain view to approaching & building a project which lent itself to an easy going instruction style. He inspired me over the years and I have built several of his pieces over the years. I actually think, at least in my opinion, he represents an era in woodworking & even in diy tv that some have tried to copy but haven't equalled.

I was doing woodwork & carpentry before New Yankee Workshop and of course I continue doing it after his show ended. But I can say my work has been influenced for the better because of Norm.

If you read all these commnets Norm I hope you know that there are many out here that appreciate you and all that you have contributed. Thank you & all the best
Rob Drummond
Hillsboro, NH
Posted: 12:06 pm on December 7th

edwardlloyd edwardlloyd writes: You inspired me years ago to do something about my wood working skills to such an extent that I took early retirement from my full time job; signed up for a years course at the Chippendale School in Scotland and have been happily making furniture for the past 6 years. I find much joy and pride any time I complete a piece for a customer, my family or for my own home and I owe it all to you Norm - you'll be missed.
Best wished for the future.
Ed Lloyd - Banchory, Scotland
Posted: 4:37 pm on November 16th

Skinny47 Skinny47 writes: As a pharmacist nearing retirement I'm sad too see you leave the workshop, but I like the idea of you doing what you really want to do. I worry about all the young guys and gals who will miss out on you great experience and teaching ability. Maybe it's time to library all the woodworking into complete libraries, for schools and colleges, etc..
Anyway, all the best to the best example we could have had all these years.
Posted: 8:46 pm on November 5th

dan172 dan172 writes: I missed Norm when he was in Austin,Tx, but I obtained some first generation cherry about 30years ago that was cut in cira 1939 ish, but the old german had it planed to 13/16 an it sat in his barn until I bought it after his death, about 900 bdf, some 14" heart wood of beautiful deep brown color that one dreams about. well I am getting old now and have many items from it and it is time to pass on the rest. I am more interested in a good home that money. Please pass to Norm if he would like to see some of it I can send a pix. If hes has a good use of some I will contribute it at only shipping. I have about 800 bdf left mostly 7-8" by 14 to 16 ft lengths. This is not a general offer to give it all away but from one old woodworker to another, its use is of great importance when it comes to a "cherry picken" lumber.
dreeve@austin.rr.com pleas pass to Norm
Posted: 10:38 am on November 5th

dan172 dan172 writes: I missed Norm when he was in Austin,Tx, but I obtained some first generation cherry about 30years ago that was cut in cira 1939 ish, but the old german had it planed to 13/16 an it sat in his barn until I bought it after his death, about 900 bdf, some 14" heart wood of beautiful deep brown color that one dreams about. well I am getting old now and have many items from it and it is time to pass on the rest. I am more interested in a good home that money. Please pass to Norm if he would like to see some of it I can send a pix. If hes has a good use of some I will contribute it at only shipping. I have about 800 bdf left mostly 7-8" by 14 to 16 ft lengths. This is not a general offer to give it all away but from one old woodworker to another, its use is of great importance when it comes to a "cherry picken" lumber.

Posted: 10:37 am on November 5th

Artform1 Artform1 writes: I think I speak for woodworkers everywhere when I say we will miss you, Norm. I have been watching The New Yankee Workshop and This Old House since before grade school. I am 31 now and own a cabinet shop in Florida where we practice many of the techniques you have taught many times over the years. I can honestly say that without your inspiration and creativity, I would not have traveled this path. Although we are sad to see you go, I understand completely your reasons for your descision, and applaud you for having such great and lasting success doing something you love for a living. I hope to possibly see some special appearances in the future or maybe even meet you one day. But until then, good luck and godspeed.
Posted: 7:24 pm on November 2nd

sego sego writes: Truly a woodworking educator. Norm shows us what is possible in woodwork and home building. I will miss those Saturday morning sessions in the New Yankee Shop, and in those Old Houses. I really hope to see a tv special once in a while.
Posted: 2:33 pm on November 1st

bsheriff bsheriff writes: Wow, twenty years of watching NYWS! Time sure has flown by. Thanks Norm for your in depth teaching. You have inspired a whole generation or two of woodworkers. I am going to miss my Saturday morning ritual of PBS woodworking shows. But, taking time for yourself is always a good thing. We all watched your skills develop as we honed ours. But...there will always be the reruns and dvd episodes. Thanks Norm...Thanks.
Posted: 3:43 pm on October 31st

bikerclimber bikerclimber writes: Norm, You have inspired me and improved the quality of my life, in addition to making me a much better woodworker. I saw note about your retirement and looked around my house,with all the "Norm" projects and realized how much influence you have had on my family's life. And then I realized how many homes there are that can also say the same thing. You've been a heck of a force for good, and to help us realize what we can do ourselves. Thanks!
Posted: 3:18 pm on October 31st

kfb kfb writes: I'm going to miss the NYWS very much, as this was my Sat. AM relaxation most every week. I enjoyed the techniques and procedures Norm used; which I applied while doing my own projects. I'd like to take this opportunity to wish Norm the very best in the years to come--Thank you...
Posted: 2:45 pm on October 31st

hammerhead41 hammerhead41 writes: There is now a void in my life. Thanks, Norm for all your
help in the last 20 years. You have helped to increase my
ability as a woodwooker and made woodworking a relaxing way
to get away from the every day hustle. I have your tall
chest in my bedroom and several other pieces through out the
house. Now working on kithcen cabinets.

Will miss you.
Posted: 10:32 am on October 31st

red_wood red_wood writes: Uugghhh!! Gonna miss you Norm and the NYW. Saturdays just won't be the same. When I was a kid, I so looked forward to the Saturday morning cartoons. I'm way beyond that now, of course, but would get that same exhilaration on Saturdays again, only this time watching your program along with This Old House. My dad was a carpenter his whole carreer. His was never really steady so I didn't follow in his footsteps. But I loved remodelling and working with wood, and stil do. Only wish I could've done more. I remember helping my dad out some in his garage/shop. Those are some great memories. My dad taught me much and so did you Norm. Good luck to you and God Bless.
Posted: 12:04 am on October 31st

happyhoosier happyhoosier writes: Like everyone else I am sad to see Norm hang it up. Although I never met him, I understand that he is the exception to the rule that nice guys finish last.
I learned a lot of techniques from NYW, but probably just as important I learned the pleasure of working with my hands. You only had to look at Norm to realize that he derived deep satisfaction from his craft. That inspired me (and many others, I am sure) to take up woodworking as a hobby.
Posted: 10:49 pm on October 30th

joe4liberty joe4liberty writes:
Shortly after I graduated from High School ('82) I began watching Norm and the NYW. If asked who my favorite teacher was, each of you here know the answer. Here in Colorado we have two different PBS stations, and the NYW is on Sat AND Sun on the two different channels - yeah! At exactly 4:00 pm, on Sat (11:00 am on Sunday) the saw stops running, and sawdust covered or not, I am seated in the living room for this week's lesson (the wife has given up scolding me for tracking the sawdust in each week - thanks mainly due to the furniture that she has gotten over the years because of Norm's lessons).
For a couple of decades now, I have watched the show, and thought "okay, I don't own that tool, how can I make another tool do the same job", so to RUSHISALIAR, all that I can say is this; the knowledge that Norm gave me, along with a cheap radial arm saw, and some old family hand tools, I managed to build a half dozen of Norm's projects and a couple dozen other projects. Remember, it is the poor craftsman who blames his tools (or lack thereof) for his inability. I am a woodworker today because of Norm's inspiration. For that, I thank you Norm!

Posted: 6:31 pm on October 30th

The Artful Codger The Artful Codger writes: Many years ago, when I was a mechanical engineer designing dredge pumps and rock crushers, I stumbled on a copy of Fine Woodworking and opened it to an article on how to make a newel post. I knew that that was the kind of woodworking I wanted to do. I still remember the images and description of the intricate joinery and never lost that inspiration. Watching Norm gave me the confidence to invest in good tools and keep learning. Now, the most recent things I've made are kitchen cabinets to replace those flooded by Hurricane Ivan and a set of barrister's bookcases for my granddaughter's college graduation. Thanks, Norm, for the confidence, and for many happy hours acquiring it and the skills.

Whe you see a banner ad, it's because the site sold that space, usually to Google, and the site has little if any control over what gets advertised. It's not an editorial statement by the site.

Lionel Robinson
Pensacola, FL
Posted: 12:51 pm on October 30th

rcbjr rcbjr writes: This is a very sad day in the woodworking world. A Sat. w/o Norm...unthinkable. Well, everybody has to move on to big and better. I have been watching Norm since 92 and have learned more about woodworking from him than any class I ever took. I have made countless pieces of Shake furniture from his programs/plans and can't even begin to mention all the expert techniques he taught me. One of the most important things I've learned is a saying I found many years ago, I cut it out and tapped it to my drill press, it's still there today.
"Don't think expensive equipment will make up for the lack of talent or practice". Norm practices that in every show.
Well. Norm, thank you and good luck, I will be watching TOH faithfully.
It has been an honor and a pleasure to learn from you. I will pass your teachings on to my children.
Richard
Posted: 12:35 pm on October 30th

hamiltonjr58 hamiltonjr58 writes: When I was a oung man, My new father-in-law used to build rudimentary shelves and chests out of plywood and made them look good. I started to emulate him and discovered this regular guy on TV that made beautiful furniture look easy. My father-in-law was my biggest critic and admirer and, I'm sad to say is no longer with us. Norm, you have been the biggest influence on my woodworking and now most furniture I own is my own construction and will last for years as will my admiration for you and your work. You have truly enriched my life. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.
Posted: 12:21 pm on October 30th

T.D. T.D. writes: I will truely miss the show. Norm's beginnings remind me of mine. I have fond memories working with my Dad at the lumberyard he owned with his brother and using the wood cut offs for heat in the wood stove.
Posted: 10:25 am on October 30th

Cleale Cleale writes: Nothing I could say would contribute to what's already been said, but my Saturday afternoons now have a big half-hour empty spot in them. All is not lost, however, as I'll gain 30 minutes woodworking time. Please come back in another iteration.
rmc3
Posted: 6:55 pm on October 29th

RogerBall RogerBall writes: I cant say much more than that allready said by people before me. I have never been a person who rushes to meet the Famous. However when you visited England and came to Exeter I had to meet you and say "thank you", for all you have taught me.
I would like to say it again, from the bottom of my heart,"Thank you Norm, for everything you have taught me over the years. I am glad I have all the shows and can watch them in the future. Have a realy great retirement. Fair Winds and Following Seas".
Posted: 5:49 pm on October 29th

epopewood epopewood writes: The ad I am referring to is a banner at the top of the Norm Abram article on this page, where there are usually tool ads. It appears on the top of other pages as well. Keep politics and homophobia out of woodworking.
Posted: 5:27 pm on October 29th

TurnII TurnII writes: Norm,

I can't begin to tell you all the things I have learned from you. It goes without saying a good portion of my woodworking knowledge can be traced back to watching New Yankee. But in addition to that some of your working thought processes have become part of my every day thinking.

We're going to really miss you and the program. I hope something changes and there is a announcement that you are returning to TV with a new program of your own.

Thanks again. All the best Norm.
Posted: 1:32 pm on October 29th

jsteve846 jsteve846 writes: I am so sorry to hear that Norm is hanging it up. Many years ago, when I was still learning how to maintain a house and to do rudimentary, I watched constantly hoping to pick up that one skill or that one trick to make my skills more complete. this led to my desire to build some basic cabinet making and finer woodworking skills. From the time I built my first big base cabinet out of particle board with a Formica top with some basic tools, I knew I was hooked. (I still use this twelve foot long cabinet in my current workshop). I now have a thousand square foot workshop with thousands of dollars worth of tools. I still watch Norm every week hoping that, at least by osmosis, I can pick up some more of his skills. I only curse him occasionally when I get in a row with my wife over my absolute need for the next handy tool, but I curse him in jest. I only wish my skills were better. Every time I watch him construct an intricate joint and he says "let's see how this fits" and it always fits perfectly, I say to whoever is around "Of course it fits perfectly--it always does for Norm. Norm, may every thing you do for the rest of your life meld perfectly.
Posted: 1:17 pm on October 29th

jsteve846 jsteve846 writes: I am so sorry to hear that Norm is hanging it up. Many years ago, when I was still learning how to maintain a house and to do rudimentary, I watched constantly hoping to pick up that one skill or that one trick to make my skills more complete. this led to my desire to build some basic cabinet making and finer woodworking skills. From the time I built my first big base cabinet out of particle board with a Formica top with some basic tools, I knew I was hooked. (I still use this twelve foot long cabinet in my current workshop). I now have a thousand square foot workshop with thousands of dollars worth of tools. I still watch Norm every week hoping that, at least by osmosis, I can pick up some more of his skills. I only curse him occasionally when I get in a row with my wife over my absolute need for the next handy tool, but I curse him in jest. I only wish my skills were better. Every time I watch him construct an intricate joint and he says "let's see how this fits" and it always fits perfectly, I say to whoever is around "Of course it fits perfectly--it always does for Norm. Norm, may every thing you do for the rest of your life meld perfectly.
Posted: 1:16 pm on October 29th

Pinseeker Pinseeker writes: From the bottom of my heart Norm, thank you for the years of wwonderful television.
Posted: 1:03 pm on October 29th

TBMS TBMS writes: I just read the recent comment from epopewood regarding the Stand for Marriage Maine advertisements. I was wondering what specific advertisement this person was referring to. Is it an ad in FWW? If so, could you please refer me to that issue? Thanks very much.
Posted: 12:49 pm on October 29th

1948Peter 1948Peter writes: Thanks Norm, There's one thing you taughtproblem me do not give up on your project, if you have a p problem sit back look at it. It will come to you. Thanks you helped me a lot. Peter Rivara I will mis you
Posted: 11:31 am on October 29th

epopewood epopewood writes: I am a woodworker in Maine and I am outraged by your Stand for Marriage Maine ads. It is positively irresponsible for a Connecticut based woodworking magazine to take sides and pander to political fear mongering. You should be ashamed of yourselves.
Posted: 11:19 am on October 29th

Billboy Billboy writes: Norm,

Thanks for all the wonderful years, Each week, I would schedule my Saturday's around your noon show. I learned a tremendous amount about woodworking,
tools, and the art of furniture from you and I am grateful for all you have done
to inspire me. Sorry the show had to end.

Bill
Posted: 11:07 am on October 29th

Billboy Billboy writes: In response to the comment by RUSHISALIAR :Perhaps Norm will now have some time to really learn the art of furniture making and can come back with a show that can relate to the average home woodworker who does not have a spare 50 grand to spend on a home workshop. Great things can be produced with simple hand tools that the average person can afford.

Just wondering what channel your woodworking show comes on?

I hope you will do for woodworking and furniture what Norm has done.

You're the reason I don't belong to furniture or woodworking clubs.
Posted: 11:00 am on October 29th

bubbadovetail bubbadovetail writes: I am very thankful to see that Norm is well and happy I was concerned that he might be ill. I like the vast majority of you fellow woodworkers have been watching and inspired by Norm since the begning and up until my life threatning and changing injury enjoyed building Norm's projects. Some of my favorits that are cherished around here are "The Lowboy", "The Queen Anne Bonett Top Highboy" and "Martha's Candle Stand" to name a few these projects were build using Norm's plans by my teen sons that did the vast majority of the work on them. The boy's would rather watch Norm on Saturadys than cartoons or some other program with out any useful information at all. The oldest one has set out to become a profesional woodworker thanks to Norm, he did his final project in shop class about Norm and the projects he was inspired to build because of Norm, and am proud to say that next year he will be attending the College Of The Redwoods to make his dream a reality thanks Norm I wonder if you realy realize how much positive influance you have had on the youth not only in the USA but around the globe. Thank's for the many years of insperation, mentoring and entertainment and we hope to see ya again. jb


Posted: 10:59 am on October 29th

dswcpa dswcpa writes: My wife was a shopahalic so every saturday morning we had to go to town to get what we needed and what we didn't need but by three in the afternoon we were heading home to catch Norm on Public TV even if I had to go 90 MPH to get there in time. After we got a VCR the race was over. I learned so much I can't thank him enough. I still have all my fingers by the way. I taped all of the episodes after I got the VCR and I still play them. Thanks Norm.
Posted: 10:47 am on October 29th

kenerv1 kenerv1 writes: Thank you Norm. When I first saw Norm working, those many short years ago, I thought "he is more carpenter than woodworker." Then he became the woodworker's woodworker. If there is a TV owning or book reading woodworker who has not learned from Norm I would like to meet him. Most important though, is the feeling he gives, that if you did walk into his shop with a question, you would be welcome and you would get a serious answer. I regret I never had the opportunity to prove that theory.

Thank you Norm.


Posted: 10:15 am on October 29th

rushisaliar rushisaliar writes: Perhaps Norm will now have some time to really learn the art of furniture making and can come back with a show that can relate to the average home woodworker who does not have a spare 50 grand to spend on a home workshop. Great things can be produced with simple hand tools that the average person can afford.
Posted: 10:09 am on October 29th

jmore99 jmore99 writes: Norm was incredible the past 30 years. And if he so chose, we would all watch him for amn additional 30 years. He showed us we had so much to learn and inspired us to want to learn different facets of the woodworking craft.

He inspired my father to begin his own woodworking crafts. Now everything in the 2 car garage has to do with lathes and woodturning. He eventually inspired me to begin my own woodworking endeavors. Although I am an intermediate, and want to be more of a furniture maker, it's given my father and me another special connection. For that Norm, I will be forever grateful. Thank you.
Posted: 9:59 am on October 29th

harpmakerGA harpmakerGA writes: Norm's love of the craft and his eagerness to share it with us all has inspired me to continue improving my woodworking skills and take on projects I didn't think I could do. Though the show has ended, I forward to seeing him on TOH and whatever else he takes on. Let's celebrate Norm's great accomplishment of being on the air for 21 years, sharing his joy of working with wood and the encouragement the show gave us to try new techiques and projects.
Norm, Rock on!
Posted: 9:17 am on October 29th

harpmakerGA harpmakerGA writes: Norm's love of the craft and his eagerness to share it with us all has inspired me to continue improving my woodworking skills and take on projects I didn't think I could do. Though the show has ended, I forward to seeing him on TOH and whatever else he takes on. Let's celebrate Norm's great accomplishment of being on the air for 21 years, sharing his joy of working with wood and the encouragement the show gave us to try new techiques and projects.
Norm, Rock on!
Posted: 9:17 am on October 29th

tfmdam tfmdam writes: What can you say about Norm, Sundays won't be the same. I've watched Norm and taped early TOH series since it's inception. Norm would use the latest in technology yet still teaching hand craftmanship. Norm felt he was not a master carpenter, that distinction was given to him by Russell Morash, but the 30 years I've watched him and his cohorts, he is truly a master carpenter. Thanks Norm, you will be truly missed.
Posted: 9:12 am on October 29th

mytho1967 mytho1967 writes: As a novice woodworker I can not help but wonder if Norm really understands how he became the star he is today. Norm has single handedly shown the average guy/gal that woodworking is fun and that those mysterious skills can be achieved by mere mortals. The name Norm Abrams is synonymous with woodworking. Thank you Norm for all that you have done for me and my fellow woodworkers. You are a gentleman and mentor to so many people. Your skills as an instructor and your message will live well beyond the NYW. I wish you well in your future endeavors and look forward to hearing of your next project.
Posted: 9:05 am on October 29th

Hiramb Hiramb writes: When I first got satellite television the first show I always watched was NYW. This inspired me to become a better craftsman,I now build Windsor chairs and I'm in the process of restoring a 18Th century grist/ sawmill. Thanks for the inspiration. Norm if your looking for a job the mill still needs some TLC! All the best in your next project.
M Lowes Cavan On.
Posted: 8:51 am on October 29th

Hiramb Hiramb writes: When I first got satellite television the first show I always watched was NYW. This inspired me to become a better craftsman,I now build Windsor chairs and I'm in the process of restoring a 18Th century grist/ sawmill. Thanks for the inspiration. Norm if your looking for a job the mill still needs some TLC! All the best in your next project.
M Lowes Cavan On.
Posted: 8:45 am on October 29th

Hiramb Hiramb writes: When I first got satellite television the first show I always watched was NYW. This inspired me to become a better craftsman,I now build Windsor chairs and I'm in the process of restoring a 18Th century grist/ sawmill. Thanks for the inspiration. Norm if your looking for a job the mill still needs some TLC! All the best in your next project.
M Lowes Cavan On.
Posted: 8:24 am on October 29th

Hiramb Hiramb writes: When I first got satalite telivision the first show I always watched was NYW. This inspired me to become a better craftsman,I now build Windsor chairs and I'm in the process of restoring a 18th century grist/ sawmill. Thanks for the insperation. Norm if your looking for a job the mill still needs some TLC! All the best in your next project.
M Lowes Cavan On.
Posted: 8:15 am on October 29th

ukfan ukfan writes: I was lucky, I found TOH when it first started and it gave me the confidence to build my own house in 1986. After that I watched NYWS from it's beginning. I never thought about building furniture until my wife brought home a tablesaw one Father's Day and told me I should start doing what I watch Norm doing each week. I have since built my second home along with a detached woodworking shop. I couldn't have done it without the lessons I learned and the confidence I gained from watching Norm. From a fan who was there at the beginning, thank you Norm for all you taught us. All the best we willl miss you.
Posted: 8:13 am on October 29th

GrampaJoe GrampaJoe writes: Words really can't express the gratitude that so many owe to such a talented, educated man who shared his creative gifts with a most grateful audience. So many of us wahted to learn how, Norm obliged us and showed us how. I am so thankful for the confidence he instilled in me as we transformed an small old 150 year old farm house that was on its last legs into a huge confortable home with bedrooms for each of our 4 kids. We replaced foundations and all of that dirty back breking stuff. Norm showed you how. 10 years later we decided to build a 30' by 42' 4 car garage. Mama really appreciates that in our snowy and icy winters in upstate Cameron Mills,New York. He showed you how and you followed his insructions and nothing creative was beyond your reach. At 78 I'm still building porches, turning spindles, making vanities,kitchen cabinets, tall grandfather clocks and have expanded into wood carving. Yet not a single project begins without utilizing the skills we learned from Norm, a true Master Carpenter and tutor. I remember making single wide drawer craft table for my daughter modifying a 5 drawer dressing table from the Vander Built Estate that Norm copied. She had seen the original and loved the one she had asked for. Then again Norm was always one for innovation a creative modification and made it look so easy. He shared his gift and talents with so many and I was one of the many fortunate ones to have enjoyed him till today. We will miss him and would like to say thanks so very much to a most generous, humble, kind and caring teacher. You are truly, THE GREATEST.
We will miss you.
Grampa Joe Pero ( I really should say great grampa Joe, 5 times over)
Posted: 1:09 am on October 29th

phicarpentry phicarpentry writes: I grew up as a young man watching "Norm". I idolized him for his abilities. He has inspired me to be a woodworker more than any other person. I will someday be a master carpenter like Norm. Thank you for all you have taught me , and for the things that you will teach me when I find them.

So hang up your NYW hat, or "tack it in place...with a couple of brads" and enjoy what you have become. Thanks
Posted: 12:08 am on October 29th

nickfullerton nickfullerton writes: Norm Abrams has always been the ultimate woodworker. He's "the man". I wish I had every state of the art tool known to mankind like he does in his shop. Us poor groveling unknowns will just have to struggle on without his meticulous leadership. Maybe he can come to Marin county and build a green home on my small plot of land in unincorporated Mill Valley, under the shadow of Mt. Tam, because I sure can't afford to yet.
Posted: 11:58 pm on October 28th

JoeBaxter.USN JoeBaxter.USN writes: For all of the 25 years that I served in the Navy I harbored the crazy idea that when I retired I would somehow take an apprenticeship under Norm and learn to be an artisan. So, I retire and Norm calls it quits. Sometimes life just isn't fair....
Posted: 10:20 pm on October 28th

Jimmyb55816 Jimmyb55816 writes: i have watched norm for so many years now it will be not the same with out him on the nyw, Norm had made me strive to do the best i can on all my projects, Thanks Norm, Hope to still see you at the AWF or the IWF;
Posted: 10:17 pm on October 28th

newyorknewyork newyorknewyork writes: They say good people leave ripples on the water of life, but Norm obviously your inspiration has created waves. Many people, myself amoung them, have gained confidence to.. well just work the wood and create. During those sleepless nights following 9/11, late night broadcasts of TNYW and TOH helped to bring a comfort during a very stressful time, thank you for that. I wish you well in your future endeavors and remember this as I do every time I cut a piece of wood, "measure twice, cut once". Thank you Norm.
P.S. Yes, the safety glasses have become the most important tool I have.
Posted: 10:15 pm on October 28th

Jimmyb55816 Jimmyb55816 writes: I do wood working seeing i am retired the other reason i do it is i have watched norm for so many years and it make me strive to do the best i can in all my projects. Good luck to you norm in what ever you do hope to see you at the AWFor the IWF.

Posted: 10:14 pm on October 28th

davidpugh3 davidpugh3 writes: Norm: You are the best. It's been great to get to know you and see what you can produce. I hope there is some other venue where we can see more. Best of luck with everything!
Posted: 10:07 pm on October 28th

grizz_man grizz_man writes: well here is the oppertunity to thank the man who inspire me to become active in wood working again so many years ago..thanks to norm i had the courage to build my own home from the ground up and my shop..i went from a small extra bedroom ..prob 8x10 to a nice seperate shop of 20x30...its stocked mostly with delta tools and ive been making furniture now for over 15 years.....everything in my home except for the upholstry is made by me and i continue to make things for others.....thank you so much norm for a wonderful show to watch and teaching all of us to go forward with our desire to woodwork....enjoy your retirement...and i hope you continue to show yourself from time to time...grizzman.
Posted: 10:01 pm on October 28th

weasel1219 weasel1219 writes: I remember watching you on our PBS station many years ago.
I was amazed at the craftsmanship and dedication you gave your projects. I remember going out that day and buying my first circular saw and some other tools. That did it for me I got hooked on woodworking. Now I am into turning wood, mainly pens, and working with exotic woods. I have nothing but respect and admiration for some one who is able to teach the way that you have tought people through out the States.
I wish you the best the in your endeavors.
Thanks again for best craft in the world.
Good Luck
Posted: 9:26 pm on October 28th

NM_Woodworker NM_Woodworker writes: Thanks Norm,

You definitely are a great teacher and reason I took up woodworking.

And Yes, I do "remember this: there is no more important safety rule than to wear these — safety glasses."

Thanks Again Norm,
Greg in New Mexico
Posted: 9:12 pm on October 28th

nrosas nrosas writes: Norm,
You got me started in woodworking. My first project was your Shaker stepstool almost 25 years ago. It's still in use in the kitchen. I've built many of your projects (some more succesfully than others) and your workbench is still at the center of my shop. Thanks for the inspiration and best wishes gor the future.
Posted: 9:09 pm on October 28th

samarafc samarafc writes: Yes to all comments. Although my printed issue is packed away so it cannot be date referenced. The first time Norm appeared on the cover of Fine Woodworking the following months in "the letters" was a list of people who cancelled their subscriptions because of Norm being on the cover. My how we have matured. I am sure the editors are smiling quietly to themselves knowing their foresight. Thanks to FINE WOODWORKING and to NORM.
Rich
Posted: 8:05 pm on October 28th

Gene1 Gene1 writes: I have enjoyed the new yankee workshop for many many years and often wondered what Norm did in his off time. Its clear that he loves the woodcraft profession and has inspired millions of viewers. Thank You, for the years of enjoyment and the craftsmanship you have inspired in all of us fellow woodworkers. Hopefully he may do some speaking dates around the country. Wishing you a very long and healthy future.
Posted: 7:51 pm on October 28th

wpuvy wpuvy writes: Has anyone spoken for all those great tools, yet? :-)
You will be missed! I've enjoyed NYW for many years since those early seasons 20+ years ago. Hope those reruns keep airing, for I'm sure I've missed a few. Thanks for all the inspiration (and let me know about those tools!)
Posted: 7:30 pm on October 28th

rotorhead rotorhead writes: Norm:
As a teaching assistant at Palomar College here in San Diego, you have been an inspiration for many of our students,and many of us. I only hope you begin to share all your experience again with all of us. We would love to see at our school. Many thanks for sharing the benefits of sawdust therapy with the world.
Posted: 7:23 pm on October 28th

woodworkerplus woodworkerplus writes: Jim Brokenbourgh
Norm and Russell You changed my life I got hooked way back when BV was the host of this old house I always had the feeling that he was more of a host than an expert. I then started watching The New Yankee workshop I soon started gathering tools for my shop and a year or so latter went into the contracting business, This scared the daylights out of my wife who would always say have you done this before and of course the answer was No. With the help of this old house ,The New Yankee workshop and Fine Homebuilding and Fine Woodworking plus a great number of Taunton press books I was self taught with all the experts on the shows and magazines and books. I'm now a 20 year contractor and own my own furniture/cabinet shop. I'm sorry to see your show end but thank you all for all the help and entertainment through the years.
Posted: 7:12 pm on October 28th

waynebeard waynebeard writes: Best wishes in your next endeavors..... You will be sorely missed
Posted: 7:01 pm on October 28th

mikeniner mikeniner writes: At one time I could boast I had 20 years of NYW recorded in my library for woodworking. Thanks for a wonderful education and creation of safe work habits in the shop.
Lamello,Delta Tools and all the other sponsers are losing the best spokesman for woodworking they ever had.
Thanks again
Mike Flanagan
Posted: 7:00 pm on October 28th

Rocketman128 Rocketman128 writes: Norm,

I meet you over 10 years ago at the Western Cable Show out side LA. You where in the HGTV booth signing copies of your new book "Measure Twice, Cut Once". We where all laughing and haveing a good time with possible quotes you could put in the cover of our books, like "Wendy, let Bob buy more tools". You wrote in my book, "Biscuits, aint just for eating, Norm". Thanks for all the years, great memories, and endless projects.

Bob

PS. Wendy let me buy the tools, now I need a bigger shop!
Posted: 6:50 pm on October 28th

yosurijoe yosurijoe writes: I have been watching norm on This Old House and New Yankee Workshop for as long as I can remember.

One of the Old Houses series was done in Savanaha Georgia and as a result of watching them reconstuct some of the plaster moldings, I was able to repair the plaster crown molding in a house my daughter bought 7 years ago.

With the request of my daughter to build radiator covers for that house and what I had learn watching Norm, I now have a great hobby in woodworking.

I have been fortunate to buld some very nice pieces for some of my friends as well as for my wife. Now that we are relocated in Florida and I'm finishing my own version of the Workshop Hutch, I'll be able to continue building cabinets and furniture for my wife, family, and friends.

Thanks Norm for your inspiration to me and countless others. Best of luck in all your future endeavors. May you have a long, healthy, and wonderful life ahead.
Posted: 6:43 pm on October 28th

ianstaley ianstaley writes: Hey Norm, let me tell you from the OLD country, I am now 58, disabled and my working life is at an end, however, I woke up early one morning in pain several years ago now, so I made a cup of English tea, switch on the TV, nothing on to tried a bit of zapping, I came across a program called the NEW YANKEE WORKSHOP it was at 5 o clock in the morning on Discovery channel. FROM that day onwards I never missed a program, I was up every day at 5 AM to watch this amazing carpenter and avidly enjoyed the projects that y6ou did on that program. I was also an avid watcher of this old house; if Norm Abram was on the tube I would watch , I didn't care how early or late, I would watch. I would like to thank you so much to introducing me to the beauty of wood, the love of working it and the pleasure of using what I make, you gave me a reason to continue and believe that maybe my useful life wasn't over after all, I am absolutely certain that you will be missed by millions of viewers. Thanks Norm, for giving me something to do with what remains of my life. May you enjoy yours forever. Ian Staley, from the UK
Posted: 6:35 pm on October 28th

gold3720 gold3720 writes: New Yankee is on here in New Orleans at 7:30am on Saturday mornings(WYES-pbs). Care to guess how many Saturday mornings that I didn'g get to sleep late? A hot cup of coffee and Norm got me started on my weekends for many, many years. I'm so used to this time that I probably will never sleep late on Saturdays any more. Norm, you will be missed but will be forever remembered and appreciated. Thank you----Ron
Posted: 6:21 pm on October 28th

woodchucktom woodchucktom writes: I have watched almost every weekend both This Old House and New Yankee Workshop and have been inspired to put my skills to work by Norm. His talent as a craftsman and a earthy person on TV has made many of follow his techniques even when we questioned our ability. He will really be missed and I want him to know how I have appreciated his presence and talent that he shared with us all. Good fortune in all he persues!
Posted: 6:19 pm on October 28th

slowlearner slowlearner writes: I've made maybe twenty of Norm's New Yankee Workshop projects and bought many of the tools he demonstrated.
He is the major reason why I got into, and enjoy, woodworking so much. There should be a Nobel prize for woodworking. At the least the president should award him the Medal of Freedom for all he's done.
Posted: 6:19 pm on October 28th

gmoney gmoney writes: I like seeing and listening to Norm. That said, a monopod or tripod would really help the video a lot. Thanks for posting.
Posted: 6:15 pm on October 28th

tsailordog tsailordog writes: Norm, I have watched your shows for years. I learned a lot and even convinced my wife that tools are a good investment. It must have worked as we have built a house and a cottage. If you think that retirement will see you with more time to yourself for your own projects, I hate to break it to you that it does not work that way. Enjoy your new life. You deserve it.
Posted: 5:52 pm on October 28th

Dekester Dekester writes: I wish Norm all the best and he deserves to relax. However, I have an idea for a show. Norm (or David Marks) goes to a woodworker's shop and using only the tools available to that particular woodworker, goes through a particular project. Of course I would volunteer to be the test subject!

Seriously, Norm has paid his dues and helped so many. I only hope someone else comes along and picks up the mantle.
Posted: 5:33 pm on October 28th

Tarponjpm Tarponjpm writes: I only wish my father were alive to enjoy what Norm has brought to all of us over the years. My father also was a master carpenter. Only after his death did I realize what a void in learning I would have. When Norm popped on the scene it was a great revelation, after watching a few episodes I then knew I had a new mentor. Thanks for all that you taught us Norm!!
Posted: 5:28 pm on October 28th

stevegiamundo stevegiamundo writes: Your article on Norm moves me to write and express my appreciation for the Show,its staff and sponsors, and of course the man himself, who over 30 years, taught me the values of planning and patience; the two attributes I appreciate more than any tool I own... because every tool I own works better because of Norm.

If I could speak directly to him, I would offer my best wishes for continued good health and success, and my thanks for sharing so much, for so long, so consistently.

You will be missed!

Posted: 5:09 pm on October 28th

stevegiamundo stevegiamundo writes: Your article on Norm moves me to write and express my appreciation for the Show,its staff and sponsors, and of course the man himself, who over 30 years, taught me the values of planning and patience; the two attributes I appreciate more than any tool I own... because every tool I own works better because of Norm.

If I could speak directly to him, I would offer my best wishes for continued good health and success, and my thanks for sharing so much, for so long, so consistently.

You will be missed!

Posted: 5:09 pm on October 28th

bounty4 bounty4 writes: Norm, You have effected so many lives and given true meaning to wood crafting to so many. We thank you.

Posted: 4:57 pm on October 28th

Jackh1937 Jackh1937 writes: Norm inspired me to do more wood working projects. Because of him I traded my old table saw for a new cabinet saw. I purchased floor model drill press, large thickness planer, drum sander, larger jointer and many more modern tools. I made many of Norm's earlyest projects and improved as the years went along. I never miss a show on PBS and tape many to watch over and over. My wife says that if it were not for Norm I would have driven her crazy. When I need to get away I go in my garage and make saw dust. I have 4 daughters and 8 grandkids and have made beds and dressers for all of them over the years. I got to a point that because of Norm there was never a project that I knew I couldn't do and do well. I will misss Norm but, he will always be my hero. Norm you deserve a rest. May you find peace in your days to come.
Posted: 4:52 pm on October 28th

luthier luthier writes: Thank you Norm for all you have shared over the years. My husband and I were eventually inspired to remodel a house and take on many projects because of your quality example and can do teaching starting back in the This Old House series. Your style is iconic and your love of doing it right comes through all the time. I often imagine that your father told you some of the same comments you share with us. You seem to have woodworking in your bones! I have over 30 years of woodworking experience and still learn tips from watching the New Yankee Workshop! Best of luck in your effort at retirement - I'm guessing it will be a busy one! Try to keep us posted please!
Posted: 4:42 pm on October 28th

phzuidema phzuidema writes: Norm has been an inspiration for my workbench perspiration. It has been a joy and life expanding to watch Norm at the Workshop all these years. The New Yankee Workshop developed my knowledge, skills, understanding and appreciation for the craft. I have only built one of his projects, two mesquite bookcases. However, I have reused his techniques and morphed many of his projects in to ones that suited my needs more directly. Norm, you have touched more lives than you will ever know.
Here's a suggestion for a signature sign-off show. Spend a final episode, talking to your audience, similar to the video of your presentation at the Old Sturbridge Village... just a discussion of how you got here (the Workshop), why it was important to you, and how you feel about moving in to the next phase of your life. Maybe play some bloopers or anecdotes about funny things that happened over the years. Maybe even some things that didn't turn out. Talk to us about how the show grew you, like it grew us. Introduce some of your key people, in person, that we have seen on the credits for many years; and possibly, some selected guests, viewers, and maybe some others that were a motivation for you.
Please allow me to submit one more suggestion. Twice a year do an iconic one hour show for PBS that will do a new project. Make it a special during Pledge week. I'll be watching.

Thank you for all your years of gifts to us.
Posted: 4:38 pm on October 28th

woodman711 woodman711 writes: My bedroom is now furnished with several of your projects from your books and series. Without your talents I never would have learned "how-to". I have built the six over six Shaker tall chest, end tables, and two cedar chests. Thank you so very much for taking that leap of faith so many years ago. I will leave you with my favorite quote that may help you in your new choices in life..." with courage greater than your fear, jump into the unknown and you will fly". I hope some day to meet you and shake your hand. God bless!
Posted: 4:10 pm on October 28th

seventy_five seventy_five writes: For me the NYWS has always been about technique. It has allowed me to do things that I would not have tried before I started watching the show. Although I have ordered a couple of project plans and bought evey one of his books, I have never built any of the projects on the show. But I would like to believe that every piece of furniture that I have built has been built the way Norm would have done it.
Posted: 3:44 pm on October 28th

bburen bburen writes: Thanks Norm,

You started my love for woodworking!! You will be greatly missed! I looked forward to PBS on saturday mornings for the past 15 yrs. I only wish I would have known about the show in 1988 when it began. You really are a truely genuine and respectly guy that I wish I could have spent just one day working with you in the workshop.

Thank you for all you have done for me and millions of other fans. I am proud to same I'm a NORMITE. I wish you a long and happy semi retirement.

Bruce
Posted: 3:21 pm on October 28th

robertanthony robertanthony writes: In his comments at Old Sturbridge, Norm mentioned the term "respect." I think it reflects Norm's approach to both his projects and his audiences, his respect for the wood he worked and the folks he informed. And I, too, am a proud member of the "Order of the Plaid." Thanks Norm!
Posted: 3:06 pm on October 28th

Rockysstuff Rockysstuff writes: Norm,
I love to watch work happen and your shows are the best!
It is like watching my alter-ego out there in the sun or the snow or in that beautiful workshop. Thank you for the inspiration you have been to so many of us wannabe carpenter/woodworkers.

I wish you the best, Mark Stone
Posted: 2:56 pm on October 28th

traveler543 traveler543 writes: Sorry to see you leave Norm, but you have given me more ideas in wood working. I want to wish you well in what you do and like me being retired you deserve a retirementI hope you do build the green house and share with us in doing so.
Posted: 2:32 pm on October 28th

2bob21 2bob21 writes: I have watched Norm since he started on The New Yankee Workshop and am sad to see him go. I have always been a small wood worker but Norm pushed me over the edge. I am now retired and Make folding Adirondack chairs and paint large flowers on the back and flower tables to match, rustic furniture and my wife and I travel all over Michigan going to craft shows. On Sat I couldn't wait untill Norm Came on.
Thanks Norm for all the tricks and help you gave me, and the extra income helps out the Social Security check. Bob
Posted: 2:09 pm on October 28th

ksdj1 ksdj1 writes: Please Norm, get started on your home workshop, and please equip it with lights, cameras, and audio. Never forget...the fan base is here. We will watch! I will even buy you a new flannel shirt! Name the color buddy!
Posted: 2:01 pm on October 28th

NovicePhil NovicePhil writes: I was there at OSV; it was great to see Norm in person after all these years. I had a question for him at the book signing. He took his time to give me the most informed answer he could. In the back of my head I was thinking "I am chatting with freak Norm Abram". It was so cool. I think we will see him again.

Thanks!!!

Posted: 2:00 pm on October 28th

Little_Joe Little_Joe writes: Well, I had just gone through a major medical problem and I needed to change the way I was living my life to get away from STRESS... I stumbled on The New Yankee Workshop on TV... WOW! What a cool program! I can learn something from this! I watched & recorded it whenever I could. From there, I started collecting some tools... started making small things... the cost of wood was not anticipated for my limited fixed income... what a BLOW! ... I collected wood on trash day whenever people were throwing perfectly good wood... a friend gave me his scraps... My first large project was a small kitchen island table unit... I used 2x4's, trimmed to look good, glued them together for the legs... pallet scraps for as much as I could... and I broke down and purchased some Poplar for what was needed to finish it... Norms tutoring got me through it! I now enjoy making small boxes, little things, as well as book cases & an entertainment center! I love to design, draw, and build what I want... I did buy the plan for the island!

I hope NYWS episodes will continue to be shown... even though I have seen them a few times, I STILL enjoy watching them to embed the techniques into my mind.

I've always wondered about one thing though... "and now a few pins to hold it while the glue dries."... after the glue dries, does he take them out? (big grin)

Norm, thanks a MILLION for your wonderful education! May the rest of your life be happy and fulfilled the way you want it! We look forward to seeing you again in future ventures you may decide to take.

Above all... Have FUN!

Thank you,
Joe Lyddon
www.woodworkstuff.net

Posted: 2:00 pm on October 28th

wleas wleas writes: I thought that Norm had already built his home workshop when he built his house a few years ago.
This gives hope to us NYWSP fans (Hopefully we'll be able to peek in once and awhile)who'll be expected to go "Cold Turkey" without our Saturday fix of Norm and his latest project/s!
If we know Norm (Like we think we do) HIS home workshop project will be one of the best.
Here's hoping Fine Woodworking will be invited by Norm to keep us informed (With plenty of pictures) of Norm's progress
in building his Own Home workshop. (That'll be a good read)
Posted: 1:56 pm on October 28th

B.L. Zeebub B.L. Zeebub writes: No matter where or when you entered woodworking you have to give a nod to this guy for opening up this world to so many of us. Yes, he's not necessarily a "fine" woodworker BUT his talent as a purveyor of Yankee ingenuity and gitterdun attitude is what we ALL need to see us through. And even though I might forgo the Leigh jig and router for a backsaw and a carefully scribed line, the end is still the same; a piece of work that I can be proud of AND that Norm convinced me I can do.

Thanks big guy. I for one look forward to the next chapter in your shared journey.

Till then...
Posted: 1:33 pm on October 28th

gowen22 gowen22 writes: An American icon that will be missed.
Where else will we be able to see and learn how to use the latest in power tools.
Also where do we go to find what is current in fannel designs?
All kidding aside, THANK YOU Norm for 21 years of entertainment.
Posted: 1:12 pm on October 28th

skip8200 skip8200 writes: Like so many others, I have been watching NYW so long that I cannot remember how long it's been. Norm has given my wife and I the confidence to do a major remodel on our first home then build our new home ourselves. We now have our own shop and have built our cabinets and furniture together. We ahve shared Saturday mornings with Norm that it's going to odd not to have that enjoyment and learning experence. Good luck and be safe Norm.
Posted: 1:11 pm on October 28th

skip8200 skip8200 writes: Like so many others, I have been watching NYW so long that I cannot remember how long it's been. Norm has given my wife and I the confidence to do a major remodel on our first home then build our new home ourselves. We now have our own shop and have built our cabinets and furniture together. We ahve shared Saturday mornings with Norm that it's going to odd not to have that enjoyment and learning experence. Good luck and be safe Norm.
Posted: 1:10 pm on October 28th

toolson toolson writes: His legacy is not the furniture he's made but the countless pieces we have made. We the once students of Norm.

My wife thanks you Norm.
Posted: 12:58 pm on October 28th

jroy jroy writes: Im stilled bummed out thinking about the end of NYW. I started watching TOH while in college and was fasinated by what Norm and his crew could do. I had never been exposed to home improvement (my father couldnt hold a screwdriver without directions), but watching Norm made me want to learn how...fast forward 25yrs and I am teaching shop class, have worked on construction crews during the summer and have built my own home. My three children love to watch their dad work on projects around the house and slowly and surely I have been breaking them in to the joys of carpentry.

and to think it all started by watching a man with a flannel shirt...
Posted: 12:23 pm on October 28th

ecarfar ecarfar writes: It really is an end of an era. We have two PBS stations here in NY, one in NJ and the other on Long Island where I live. The NJ station rid themselves of all workshop type DIY programming years ago. The LI station carried NYWS on Saturday mornings but it was never on on a consistant basis. I hope they decide to issue all thre NYWS series on DVD by season or as a complete set. I'd be the first in line to buy it.
Posted: 12:17 pm on October 28th

ecarfar ecarfar writes: It really is an end of an era. We have two PBS stations here in NY, one in NJ and the other on Long Island where I live. The NJ station rid themselves of all workshop type DIY programming years ago. The LI station carried NYWS on Saturday mornings but it was never on on a consistant basis. I hope they decide to issue all thre NYWS series on DVD by season or as a complete set. I'd be the first in line to buy it.
Posted: 12:16 pm on October 28th

ecarfar ecarfar writes: It really is an end of an era. We have two PBS stations here in NY, one in NJ and the other on Long Island where I live. The NJ station rid themselves of all workshop type DIY programming years ago. The LI station carried NYWS on Saturday mornings but it was never on on a consistant basis. I hope they decide to issue all thre NYWS series on DVD by season or as a complete set. I'd be the first in line to buy it.
Posted: 12:16 pm on October 28th

ecarfar ecarfar writes: It really is an end of an era. We have two PBS stations here in NY, one in NJ and the other on Long Island where I live. The NJ station rid themselves of all workshop type DIY programming years ago. The LI station carried NYWS on Saturday mornings but it was never on on a consistant basis. I hope they decide to issue all thre NYWS series on DVD by season or as a complete set. I'd be the first in line to buy it.
Posted: 12:15 pm on October 28th

discus82 discus82 writes: I will truly miss these shows. I only wish our local PBS station would have cooperated by showing more than just a handful of shows in the last decade. Their fundraising never seemed to show DIY shows. I think the makers of TOH, and The New Yankee Workshop should start selling complete season DVDs of these great shows to ease our pain. Good luck in all you do Norm.
Posted: 10:48 am on October 28th

dusty_84325 dusty_84325 writes: We owe Norm a lot of credit for the growth of furniture making and woodworking as a hobby. I credit Norm with popularizing our hobby like no one else has. His influence created a growing market enjoyed by machine and tool manufacturers, suppliers, and others. Actually, this market is something we all enjoy because we can get the tools and supplies we need at reasonable costs.

I suspect that without Norm's influence, our options for tools and machines would be expensive cabinet shop quality equipment, and supplies/hardware would be a chore to find.

I rarely got to see The New Yankee Workshop, myself. It is broadcast during the time it is my duty to open our Woodworkers' Club shop. I doubt that even our club - with its shared community shop (on par with Norm's)- would have been successful without his influence. Our members even refer to him as if he were a member of our club: "I saw Norm do it this way." would be a typical comment in our shop, and we all know who Norm is.

Thanks Norm; keep in touch.
Posted: 10:45 am on October 28th

K_ChipL K_ChipL writes: I would like to thank Mr. Abram for the many years of teaching and inspiring so many of us. I have never built any of the projects from the New Yankee Workshop but the projects have inspired many of my own designs. Thanks again Norm!
Posted: 10:00 am on October 27th

besamemucho5 besamemucho5 writes: i was inspired by him like alot of other people and i built some of the pieces that he built on the show, also i acquired some of the same tools that he has(like the shopsmith that sits in a corner of my shop colecting dust) .... being so involved in learning from him i never realized that there were alot of other "master woodworkers" i mean real master woodworkers out there... looking back at 20 years of norm's work i wonder if he ever built anything that required more skill than the stuff that he built in a weekly basis on his show....now that he is going to retired he will have the time to do so maybe....it seems to me that in terms of woodworking we are prety grown up and we can go the rest of the way by ourselves or maybe learning from other woodworkers ....i wish norm all the best.
Posted: 3:52 am on October 27th

tooch tooch writes: I learned from him, and I learned with him. From his earliest pieces, with a million nails to his latest and most sophisticated, he inspired many, many of us to try it, whether we thought we could do it or not. Maybe he'll hold a raffle for some of his shop equipment!
Posted: 9:17 pm on October 26th

RalphBarker RalphBarker writes: Good thinking, Ms. Roman. Norm deserves the pat on the plaid.
Posted: 7:34 pm on October 26th

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