The Editors Mailbox

The Editors Mailbox

The Editors Mailbox Has a New Home

comments (23) November 4th, 2008 in blogs

MBerger Matt Berger, contributor
thumbs up 14 users recommend

What photo illustrates a post about our new blog? How about a snapshot of the old Victorian in Newtown, Connecticut, that became the first new home to Fine Woodworking magazine in 1976. Read the back story.  - CLICK TO ENLARGE

What photo illustrates a post about our new blog? How about a snapshot of the old Victorian in Newtown, Connecticut, that became the first new home to Fine Woodworking magazine in 1976. Read the back story


Welcome to the new home of The Editors Mailbox, the house blog from the editors of Fine Woodworking where we report on news, reviews, how-to information, and entertaining stories from our travels around the woodworking world. We'll also use this blog to post answers to questions from readers on a variety of subjects.

Starting with this post, this page has become the new URL to visit for updates to The Editors Mailbox. And, if you are already a regular reader of our blog and subscribe to the RSS feed, you'll need to pick up our new feeds, which are available in a variety of formats. To browse our archive of posts, visit the old home of The Editors Mailbox here.

This new platform provides great new opportunities for us to share information and gather feedback from readers. Login in with your existing account (or start one) and you can create a public profile with a photo and personal statement. And you can post photos of your woodworking projects in our new Gallery.

Leave a comment below with questions or suggestions about our new site. We'd love to hear from you.



posted in: blogs


Comments (23)

Mike7 Mike7 writes: Hey Matt,

Any chance you will ever do a vidio workshop on Kaidan-dansu?

Mike
Posted: 9:17 pm on September 20th

dondbaww dondbaww writes: Hi

Totally agree with redryba below. The contact bar is a distraction, negatively affecting the impact of the page and only offers buttons that are in at least one other place on the page (sometimes three other places).

Possible solution - I can see why you want to encourage people to sign up or subscribe. It must be possible to remove the bar once you have signed in - when surely the purpose of the bar is achieved.

Thanks for Fine Woodworking

Don
Posted: 4:58 pm on May 8th

William John William John writes: Hi Good guy,
In furniture making where the veneered back is to be finished and seen, the flathead nails are left proud so the polishers may remove the back for even coating.
Most times the polishers will put the back on how they found it. Now and again the article will be delivered to the client
without the nails driven home.

William John
Posted: 10:13 am on May 5th

redruna redruna writes: Folks--the new "contact bar" set of subscription links at the bottom of many pages on the site is one of the most obnoxious changes you've made to the website.

On a laptop using Firefox, your "contact bar" now consumes almost 25% of the visible page height.

Please, please, please make the consarned thing GO AWAY!
Posted: 9:29 am on May 5th

2morweeks 2morweeks writes: I'm not sure if this is where my observation of "Tim Albers--Tool Test: Dovetail Jigs" belongs or not, as your organization of letters to the editor does not jive with what I'm used to.

In his article he tested the Akeda 16" dovetail jig stating if Akeda made a 24" they would be as good or better than the Leigh.

Akeda does make a 24" jig, and has for some time. I currently own one. I own one because I've used the Leigh and found that in no way did it come close to the Akeda in comparison. I spent a lot of time and money finding the best jig on the market, and found the Akeda superior to anything currently out there.

Just another observation from someone who makes a living from the use of these jigs, as opposed to someone who tests them for a living, and doesn't do his homework.
Posted: 1:36 pm on February 6th

StepTayl StepTayl writes: a dovetails videos is errantly connected. The link for Rogowski's dovetail layout subtilted ruler and a little math, runs his "practice dovetails" video.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/subscription/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=28147
Posted: 3:19 pm on December 29th

Jim_K52 Jim_K52 writes: Hello, I've bought several old Stanley planes in various condition. What is the correct bevel angle for Bailey and Bedrock planes, numbers 2 through 8? Thanks
Posted: 11:43 am on December 28th

jackmartin12 jackmartin12 writes: Hello from the frozen north -- winter has just started in for real here. I am interested in the Laquna 18 inch bandsaw;but, I am somewhat confused -- nothing new -- the machine is made in two different places. One of the bandsaws are made in ASIA and I have read blogs about shoddy workmanship concerning these saws? The complaints have been partially machined parts etc. The saw that is made in Italy ,on the other hand, has received raves about it's fit and finish -- it is talked about as an almost perfect machine. The price for the saws are in the range of 1000.00 difference? I am a strong believer; you only buy machinery once, so spend the money and get the best offered. What do you think; is the machine from Italy the answer? I am willing to spend more money for less headaches years down the line so any informed help would be much appreciated.
Thanks and all the best: Jack Martin, Winnipeg,Manitoba Canada
Posted: 11:47 am on November 7th

MountainWoodWorks MountainWoodWorks writes: If this note belongs elsewhere, please forward it or redirect me. I've been frustrated by the quality of the videos I access from the Finewoodworking.com online newsletter ovefr the past several weeks or longer. I had hoped to attach a couple of screen captures to better describe what I'm seeing (or not seeing), but that option doesn't seem to be available. Nearly every video I try to view here starts off normal, then as it proceeds, the picture becomes more and more "blurred" (not out of focus, but more like those thermal photos that show areas of hot and cold). It will "catch up" at times, then (just as I'm about to see something I'm really interested in seeing) it blurs again for several seconds or a minute. It seems to be a speed related problem, but my laptop is new, my wireless connection is fast, and most of all, I NEVER see this problem with videos from any other woodworking site. I might see pauses and re-starts on other sites, but I'd rather have that than not be able to see 50-75% of the video at all. Oh yes, everything is updated and properly setup including Adobe Flash. Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated. I'm beginning to doubt the value of by online subscription because of this problem. Thank you.


Posted: 1:26 pm on August 21st

goodguy goodguy writes: Why do some cabinet makers drive nails in only part-way?

In two videos here at FW, I see examples where expert cabinet makers (Phillip Lowe and Garrett Hack) attach cabinet backs with nails, but they do not drive these nails all the way in. Is this merely to allow disassembly or repair? Does it have something to do with seasonal wood-movement?

Since most of my background is in instrument-making, this is something I do not understand. Anyone who knows, I would appreciate an explanation.

Thanks.

Posted: 5:10 am on July 10th

goodguy goodguy writes: Why do some cabinet makers drive nails in only part-way?

In two videos here at FW, I see examples where expert cabinet makers (Phillip Lowe and Garrett Hack) attach cabinet backs with nails, but they do not drive these nails all the way in. Is this merely to allow disassembly or repair? Does it have something to do with seasonal wood-movement?

Since most of my background is in instrument-making, this is something I do not understand. Anyone who knows, I would appreciate an explanation.

Thanks.

Posted: 5:10 am on July 10th

Lobo Lobo writes: I just read your article on 123 finish and watched several videos on finishing. I use a modified Jeff Jewett poly finish. One part poly and one part paint thinner or turpentine or naptha. I usually apply it with a cloth, but I am sure it can be brushed or sprayed as well. It dries quick. I live in an arid area and usually can apply coats in 30 minute intervals.

James K. Walker
Posted: 10:30 pm on May 7th

Norman49 Norman49 writes: Does anyone have plans for building Hotel Tennessee style porch rocking chairs? Can't find anything on Fine Wood Working.
Posted: 1:16 am on April 14th

Hump Hump writes: I found that my saw table and blade were out of kilter by 5 thou in 7 inches (about 4/100 degrees). Is this normal, OK, or bad? Adjusting the table relative to the saw arbour will not be trivial.

I am at blairhumphrey1@gmail.com
Posted: 1:25 pm on March 11th

Grovey Grovey writes: Is there any up to date info on setting up a home spray booth? I have a dedicated finishing room (12w x 16l x 9h) but don't know what explosion proof fan or lights to get. Commercially made booths are thousands of dollars which I don't have. Any guidance? Brand, model and where to buy would be great!
Posted: 1:28 pm on January 15th

MacGregorWoodWorks MacGregorWoodWorks writes: In recent years I have seen the popularity of coffee tables, benches, conference tables, etc., with live edges. I would really like to see an article in FineWoodworking that addresses the use of these large slabs. How to flatten the top, leave or remove bark, and how to finish these rough edges. I do not not remember seeing this type of project in past issues. Thanks for considering this suggestion.

Dan MacGregor
Posted: 6:12 pm on December 12th

Gurusahay Gurusahay writes: I hope this where I post a question. If not, please forward...

We are remodeling our kitchen. My wife likes the look of flat doors with no framing for our cabinets. I've read many times that a flat panel, framed door is much better. My concern is that a flat door will warp or move too much. Our contractor is suggesting either flat panel, framed door or MDF with veneer. Is there a best joint to use for long lasting stability? We live in Atlanta, lots of humidity. Thanks for your suggestions.

Gurusahay
Posted: 8:10 am on December 4th

chowzoids1883 chowzoids1883 writes: This is very interesting with learning experience. This will help me more. Thank you for this.
Posted: 11:42 pm on July 23rd

nikejeff nikejeff writes: I really enjoy your videos. I am wondering if you will someday in the future have high def videos so that we can watch them in full screen mode with a sharper image?
Posted: 12:40 pm on March 25th

Taigert Taigert writes: Matt,
I know you are swamped with the upgrades going on right now. For a least three weeks I have been trying to download Garrett's Hand Plane Plane book. Each time I try I get a broken link. I haven't botherd complaining, figuring that you guys are aware of the problem and are working on getting it fixed. Now we don't even have access to the download. Could you please advise me what I have to do to get this book.
Thank You in Advance,
Taigert
Posted: 5:49 am on December 12th

rehabcat rehabcat writes: Tom Could Not Download The Handplane Book ???
Posted: 1:03 pm on December 2nd

oldfraz oldfraz writes: Recently completed a blanket chest from the plans of Peter Turner. Found a couple errors in the "cut list". Called for four stiles 1x1-1/2x10-1/4, should be six pieces.

Called for two Center Panels 1x10x13-1/2, shoud be 14-1/2.

Scale drawing of the top shows 16" wide, should be 16-1/2" to 17" minimum to cover the rim and allow for hinges.


Gary Frazier
Posted: 1:03 pm on August 30th

swik swik writes: This looks like an awsome book with lots to learn from. Sign me up for the give away.
Posted: 1:00 pm on April 17th

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