The Editors Mailbox

The Editors Mailbox

Book Giveaway: Furniture Restoration - Step-by-Step Tips and Techniques for Professional Results

comments (172) April 11th, 2009 in blogs

BetsyE Betsy Engel, contributor
thumbs up 43 users recommend

buy this book here - CLICK TO ENLARGE

buy this book here

Photo: Courtesy of Watson-Guptill Publications

EDITORS NOTE: Each week we highlight an interesting woodworking book in The Editors Mailbox. Starting with this post, we'll be giving away every book we write about to one lucky reader who posts a comment. Check back weekly to enter.

Furniture Restoration: Step-by-Step Tips and Techniques for Professional Results
by Ina Brosseau Marx and Allen Marx.
Watson-Guptill Publications, September 2007.
$50.00; 272 pp.

The authors of Furniture Restoration have been professional restorers for thirty years and pull from their vast experience to provide tips for restoring furniture, frames, and other objects. In the introduction, they say the book was written for “would-be restorers...amateur restorers…professional restorers…and non-craftsmen…who would like to guide restorers.” In the book they cover topics such as repairing structures and restoring surfaces; wood and its problems; restoring veneers and gilding and a lot more. The book is filled with color photos showing objects “in-process” as well as the finished pieces and many how-to step-by-step photos.

Leave a comment on this post by 12:00am, Monday, April 20, and you might just win this book. A winner will be chosen at random and announced on Monday, April 20.



posted in: blogs, Books


Comments (172)

mysticgoldtoy mysticgoldtoy writes: We have inherited, as well as purchased, several pieces of family heirloom furniture. We would like to totally restore one or two of these pieces, but have no clue how to go about the process. This book sounds like the perfect solution!
Posted: 12:50 pm on March 16th

jose_christian32 jose_christian32 writes: This is great, we just received a woodden bassinette as a gift to our soon to come baby boy. this would be the perfect chance for me to learn about restoring.
Posted: 10:55 am on June 17th

dtobey dtobey writes: I just started to refinish the estate furniture from my Mom and Dads farm. There is a round oak table and four chairs. The finish is gummy and in some places it chips off. The table has been taken apart and two chairs also. So the book would be a great resource to begin and finish the project. ThanksDT
Posted: 11:47 am on May 11th

woodchic woodchic writes: Hello.....I am getting ready to restore and refinish some old chairs that bought. Your book would be a great resource of informtion, and techniques..... and would benifit me on helping me out on something, that I know absolutely nothing about restoring and refinishing furniture.

Robin Renee'

AKA woodchic
Posted: 11:25 am on April 27th

Scorpion7120 Scorpion7120 writes: Restoring furniture is value added for everyone. The opportunity to save a person's work from the land fill is satisfying; the oppotunity to save a person's family hierlom is gratifying. You can put a price on a piece that evokes memories and keeps the ancestors close.
Posted: 6:21 am on April 23rd

danr63628 danr63628 writes: Love restoring old furniture. This book would really come in handy
Posted: 6:02 am on April 22nd

HandleyPageMonoplane HandleyPageMonoplane writes: Friends and neighbors have been bring restoration projects to me for the past couple of years. I struggle and try different things and strategies... often after many do-overs until it finally looks right. Each project takes a long time, I know there must be better ways. This book could be the next "tool" in my workshop. Thanks FWW
Posted: 2:25 pm on April 21st

mike05 mike05 writes: this is a very cool give away. i think a good way to learn is from seeing how it was made in the past.
Posted: 11:17 am on April 21st

stanrisk stanrisk writes: I have been restoring furniture and things for many years. I always welcome new and different ways to do things better.
Posted: 10:33 pm on April 20th

BillEllis BillEllis writes: Restoring furniture is a real talent. I have done my share but would love to learn more about it.
Posted: 11:03 am on April 20th

bo5ephus bo5ephus writes: Looks cool. Ive got some chairs at home that could use that book.
Posted: 10:49 am on April 20th

barobin barobin writes: My wife inherited a bedroom set that her Mother bought just after they were married about 60 years ago. She wants to retore it. This book look like the ticket for how that can be done.
Posted: 10:29 pm on April 19th

StanleyW StanleyW writes: I am in the process of restoring an old chair, now would be a good time to get this info from the pros. Thanks.
Posted: 9:50 pm on April 19th

paytonsopa paytonsopa writes: Both me and my wife love restoring old furniture as we purchase our first piece some 35 years ago. We both have been self taught in resoration of all our projects and it would be nice to have some good references to look at and find where we could improve on our projects!!
Thanks, PaytonsOPA&OMA
Posted: 8:50 pm on April 19th

vkw0701 vkw0701 writes: I am just getting started with woodworking, but have had a passion for antiques and restoration. This book would help me get started. Thanks CB
Posted: 6:41 pm on April 19th

garyvont garyvont writes: I've learned so much about woodworking from you other recommend titles, I'll surely purchase this on if I'm not the winner!
Posted: 5:15 pm on April 19th

shades59901 shades59901 writes: Looks like a Great book to read on and to learn from the experts..I have restored dressers, furnniture thru the yrs. this book would of probley saved me alot of time yrs. ago.But now getting ready to restore an old grand father clock with pull chains etc. and a couple of old cabinets..I would love to win this book, but if I don't I'll have to pick up a copy of this....MGM
Posted: 3:18 pm on April 19th

jyang949 jyang949 writes: Cool. I have always wanted to get into restoring.
Posted: 12:37 pm on April 19th

stevesphotoz stevesphotoz writes: After a major project restoring an entire kitchen full of cabinets, this book probably would have saved me time and money
Posted: 10:14 am on April 19th

stevesphotoz stevesphotoz writes: After a major project restoring an entire kitchen full of cabinets, this book probably would have saved me time and money
Posted: 10:14 am on April 19th

scobourn scobourn writes: Looks like a great book. Maybe they can teach an old restoration dog some new tricks.
Posted: 12:36 am on April 19th

RWSwanson RWSwanson writes: Living in the heart of the Midwest, I don't come into contact with many 100+ year old family heirloom furniture pieces nor do we have any from our family. Most of what I see and can afford are very much utility pieces that were for practical use, then upgraded as the family circumstances allowed. Then perhaps moved to an outbuilding and maybe to the barn for their final resting place.

These forgotten furniture pieces are generally very practical and utilitarian in nature with little if any ornamentation.

My skills at bringing back these often sad little objects are mostly from trial and error.

First off there are, I'd guess, tens of thousands of these kind of pieces that are very serviceable and would provide years of use if they are rehabilitated correctly. Secondly, I would hope that this new book devotes a fair amount of information to untrained woodworkers, like myself, to help us turn these Sears & Roebuck pieces into real family heirlooms.

I'll watch the reviews on this book to see if it covers the areas that I'm interested in.
Posted: 10:06 pm on April 18th

mysticgoldtoy mysticgoldtoy writes: We inherited an old cabinet/desk with a curved glass front. This book looks like an excellent guide to dealing with the darkened, thick finish. We've been avoiding the restoration task for lack of knowledge on how to proceed.
Posted: 9:44 pm on April 18th

retiredauditor retiredauditor writes: once again you folks manage to come up with just what I have been looking for!
Posted: 5:27 pm on April 18th

sawdustandknotholes sawdustandknotholes writes: I'd like to learn the professional way to restore antique or old furniture. Looks like a great reference.
Posted: 3:52 pm on April 18th

DWats DWats writes: Excellent, this is what I've been looking for. If Idon't win it I will buy it.
Posted: 1:53 pm on April 18th

Zabo2 Zabo2 writes: I've done some restoring and found it to be a very tedious but rewarding project. I would like to do more and this book looks like it would be very helpfull in that respect.
Posted: 12:22 pm on April 18th

Zabo2 Zabo2 writes: I've done some restoring and found it to be a very tedious but rewarding project. I would like to do more and this book looks like it would be very helpfull in that respect.
Posted: 12:22 pm on April 18th

Zabo2 Zabo2 writes: I've done some restoring and found it to be a very tedious but rewarding project. I would like to do more and this book looks like it would be very helpfull in that respect.
Posted: 12:22 pm on April 18th

Eriewood Eriewood writes: We recently were given a very, very old dresser, that needs restoring. This book would be a real boon to our efforts, as there is some damaged veneering that we are not sure how to repair. Thanks for the chance to win this book !!!
Posted: 7:52 am on April 18th

Obeeswax Obeeswax writes: With my folks just moving nearby and their old, not yet antique furniture needing a facelift or repair this may just be the book needed! How about a "search inside" feature? I wonder if the book could be used to refinish kitchen cabinets that are 70-80 years old....Thanks!
Posted: 7:50 am on April 18th

WBGoodwin WBGoodwin writes: If I win the book, I promise to read it;) My woodworking book library is in need of a book on refinshing.

Thanks for all the good advice you provide.
Posted: 7:38 am on April 18th

oleneff oleneff writes: It's been a long tome since I have refinished furniture and I am looking to refresh my knowledge and learn new skills that would be helpful.
Posted: 7:34 am on April 18th

walterjk walterjk writes: As a hobbyist woodworker for over 50 years I have read, tried, made, finished and refinished many projects. In the last 30+ years I have been a collector and restorer of antique automatically played musical instruments, that include music boxes both disk and cylinder, acoustic phonographs, reproducing and coin operated pianos and orchestrions and any type of musical instrument that is played by a roll, disk, book or record. You can see an instrument at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmk9cRp5Z4w ,that I and a partner restored from what certainly would have been the dump. This restoration took us about one half the Saturdays over a 14 year period and involved skills in cabinet work, veneering, gilding, finishing, staining plus skill in the restoration of pianos and organs. You can see and hear this instrument as it plays as it might have IN 1910, when it was made, for the patrons of the Dance Hall it was reputed too come from, in the Coney Island Area of New York City.
The book on furniture restoration will certainly be a reference that I will refer to often during work of restoring those instruments still needing attention in my collection.
Posted: 4:18 am on April 18th

GPolarbear GPolarbear writes: I've just come into possession of a drop front desk built by my maternal grandfather back in the early 20th century. It clearly needs restoring, and I want to bring it back to its original glory. This book sounds like it would have lots of advice about just this kind of project!
Posted: 1:46 am on April 18th

srtjase srtjase writes: On Easter my folks asked for my help in repairing a veneered surface on a dining room table that has been in our family for a few generations. It's a great piece with a mahogany veneer across the top. Its important to my dad to see if I can fix it, but I'm really not sure how to do it without causing others issues.

I'm a decent woodworker, but I'm not at all comfortable attempting a repair on this table.

I'll take any advise that anyone wants to give on how to approach this project.
Posted: 11:55 pm on April 17th

paulsoniac paulsoniac writes: I have two antique tables that cost me $3000. and the veneer on one of them is warped, besides other problems.
I do not feel confident wit the information I have from my wood restoration books, to tackle this job. Perhaps I could learn something new (to me) that will give me the confidence I need to get this project on the way and save.
Posted: 10:30 pm on April 17th

wallachuck wallachuck writes: I read almost anything available on restoration especially if it is approached from a conservator point of view. That I cannot tell before reading the book. Any antique piece deserves to be treated with reversible materials so it can be restored yet again.
Posted: 9:59 pm on April 17th

fmarabate fmarabate writes: I am going to have to check this one out. I have been considering doing so refinshing/repairing to try and supplement my income.
Posted: 9:37 pm on April 17th

brakeman brakeman writes: As a novice woodworker of 30+years I have firmed up a few antique pieces. I try to stay away from staining and finishing. Maybbe with some more info and good instruction I can move forward. Keep up the good work
Posted: 7:39 pm on April 17th

xv144 xv144 writes: If it's a Taunton book I'm sure it's good. I would like to turn my hobby into an income when I retire. This looks like it might be a good direction to go.
Posted: 6:00 pm on April 17th

takumi takumi writes: Business has worsened by effects of the economic crisis also in Japan. People do not buy the new one. And, the number of those who repair home appliance and the cellular phone and use it seems to have increased.
I do not think that the Japanese is so accustomed to repair of furniture and long use. I hope that many people repair furniture and uses it long in the future.
Posted: 5:24 pm on April 17th

dpict dpict writes: looks like you've started a stampede here. My wife and I bought an oak roll top desk to restore some time ago. It was covered in a black stain of many coats, so my wife decided she should make this her full time job. She lasted all of 30 minutes, so maybe this book will encourage her
Posted: 4:01 pm on April 17th

calgilvin calgilvin writes: Looks like the answer to refinishing questions on some of the projects I have been putting off for lack of knowledge and confidence.
Posted: 4:01 pm on April 17th

FMR FMR writes: Looks like a good resource to reduce my time in repairing and refinishing used/antique furniture (might help me avoid mistakes).
Thanks for highlighting it.

Posted: 3:39 pm on April 17th

siragusapass1 siragusapass1 writes: I can use a book like this. My wife picks up old furniture at garage sales, the side of the road and even at the dump. She keeps me busy.
Posted: 3:28 pm on April 17th

wagonboss wagonboss writes: I've been building, finishing ane restoring new and antique furniture for 30 plus years, but realize i need to continually educate myself on old and new techniques. I'm sure this book would be beneficial to myself as well as many other fellow woodworkers. Building a project is only the beginning of piece of furniture, and we sure don't want to skip any other important steps, as this book would surely cover. THANKS FW!!!
Posted: 3:20 pm on April 17th

Boyscout13 Boyscout13 writes: Restore, waste not, want not
Posted: 3:09 pm on April 17th

pabull pabull writes: This is just up my alley, we have 11 children and just moved into our new house. Out of money we shop garage sales for furniture. To make them look right in our house, I do some fixing and give them a new coat of lacquer, replace some hardware and we are good to go. I can use some help with step by step tips in all of this. Now that I know about this book, I might have to ask it for my birthday next month.
Thanks a lot FWW, fun book!
Posted: 2:47 pm on April 17th

AriesDragon AriesDragon writes: Wow great book to have. In this economy I'd rather restore than buy new!
Thanks!
Posted: 1:30 pm on April 17th

mj_in_ashland mj_in_ashland writes: Wow, the book sounds great! Your give away certainly has put a few more comments on the blog.

-mj
Posted: 12:46 pm on April 17th

rondeal rondeal writes: I just love fixing and getting old stuff!
Posted: 12:45 pm on April 17th

feanorgem feanorgem writes: This book would help with all those projects I don't have time to do.

Posted: 12:21 pm on April 17th

jjarrett96 jjarrett96 writes: Sign me up. I have an old china hutch that needs restored.
Posted: 12:20 pm on April 17th

netartsdave netartsdave writes: The book sounds wonderful. Being retired, and starting "back" into woodworking as a retirement hobby, I am already on a limited budget. One of the things that I have as a project is the restoration of several pieces of furniture that I have acquired over the years, some from family, and others from travel. This sounds just like the information that I need, but will be hard pressed to acquire. But, I do hope to get more information on what in in the book, as FW has done a wonderful job of reviewing books, in the past, and I will be very interested in a "in depth" review of this particular volume, prior to adding it to my "must have" list.
Posted: 11:26 am on April 17th

Suzzie Suzzie writes: I'm new to this world and beleive that this publication would open my eyes to part of this world - Enjoy your Website - Best Wishes
Posted: 11:02 am on April 17th

biandu biandu writes: Sounds like a great book, $50 is a lot. Would like to know more about it. How many pages, illustrations, etc.
Posted: 11:00 am on April 17th

kilcummin kilcummin writes: In addition to refinishing I would like to know if the book
covers repairing finishes as well. Many times refinishing
is not an option.
Posted: 10:55 am on April 17th

Elsabae Elsabae writes: Looks like the answer to some of the projects I have been putting off for lack of knowledge and confidence...
Posted: 10:16 am on April 17th

Harwoody Harwoody writes: Excellent idea! Will be interesting to see just how comprehensive and practical the authors instruction is.
Thank you!
Posted: 10:15 am on April 17th

texan63 texan63 writes: This book will be particularly interesting to me since I have a furniture restoration business. Thanx FWW
Posted: 10:06 am on April 17th

Maridon Maridon writes: Furniture restoration is a project that I approach carefully since I have no training. I have had many requests to refinish and restore furniture but alas, due to my lack of training resources I turn most down.

Maybe I'm missing out on something.

Posted: 9:55 am on April 17th

jcur88 jcur88 writes: If I won this book I could save the world through good techniques in furniture restoration.
Posted: 9:48 am on April 17th

jduwoodman jduwoodman writes: Looks like just the ticket. I do a limited amount of restoration because of lack of knowledge. This would be great to have. I too may have to purchase this if I don't win.
Posted: 9:40 am on April 17th

Tarasa Tarasa writes: Books like these can be helpful, but caution in restoration is the prime directive. It is all too easy to do irreparable damage to a fine antique. My work is the field of violin family repairs and restorations and the mantra there is to save as much original wood as possible and to make no repairs that are irreversible. That may be difficult with furniture but it ensures that both proper techniques and materials are used. With stringed instruments that rules out newer glues that are both water tight and irreversible.
Posted: 9:40 am on April 17th

rhclapper63 rhclapper63 writes: I have always wanted to do restoration projects. I was driving one day, and seen an "old" chair on the side of the road. It appeared to be in pretty good shape overall,, two rear legs broke, and some added paint from the years pryor,, but I thought,, I am going to redo this chair,, I know it could be a beautiful piece of furniture again,, and so, I loaded it up, and stuck it in my loft above my work shop,, hoping one day to be able to redo it. If I had instruction, like this publication would provide me, I am betting I would be able to accomplish this task. Thank you for the oppertunity.
Posted: 9:39 am on April 17th

turnersmuse turnersmuse writes: Structure repair is frequently hidden but so very important; I would like to learn more. Plese enter me for this book!
Posted: 9:39 am on April 17th

cwcarronsr cwcarronsr writes: I don't WORK in the woodworking/refinishing field as a profession like so many others, I'm only a retired hobbyist and novice. I seem to have less problems with following plans, sawing, drilling routing and assembling than refinishing. yet there is nothing that brings more satisfaction than to have succeeded with the finished product. I don't know why I always to seem to have so much apprehension when it comes to applying the finish to my projects except that perhaps I'm so fearful of screwing it up and making a complete mess of the finished piece with no way to recover. I don't have the most steady hands at this stage of my life, yet I find woodworking brings me such great relaxation now, that I didn't have in my adult life before retirement. I always had such a stressful job that I was plugged into practically 24/7 that I didn't have time for hobbies. I did however have great success early on in my young adult years restoring an old Oak Hutch that was built around 1920-1930. I was particularly proud of how that piece turned out and I even passed it on to two of my sisters who each had the Hutch for several years after I had it for several myself. I think that's probably what turned me on to the Woodworking/refinishing field to begin with.

Now I feel like a kid in a toy store with each new project and each new tool I undertake. I learn through hands on experience and what I read on line, mags, and a couple of Christmas gift books that my family has given me. This book looks like something I would really like to get my hands on and would be a tremendous help to an old geezer like me.

Not too old to learn,
Chuck
Posted: 9:15 am on April 17th

MREJC MREJC writes: I have been in the restoration business for over 30 years. In that time I have checked out and purchased many books on this subject....restoration. From the UK, Canada, France, USA, etc. Honestly I have a red flag when authors claim to design a book that will apeal to amatures, pro's, non-craftsmen....? wow! I will preview this effort on this subject..... put together by the "Marx Brothers?" Maybe it will turn out to be...."A Day At The Restoration Shop"....or a handy, informative how to reference....MREJC
Posted: 8:55 am on April 17th

blackdaan blackdaan writes: I am taking a course this summer in furniture repair. This book looks like it would be a big help.
Posted: 8:43 am on April 17th

collinsharry collinsharry writes: I have been repairing and restoring for 30 years down here. 13 years here in Pass Christian. I have always stayed busy but the great storm of 2005 ( Kat ) has been a real challenge. I get parts and pieces is shopping bags that are all that is left from a home full of family treasures.

My shop went under 4' of salt water and I was nearly a year getting up and running with the help of people from all over the country helping ( an atomic scientist over hauled my metal working lathe). What a country.

I do my best in this continuing education in skill and appreciation. I learn something new each day and always look forward to getting in my shop.

Fine Woodworking has been my inspiration and guide starting with the first issue. Keep up the good work and don't change. This new book sounds like something I can use. I'll put it on my Christmas wish list.

What a life I have, I do what I love and never work.

Harry
Posted: 8:40 am on April 17th

rexthedog rexthedog writes: Interesting if a bit expensive. If it offers enough detail on how to disassemble pieces without damaging it may be worth it.
Posted: 8:38 am on April 17th

thewoodturnerpa thewoodturnerpa writes: Looks like a good book to have and let me keep up with the furniture restorers I work with and turn for.
Posted: 8:29 am on April 17th

Hallsworth Hallsworth writes: I have some furniture that could use a little restoration, this would be a good book to have...
Posted: 7:59 am on April 17th

mrr mrr writes: I'd be interested in seeing how this book recommends dealing with the restoration of marquetry. Also how to compensate for woods included in the original project that are no longer available in usable sizes ar at all.
Posted: 7:58 am on April 17th

frankburns frankburns writes: The 'restoration' books I've read have also been helpful in the making of new items and in my new endeavor, automotive interior woodwork restoration. I suspect that many makers of new furniture pieces have often been asked by friends to do repairs as well. Thanks for the offer FW.
Frank Burns
Posted: 7:57 am on April 17th

santos00 santos00 writes: Looks like a great book! Would love to have, especially if I win it!! :)
Posted: 7:13 am on April 17th

ronmundy ronmundy writes: I have had a very old carved wood, upholstered bench project on hold for far too long. This may be the jumpstart I need to finally complete it.
Ron.
Posted: 6:52 am on April 17th

arfabuck arfabuck writes: Hmmmmmmm. Another book on restoration. I wonder if it adds anything new to the library or knowlege base. Fifty bucks puts it out of my range.
Best wishes to the winner!
Art
Posted: 5:28 am on April 17th

restofanatic restofanatic writes: Help! I have a garage full of restoration projects waiting to be done, but good sources of 'how to' are as scarce as a nice thin shaving on end-grain here in New Zealand. My projects call to me "restore me to my former beauty" and I keep telling them I will. Here's to classic furniture!
Posted: 4:21 am on April 17th

anemergentagrarian anemergentagrarian writes: Sounds like an interesting book. Like others, I've been hesitant to tackle refinishing some of the antiques I've inherited for fear of ruining them.
Posted: 3:02 am on April 17th

oakdust54 oakdust54 writes: Aftert many years of working Health Care and helping others I know find I have to change carriers because of a muscle tear. I have been into woodworking for about ten years and now it will have to help support me and my family. I have trying to learn the art of restoration foe several years but have never found a reference that guides the new guy.
Posted: 2:33 am on April 17th

chairmannz chairmannz writes: Just what i need.
Had a accident and can not work for a few months.( shoulder operation was needed)
reading this would makes time fly.
Posted: 1:49 am on April 17th

MTMan2 MTMan2 writes: Furniture restoration is a great topic. It would be nice to also see more on tool restoration, musical instrument restoration, and architectural woodwork restoration.
Posted: 1:18 am on April 17th

tom012947 tom012947 writes: My wife and I have a house of antiques. We traded a perfectly good 50 year old maple bedroom set for a 125 year old mahogney one...
I have some that have been in the family for over 200 years and need a touch up but have been waiting to get the knowledge to do it without messing them up.
Posted: 1:04 am on April 17th

brian s brian s writes: I'd be interested to hear how this book compares with Brian D. Hingleys book "Furniture Repair & Refinishing", which I've been using.
Posted: 12:11 am on April 17th

jiggy246 jiggy246 writes: i recently tried to restore an antique of my great grandmas and boy what a challenge . I'm excited to see if I win to find out what could of been done to make things easier thanks FWW
Posted: 12:05 am on April 17th

TONYHENDO TONYHENDO writes: i keep my finger cross that i will win, things i love more than woodworking is reading about how to make it better.


Posted: 12:04 am on April 17th

geppetto425 geppetto425 writes: I do quite a bit of restoration work. I really enjoy the actual repair work (broken legs, missing veneer, loose drawers, etc) but the actual refinishing and or trying to preserve the old patina is part art, part chemistry and part frustration. I would love to look at the recipes for finishing in this book. Thanks for the opportunity to receive it.

http://web.me.com/geppetto425/Site/Welcome.html
Posted: 12:02 am on April 17th

nava1uni nava1uni writes: Furniture restoration and repair is a marriage of creativity and wood working skills. I use furniture restoration and upholstery to relieve the stress of my job. Finding pieces that have been discarded I return them to usable condition and they become a part of people's homes. I recently found a platform rocker in a dumpster and repaired the carved arms and platform, then installed newly tied spring and reupholstered it in a beautiful wool fabric.
Posted: 11:45 pm on April 16th

jscotlandr jscotlandr writes: I refinish furniture from time to time. This book would be great as the restoration process is nothing like finishing bare wood.
Posted: 11:25 pm on April 16th

wyo100 wyo100 writes: Yes, please enter me to win the Furniture Restoration book. I do antique frniture restoration and am always looking for reference and expertise.
Posted: 11:06 pm on April 16th

Iron_Mushroom Iron_Mushroom writes: Restoration has to be the original recycling process. I've always enjoyed restoring and returning items to be useful once again. New ways of accomplishing that goal is what learning is all about. Can hardly wait to get a copy of this book.
Posted: 11:05 pm on April 16th

tommyd100 tommyd100 writes: This would be very nice to add to my restored bookcase.
Posted: 11:05 pm on April 16th

O2man O2man writes: Having tried and failed, perhaps it is time to get some help.
Posted: 10:57 pm on April 16th

ttbone64 ttbone64 writes: PLEASE, I need all the help I can get
Posted: 10:54 pm on April 16th

philsfire philsfire writes: Restoration scares me.
This might be a good read.
phil
Posted: 10:48 pm on April 16th

brands01 brands01 writes: I have been looking for a good refinishing guide for quite a while and this sounds like the book I have been looking for!
Posted: 10:45 pm on April 16th

stickerman stickerman writes: I just finished restoring my children's original high chair for my 1st grandson and I gave myself a b- for the result. This book may have help in problem areas I look forward to reading
Posted: 10:42 pm on April 16th

biggdaddy66 biggdaddy66 writes: this sonds like a good book for me a biggener
Posted: 10:41 pm on April 16th

TurningTeacher TurningTeacher writes: To be able to share other's long experience is always valuable. Does the book cover old finishing techniques?
Posted: 10:27 pm on April 16th

Redoy Redoy writes: Furniture restoration is a hobby that I have been trying to learn for quit some time. I have gone to workshops , consulted experts, and studied many books. It seems that the more I learn the more I find there is to learn. My goal is to be able to make this hobby profitable when I retire. This book would be a welcome addition to my library.
Posted: 10:19 pm on April 16th

golfgloeckner golfgloeckner writes: Restoring an old piece of furniture is equally as rewarding as building a new piece. Over the years I have done much of each and learned much in the processes.

I am always anxious to learn more and would love to win what appears to be an excellent book about restoraton.

Frank Gloeckner
Posted: 10:04 pm on April 16th

warspyder warspyder writes: Looks like a good book.
Posted: 9:41 pm on April 16th

pdxwoodsman pdxwoodsman writes: How can we know where we are, without looking where we've come from.
Restoration is an excellent way to see what works... and what doesn't in furniture construction.

One can never have too many books!!!
Michael D.
Portland Oregon
Posted: 9:34 pm on April 16th

KarlMitschke KarlMitschke writes: Looks like a good book
Posted: 9:28 pm on April 16th

Houghton123 Houghton123 writes: Good to see a book on maintaining old work, instead of making new. From the cover, it looks a step up from a lot of the furniture repair books in my county library. Please put my name in the hat.
Posted: 9:25 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: sorry about the multiple postings. I didn't do that on purpose. This was my first post and I clearly did not realize what I was doing
Posted: 9:21 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: sorry about the multiple postings. I didn't do that on purpose. This was my first post and I clearly did not realize what I was doing
Posted: 9:21 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:20 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:20 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:19 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:19 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:18 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:18 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:18 pm on April 16th

JeffSchrader JeffSchrader writes: I am in the middle of restoring an old railroad wall pendulum clock. The case is made of mostly cherry and cherry veneer, but the maker also substituted some mahogany for some of the moldings. Apparently he worked with whatever materials he had on hand. This book would be very useful in trying to find a finish that would blend the colors of these two woods, as well as do some minor repairs to the veneers.
Posted: 9:18 pm on April 16th

zellner1 zellner1 writes: I am looking to get into the furniture restoration business as a hobby-side business that I would enjoy, but would like to here more from experts as to how to do restoration. I am currently semi retired and on a limited budget.

Thanks for listening!
Posted: 9:16 pm on April 16th

Philoktetes Philoktetes writes: The Marxes have written this book with the beginner in mind, so they do not leave out any important steps. However, their 30+ years of experience is apparent on every page, so more experienced will also find new ideas and techniques.
Posted: 9:14 pm on April 16th

robglenn robglenn writes: Have enjoyed woodworking as hobby for 40yr, and mainly making antique reproductions. A book such as this would be very useful and a good edition to have in my woodworking library. Looking forward to seeing the book.
Posted: 8:53 pm on April 16th

Igknot Igknot writes: I've been searching for a comprehensive refinishing reference and it sounds like this could be it.
Thanks.
Posted: 8:53 pm on April 16th

Rick in Bothwell Rick in Bothwell writes: That would be handy. Only been making sawdust a few years and anything new would be great.
Posted: 8:36 pm on April 16th

brojez brojez writes: Can always add a new one to the collection. Would like to see a little more of what it has to offer.
Posted: 8:27 pm on April 16th

BangoBango BangoBango writes: We have a 1910 house with a lot of older furniture that could use a restoration. This book seems to be just what I need! Hope I win. ciao - BB
Posted: 8:03 pm on April 16th

tryhard tryhard writes: This book sounds interesting. Enter me to win....it might take me in a different direction.
Posted: 7:54 pm on April 16th

cadiss cadiss writes: I have some items we brought back from England when I was stationed there. Book would be a big help restoring them.
Thanks for the chance to own such a great book.
Posted: 7:53 pm on April 16th

fmesiano1 fmesiano1 writes: would love to won a book that gives in-depth instruction in creating painted finishes
Posted: 7:38 pm on April 16th

lukulele lukulele writes: Please enter us! My 7th and 8th graders would enjoy this as a resource in our library. Teachers are extremely frugal and expect us to fix(salvage) everything they can bring into the shop. Cover photo is excellent.
Posted: 7:38 pm on April 16th

mtrwhlbyr mtrwhlbyr writes: Looks prety good I have restored a few antiques in the past with good results, but there is always more to learn
Posted: 7:29 pm on April 16th

southernboggie southernboggie writes: This sounds like a very useful book. I would love to get a copy.

Thanks for entering me in contest.

Ken
Posted: 7:26 pm on April 16th

JB_thecarp JB_thecarp writes: This book has been on my wishlist for a long time. One may review the contents on Amazon. I believe it is considered a significant member of the restoration oeuvre.
Posted: 7:23 pm on April 16th

biochemist biochemist writes: I have some old furniture that needs some work. This sounds like a good book to learn some techniques. If there is anything I need it is step-by-step instructions.
Posted: 7:18 pm on April 16th

gmlhl4 gmlhl4 writes: Great idea! Sign me up.
Posted: 7:05 pm on April 16th

baudi baudi writes: OK! I hereby enter the contest.
Posted: 6:59 pm on April 16th

regisand regisand writes: Betsy,

Good choice and thank you for the brief explanation of the book, but could you give us your opinion. How does it read? Are the instructions clear? Does the book make assuptions, or it talks about every single step?
Thank you,
Regis
Posted: 6:50 pm on April 16th

sam7iam sam7iam writes: Awfully expensive, even at 300 pages! As someone already mentioned, one usually gets to peek at a few pages. If it is as good as is claimed, it would be dog-eared quickly in my 'library'! Thanks!
Posted: 6:42 pm on April 16th

ncrob ncrob writes: Perfect timing, I could use a little advice before I start on my next project.
Posted: 6:00 pm on April 16th

denisgvs1 denisgvs1 writes: ...Cannot wait to get the book! I mean to get the book!
Good choice. Thank you!
Posted: 5:29 pm on April 16th

GregSudkamp GregSudkamp writes: I am interested in the book, but would like to see more about it before I buy. Some sites that sell books let you see the table of contents and a sample of the writing. I would appreciate it if Fine Woodworking would do the same on its web site.
Posted: 1:41 pm on April 13th

pbibbo pbibbo writes: Sounds like a great book, would be great to my collection.
Posted: 1:05 pm on April 13th

evitagen22 evitagen22 writes: I would love to get a copy of this book. Sounds like lots of excellent info!
Posted: 12:54 pm on April 13th

parkerozgood parkerozgood writes: My grampa has passed down this chair to me that is in desperate need of repair. Thanks for the chance

jason@allworldautomotive.com

Posted: 12:37 pm on April 13th

coosbaydave coosbaydave writes: If I win this, my better half will probably make me fix the old high-back chair that had one of its bottom cross members chewed off years ago by a rambunctious puppy. I would love to learn a successful way to proceed.
Posted: 12:32 pm on April 13th

wurmm wurmm writes: This is a must have for anyone who builds or maintains furniture. I would love to increase my knowledge base with this book. wurmm
Posted: 12:08 pm on April 13th

benito benito writes: I could use this book right now. But I could also use it later to see how I was all wrong.
Posted: 10:34 am on April 13th

daddonut daddonut writes: I need a book like this.
Posted: 10:32 am on April 13th

gusset gusset writes: Sounds like a treasure trove of info for all woodworkers from beginner to master.
Posted: 9:27 am on April 13th

DLWoodworker DLWoodworker writes: I have some pieces of furniture that have been in my family for a number of years. Some need a little attention. I have been working with wood to some degree since I was in grade school. I read a lot and try different techniques that sounds like they are a good way to go. Watching Antiques Roadshow you always wonder if one piece would be worth something. I always respect someone that has been in a business for a number of years, has learned along the way and then is willing to share that knowledge with others. Sounds like this would be a great book to learn more about step by step instructions, the tools, the materials needed to complete the restoration and applying the techniques to other areas of work. Like panels and walls. I have seen this book before and have thought about purchasing it. This would be a great addition to my library and to add to my skills.
Posted: 9:07 am on April 13th

hdgis1 hdgis1 writes: Jeez! Forget the book and tell me where to find the item on front of book!
Posted: 9:00 am on April 13th

Jim65 Jim65 writes: Excellent chance to learn another trade, I have always been a little reluctant to try restoring.. Cheers and thanks for the chance!
Posted: 8:29 am on April 13th

antsecho antsecho writes: What a great looking book. I am a 2nd year apprentice and this would be a great way to learn more. Sign me up please.
Posted: 8:00 am on April 13th

sk2tobin sk2tobin writes: Well I have never done restoring but that doesn't mean that I won't try my hand at it. I would love to learn restoring. Sign me up!
Posted: 1:59 am on April 13th

slydogx slydogx writes: Sign me up!
Posted: 10:18 pm on April 12th

WoodLess WoodLess writes: A free book on furniture restoration, sign me up. Great promotion, FWW should do more of this.

Chuck
Posted: 9:37 pm on April 12th

mrfixitnow mrfixitnow writes: The next best thing to making a masterpiece is restoring one, provided it is done properly. Looks like this book is a fine reference for making that happen.
Posted: 8:51 pm on April 12th

SteveSchoene SteveSchoene writes: Looks like a great book that should cover a range of restoration and finishing questions.
Posted: 6:41 pm on April 12th

towel towel writes: Never hurts to learn more about what I'm interested in. Thanks for the chance to win a copy.
Posted: 6:28 pm on April 12th

bcwoodman bcwoodman writes: I need this book to make more money
Posted: 4:21 pm on April 12th

AsTheNight AsTheNight writes: We can definately use this book; we bought a very old house that we're restoring, and some very old furniture that needs some work. Thanks for the chance to win a copy.
Posted: 2:29 pm on April 12th

flairwoodworks flairwoodworks writes: Generally, I don't like repairing furniture - I'd rather build instead. Maybe this book will turn me around. (Maybe not).
Posted: 1:45 pm on April 12th

mvflaim mvflaim writes: Book has gotten a few good reviews on Amazon. I put it on my wish list.
Posted: 9:49 am on April 12th

MrC MrC writes: Looks like a great book. I have an old desk that is just waiting for the techniques I could learn.
Thanks FW!
Posted: 8:46 am on April 12th

LarryMarshall LarryMarshall writes: This looks like a book I need in my library. Love the cover.


Posted: 8:26 am on April 12th

Gijsbert Gijsbert writes: Some good inspiring bedtime reading. I hope to win a copy.
Posted: 11:06 pm on April 11th

JLYoung JLYoung writes: I restored an old dresser that was passed down to me from my mother. I don;t know how old it is but after removing several coats of gaudy paint, it ended up being beautiful maple underneath with nice dovetailed drawers. There was a great deal of learning involved in the project and I still get a sense of pride everytime I look at it.
Posted: 10:44 pm on April 11th

ricward ricward writes: I have made funriture, but I have never tried restoring furniture.....yet. I am anxious to find a piece that needs repair.
Posted: 9:52 pm on April 11th

salamfam salamfam writes: Looks like a winner, I can't wait to get my hands on a copy.
Posted: 6:54 pm on April 11th

John_Florida John_Florida writes: Who that loves wood couldn't use this book?
Posted: 4:10 pm on April 11th

birdsill birdsill writes: I recently restored a bed my wife's family has had since it was made in 1901. No one knows when, but it had a leg broken off years ago. I repaired that and blended it very well, if I do say so myself, but it would have definitely been nice to have had some expert guidance to reassure me!
Posted: 3:37 pm on April 11th

granite36 granite36 writes: Looks like a great addition to my library. I am embarking on a restoration project of an antique spinning wheel that has been in storage for many years. There are broken parts and bad paint jobs to overcome, but the wood is sound.

I also have an antique pump organ that I want to restore. The wood appears to be mahogany but there are many layers of finish to uncover and some repairs to make.

Thanks!
Posted: 1:08 pm on April 11th

hubiedoo517 hubiedoo517 writes: In these economic times furniture restoration could be a good way to gain some extra income. Thanks for the chance to learn from the experts.
Posted: 1:04 pm on April 11th

slabcreek slabcreek writes: Excellent. If I don't win it I just may have to pick up a copy. (too bad being the first comment doesn't get me any bonus entries..). Thanks FW!!

Posted: 11:40 am on April 11th

You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.

Advertise here for as little as $50. Learn how

Save up to 52% on Fine Woodworking

 

Become a Better Woodworker

ABOUT THE EDITORS MAILBOX

FineWoodworking.com editors report from the woodworking front lines. Check in every weekday for news, information, projects, and answers to questions from Fine Woodworking readers everywhere.

Learn about our new format!

Archive: Temporarily unavailable. Stay tuned and sorry for the inconvenience.