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2014 Cartouche Award Winner Announced

comments (8) January 29th, 2014 in blogs

Tom Tom McKenna, Managing Editor
thumbs up 11 users recommend

Patrick Edwards holds the 2014 Cartouche Award, given by SAPFM.
Louis-Philippe Tilt-Top Tables by Patrick Edwards
English Marquetry Clock by Patrick Edwards
Patrick Edwards holds the 2014 Cartouche Award, given by SAPFM. - CLICK TO ENLARGE

Patrick Edwards holds the 2014 Cartouche Award, given by SAPFM.

Photo: Courtesy of SAPFM

I just returned from Working Wood in the 18th Century: Dining in Style, a conference co-sponsored by the people at Colonial Williamsburg and Fine Woodworking. It's a great venue, and the presenters are top-notch.

While I was there I attended the annual banquet of the Society of American Period Furniture Makers (SAPFM), where they introduce the Cartouche Award winner. This year, the Society chose Patrick Edwards. Edwards, a native of San Diego, is the country's leading expert on French period marquetry, and his work is dazzling.

His path toward furniture making was not necessarily linear. He studied physics at the University of California at San Diego, and began working at Maxwell Labs after graduating. But the lure of furniture was too much to ignore, so he "retired," and began to pursue his true passion of building period furniture. His primary goal? To pass along the traditions of hand woodworking to the next generation.

Amazingly, he works without plans or drawings, executing intricate marquetry patterns by eye and replicating some of the most stunning works in history. Often his work is are more spectacular than the original. To view his work, visit his website.


 


posted in: blogs


Comments (8)

soontobe49 soontobe49 writes: my head hurts.
Posted: 3:35 pm on February 5th

Sharp_Blade Sharp_Blade writes: I possess neither the skill nor the patience to do this.
Posted: 10:38 am on February 3rd

Sherpadog Sherpadog writes: Sheesh! I thought I could do marquetry. I am truly in awe. I bow to your skill and period correctness.
Posted: 9:52 am on February 3rd

TheEastMan TheEastMan writes: Extraordinary work, typical of the famous veneering style developed under Louis XIV, both tables being produced with a single cutting of veneer.
The best one is called '' partie'' and the second best ''contre-partie'' as in ''part', and '' counter-part''.
This style was carried over to some of Louis XV furniture and the gilt bronze accents are typical of it.
One thing is certain though is that this is NOT Louis Philippe style, which is much later, NOT ornate, usually cherry, and was the first Louis style that was serially produced.
Just to get all those Louis sorted out.
Nonetheless, the work is outstanding and few people have tackled this technique since Louis XV.
Posted: 5:58 pm on February 2nd

timrowledge timrowledge writes: For a moment there I thought the patterns on the top of his tables were derived from particle accelerator results; and despite realising that they aren't I still find myself wanting to see such tables...

For example, this shot of a detector - http://0.tqn.com/d/chemistry/1/0/f/i/LHC.jpg
or this result image- http://cnx.org/content/m42678/latest/Figure_34_05_04.jpg
or this one - http://i.livescience.com/images/i/000/061/645/iFF/particle-collision-physics.jpg?1390478313
Posted: 1:20 pm on February 1st

knut knut writes: A very worthy recipient of the Cartouche award, however it should be noted that marquetry work does almost always involve cutting with a drawing, or pattern for the saw to follow, especially reproductions. I'm sure there are some exceptions to this rule, but they would be pretty rare in my opinion.
Posted: 11:53 am on February 1st

knut knut writes: A very worthy recipient of the Cartouche award, however it should be noted that marquetry work does almost always involve cutting with a drawing, or pattern for the saw to follow, especially reproductions. I'm sure there must be some exceptions to this rule, but they would be extremely rare.
Posted: 11:51 am on February 1st

Bob817 Bob817 writes: Magnificent!
Posted: 9:41 am on February 1st

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