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Shop Talk Live 46: Ed Cuts the Cord

comments (4) November 28th, 2013 in blogs

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This week on Shop Talk Live, Ed cops to an epic smooth move in what could be his most boneheaded shop blunder, ever! - CLICK TO ENLARGE

This week on Shop Talk Live, Ed cops to an epic "smooth move" in what could be his most boneheaded shop blunder, ever!

Photo: Ed Pirnik

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answer questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking's biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast!

 

Also on iTunes Click on the link at left to listen to the podcast, or catch it in iTunes. Remember, our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page. And don't forget to send in your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com.

 

 

 

 

Shop Talk Live 46: Ed Cuts the Cord-Literally

This week we start things off with a nod to the holiday season, as Asa, Matt, and Ed discuss a few of their "service woodworking" projects. Then it's off to the races, as the guys answer a whole host of questions on topics including adjustable mouth handplanes and the Golden Ratio-to finish adhesion issues and double squares vs. combo squares. Finally, Ed cops to what is without a doubt his most boneheaded shop move, EVER! All this and more on a brand-new Shop Talk Live.

 

 

  

 
Asa Christiana 
Special projects editor

Matt Kenney
Senior editor

Ed Pirnik
Senior web producer
 

 

Listen to Previous Episodes


posted in: blogs, podcast, thanksgiving


Comments (4)

horsch horsch writes: I liked the discussion on the Golden Ratio in this week's segment of the podcast. As someone with a match background I think it is interesting to find out when this type of design is implemented. The Greene brothers used it in their architectural design. You can see a good example of this in the Gamble house as explained here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVqmfQSUdGk - starting at about 3:00. Thanks
Posted: 9:49 am on March 25th

SteveHIN SteveHIN writes: My new favorite quote of the decade and mantra for life:

"Learn about woodworking instead of about tools!" (Asa)

Along with the really fine "sermon" that went with it. I love it. It is so true and important. It applies to so many dimensions of life.
Thank you. Love the podcast just the way it is! Love the magazine, too and will look forward to more woodworking and less tool envy :-).
Steve
Posted: 9:34 am on December 13th

Avispex Avispex writes: I just listened to the podcast. While this is not exactly a criticism, I would like to hear your perspective on it (not on the show, just a quick response in the comments is fine.) It always sounds a bit odd for you to ask for a 5 star rating. If you were out to dinner and your server asked for an especially large tip you might think it was a bit unusual. Normally the servers just get whatever tip you leave without asking for the maximum possible amount at the beginning of the meal. Now, in all fairness to you, the world of podcasting and ratings might be completely different and there may be a special significance associated with 5-star ratings which you understand because you are familiar with internet marketing and podcasts and so on. I completely admit that I am not familiar with any of this, and as somebody who is a bit old fashioned, it strikes my ear as similar to the restaurant tip analogy, in which case it seems jarringly inappropriate and cheeky. I mention this because that tone does not match with the rest of your show. So, what I am trying to get at is, what happens on your end in response to the ratings that would make you ask for a 5-star rating at the beginning of every show? Does Taunton agree to keep paying for the production? Do you get raises? Are you trying to beat out the wood whisperer?

I have one more minor comment that I would hope you could pass on to whoever is the appropriate person. The fine woodworking website is an amazing resource and I feel it is a tremendous bargain and a great supplement to my print magazine subscription. I am automatically logged in- with my email address- and I am also signed up for emails from fine woodworking. Why is it that I continually get a popup message right in the center of the page asking for my email address to get more emails? Can't somebody set a cookie that recognizes when a logged in online member has clearly provided an email address already?

Having said all of that, I want to thank you for the work you do. I really enjoy the podcast and I look forward to it. I frequently rewind it to make sure I hear everything woodworking related. It is nice for keeping connected to woodworking when I am driving or at work and I enjoy hearing your different perspectives on various topics.

Andy

PS. I read your magazine.
Posted: 5:44 pm on December 4th

cdjohnso cdjohnso writes:
Posted: 3:46 pm on December 4th

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ABOUT SHOP TALK LIVE

Fine Woodworking magzine's biweekly podcast, Shop Talk Live, allows editors, authors, and special guests to answer your woodworking questions and connect with the online woodworking community.